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little circle of bumps
Since I was about 12 I've gotten small dime-sized spots, usually on my arms, of lightly raised bumps. The first time I got them my father insisted that it was caused by worms from eating uncooked raspberries and he poked all the bumps with a needle. They weren't puss filled or anything; just seemed like skin all the way down. It was very painful when he did that and when I get them, they sometimes itch, but not always. I'm 27 now and for 15 years or so I've almost always had one of these little patches somewhere. What are they, what causes them, and what can I do about them?
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563773 tn?1374250139
Hello,
Without examination,confirmation of a diagnosis is tough but it can be discoid eczema ,pityriasis rosea, or ringworm.

Pityriasis rosea is a common human skin disease which presents as numerous patches of pink or red oval rash. The rash may be accompanied by low-grade headache, fever, nausea and fatigue and sometimes by itching.

No treatment is usually required. In most patients, the condition lasts only a matter of weeks or months(upto six months)

If the rash persists then it will be best to get it evaluated from a dermatologist.Other possibilities have to be ruled out then.

I hope it helps.Take care and pls do keep me posted on how you are doing or if you have any additional doubts.Kind regards.

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Thanks.

I took a look at images and description of each of those conditions. The problem is that all of them include discoloration, and I don't have any discoloration with the bumps. It looks like a round patch of goosebumps.

They last for a few weeks at a time. Other than occasional itching or pain if I scratch, I have no associated symptoms. Are there any other possibilities that you know of?
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ive had them before, i know what youre talking about. just wanted to look this up because i was scratching my boyfriends leg and saw the little bumps - and ive seen them before on myself on my arms, and his body numerous times..i wondered what it was, thats why i came across this...what are these?? --
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I too have tiny pin sized bumps in a circle that began showing up in January this year. (2014 for those who may come across this much later)  Since it didn't really itch I didn't pay much attention, but it has spread from the first spot on the top of my left index finger below the knuckle.  That spot is still there, but now resembles, but is not identical to, peticia dermatitis which I had an instance of many, many years ago and is harmless.  This rash is beginning to concern me since it is not going away and is now spreading over my arms.  It has spread so much that it is hard to distinguish the round pattern in some areas because they begin to run together due to once showing up they do not disappear.  I would like to post some pictures to help identify this rash.  I have reached the point of deciding to have my doctor take a look at them and once identified I will be happy to share.  This way if others have the identical pattern in a rash they will be able to tell what it is and what needs done to treat it.
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I get them too. They are just exactly as you describe. Dime sized patch of goosebump like bumps. They last a couple weeks then go away. Inconsistent in where and when they show up but always on the arms, for me. I had a doctor look at this and he thought I was crazy. I went to see him three times for it, each time they were in a new spot and he had the nerve to tell me it was because I was not washing properly and was getting infected hair follicles. In a perfect tiny cluster? And no-where else? Yeah, that's it.

I wish I knew why they show up-there has to be a reason.
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I believe you are describing a condition called granuloma annulare.
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No its not granuloma annulare.  They are tiny pin sized bumps the same as when you get the chills aka goosebumps.  They are skin colored and mine stay there permanently in one spot on the inside of my wrist.  Occasionally, it itches a little or burns and the little bumps turn red for a day.  They are almost unnoticeable.  Ive had it for 2 years now..somewhere around there.  There are seven tiny goosebumps in a perfect circle with a larger goosebump in the middle.  It's almost dime sized.  Again, you dont notice them at all until they turn red occasionally; however, you can always feel them slightly raised and harder to see because they are flesh colored, but they are always there.  Its not ringworm, and its nothing like the herald patch in pytaria rosea which my boyfriend just had.  The bumps do not touch each other.  A doctor looked at my wrist and said he had no idea.  It doesnt look like anything he has seen before.  I think its benign though and probably no cause for concern.  We are probably not going to get any answers other than an alien implant lol j/k.
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Hi, I've developed your exact sounding rash; I have done 3 things that are unusal: I've burned ylang-ylang pure and Bergamot pure essential oils: boiled marinated chicken skin and bones, and drunk a lot of vodkas. Also, my dog seems to have bumps too on his snout, tail, spine and ears; has been in both kitchen and living room AND finished one of my drinks. I'm confused and feeling guilty, advice is needed
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