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How does 70/30 insulin differ from Lantus?
I have type 1 diabetes and am on Lantus. I was wondering though what the difference between 70/30 and Lantus is. My understanding is that they are both long lasting insulins, but I don't know much else. Does anyone know?
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Hello.  I'm not a medical professional, just the parent of a kid with diabetes.  Lantus is a long acting insulin that starts working within 1 to 2 hours, with a minimal peak in about 6 hours, and lasts 24 hours.  You take one shot of it for your long acting insulin, and you still need to take a fast acting insulin to cover your corrections and meals.  It is provides a fairly constant basal insulin all day long.  70/30 mix has both, fast acting insulin to cover a meal, and long acting to provide that basal between meals.  

Here is a listing of different types of insulins and their details:
http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0n_110.htm

To me, the basic difference is variability and flexibility.  With Lantus, you know exactly what you are dosing, and you also dose exactly the amount of fast acting you need.  With 70/30 there is a lot extra to take into account.  I personally don't know many, if any, people who are still using mixed insulin, except in poorer countries where they can't get anything else.
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Hello, I've worked in the diabetes market for a while now and understand the differences between the various types of insulins.. i am also a type 1 diabetic. The previous posts explain very well the differences. If you are a type 1 than you most likely be on lantus with another fast acting insulin. The premixed insulins (such as 30/70 and mix30) are more targeted for type 2 diabetics who dont need as much flexibility with their dosing and are not on a more intense therapy. 30/70 is a fixed dose system, meaning if you test and you're a little high right now you can add more 30/70, however you are also adding more longacting insulin as well... ie. 1 unit increase in the short acting is also 1 unit more increase in the long acting. This is perhaps not exactly what you need as your sugars say 6 hours from now are not running high.
Also, the premixes are usually used once a day to two times a day (because of the amount of the long acting insulin), most type 1's are on 3 times a day or more therapy which has proven to be most optimal in control.
Hope this helps.
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