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Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have
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Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

My question is, who has the right to say an insulin dependent diabetic will have poor control of their diabetes? Question is because I have recently found out my Type 1 diabetic son will not be able to join the military, become an astronaut, drive a tractor trailer, fly an airplane or become a police officer. My son may have 60 plus years of great control. He may have 60 years of poor control. But no one will know this until it happens. In every single job I listed above, you have drug addicts working in them positions. But they are disciplined when they have a positive drug test. So why can't the same be done with an insulin dependent diabetic. Who is to say they may have a low while on duty or while driving or flying? How can that be an assumption? Do these people truly believe every single insulin diabetic will have one or many lows in their diabetic lifetime while working? I can totally understand their reasoning, but who is to say they will have a low while on duty?
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Avatar_n_tn
I am not a physician, but a volunteer and a mom of a type 1 diabetic and the daughter of a type 2.  I feel the same way you do, but my husband and I tell our daughter that she can be anything she wants to be.  Who knows they might change the rules or better yet FIND A CURE!!
You have to realize that if a person has a severe low in the military, as a pilot or in a big rig, it is not just there life at stake; they are risking the life of others.  I do know that in the state I live before a diabetic teenager gets there drivers permit and license the doctor has to sign a statement that the person has been in good control for at least 6 months.  I know several teens that have not been able to get there permits yet.  
I have also read about and, met diabetics that have had such severe lows that the local EMTs know her by her first name. Her Lows were so bad that she had an islet transplant.  
I realize that these rules are not fair to the people that are in good control, but there needs to be guide lines for everyone
46 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_n_tn
While it is true that there are several jobs a diabetic will be blocked from pursuing, there are thousands of exciting, interesting and productive jobs that we can pursue.  

Since diabetes is a life-long disease, I find it helpful to focus on the things I can do -- and build my confidence, competence and joy -- rather than to dwell on the things that could've been had I not had this disease.  I would encourage you to help your son shift his energy toward accepting the jobs he can't pursue and finding careers where he can fluorish.

Here are some additional perspectives that I hope are helpful.  If he's interested in the military, there are good civilian military roles where diabetes is not an issue.  Active duty military can get separated from their supplies and their backpacks aren't coolers.  Without refrigeration, a supply of insulin could easily become useless in the desert.  In case of attack, insulin & testing supplies could become unavailable altogether.  A diabetic separated from our life lines is a dead diabetic.  In the military setting, such a devastating personal outcome can easily jeopardize the well-being of fellow troops.  A diabetic who is low and cannot get glucose, or is high in can also jeopardize fellow troops by clouded thinking and weakened physical abilities.  Taken in this context, the ruling seems correct to me.

Non-diabetics whose eyesight is not good without correction cannot be pilots.  Sure they can wear glasses or contacts, but for the greater good, that safety precaution is in place, too.  Again, it seems reasonable to me and every time I'm in a plane that's flying thru turbulence and we're all getting jostled around, I'm glad the pilot has good eyesight.

Encourage your son to focus on careers and opportunities that he can pursue and help him build healthy emotional acceptance of his disease.
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Avatar_n_tn
Are you serious? a diabetic can't join the army! wow, that is great, that means that i can't get drafted!

I personaly would not fly on a plane if i knew the pilot was a type one diabetic, nor if he had any other history of diseases.
And this is although i myself am a type 1.

Nobody is discriminating against you, the job requires a certain standard and you don't meet that criteria.

If the NBA or the NFL would not take someone because he/she is not in shape and cannot play basketball or hockey, are they discriminating against him/her? No. The job simply requires people that meet certain standards.

The same applies if a software company won't hire someone because they don't know how to use a computer.

I personaly consider it a privilege not to be able to go to the military,
and although it is a very good thing to fight for your country and show support, at the end of the day nobody want's to be fighting. (I.e, if the whole world was at peace, and nobody ever knew of war, nobody would join the military.)

Make no mistake, it is a very good thing that you want to fight for your country and protect our nation and we all respect that, but if you can't join, there are many other things that you can do to help others.

Remember, there are millions of other diabetics (such as me) who have the same sitch as you. There are billions of other people with diseases that do not allow them to do these things as well, but we all get over it.

Positive thinking!

Best regards.



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Avatar_m_tn
Your concern strikes close to my heart. My father was a pilot, and my dream was to fly as well. I started learning with him at 5. At 13, that dream shattered by diabetes, and I found that anything else I wanted to do that required any kind of medical certification was also barred (scuba diving, skydiving, etc.). The military was also out, so I wan not drafted to go to Vietnam. I felt less of a person than my peers, and the psychological impact lasted well into adulthood. Fortunately, things are a little better now, and even diabetics can get a limited license to fly gliders and small planes (as can persons with heart disease). This does not permit the option of a career in many fields, however, and it is devastating to a diabetic who may have such dreams. I have gone 43 years without a hypoglycemic crisis that would have resulted in a dangerous situation. You are correct that there is discrimination against diabetics based on generalizations and ignorance. Fortunately my state dropped any restriction on driving based on diabetes, and I hope others will follow suit. I am sorry your son must live within these constraints. A fight for diabetic rights is due, but the desires of the type 1 population are different than the older type 2s, and we do not seem to have much of a voice compared to them. Help your son understand that the problem is in society, and not with hm. He will be capable of virtually anything he wishes to do, regardless of whether society allows it. A small comfort, but psychologically important.

Larry
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Avatar_n_tn
I was reading the postings that have been submitted, and just as an FYI   I recently found out that diabetics can go scuba diving.  There are several programs that send diabetic campers during the summer scuba diving.  If you look around there are still plenty of great adventurous things diabetics can do.
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Avatar_n_tn
I am not saying that these jobs are all that a diabetic can do. And I totally understand their reasonings for saying YOU CAN NOT DO THIS..But, who has the right to say an insulin dependent diabetic can not do this. Who says they will have poor control? A type 2 Diabetic can't understand this totally because they were able to join the military or anything their heart desired when they were old enough. But an insulin dependent diagnosed at as a child, will never be able to join the military or various other jobs that SOMEONE decided for them, they CAN NOT DO. Granted, my son is very young, but this is a fight I will never give up on. I will be standing by his side all the way, fighting for him on whatever it is he chooses to do in life. Thank you for all of your comments!
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Avatar_n_tn
As long as your diabetes type I is under good control, there is no reason why you cannot get a pilot's license (with physician sign-off), a scuba diving permit, or become a police officer. There have actually been a few recent lawsuits over type I diabetics who were disqualified from becoming a police officer due to their illness. The candidates sued, and the US Supreme Court stated that the departments had to review the candidates medical history and prove that they were not under good control before they could legally disqualify them. As far as I know, the only jobs off limits are the military and commercial aviation.
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Avatar_n_tn
If you can prove your control (good records, good A1c's, and no hospitalization due to hypoglycemic events - you should be able to find a medical flight examiner that will sign off on a medical flight certificate waiver.  I don't know if the airlines will hire your son, but he will be able to fly.  He can also obtain a scuba license, become a police officer, a firefighter, etc.  Will he be able to join the military?  Read the ADA website about the soldier that just returned from Iraq with T1 diabetes.
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559223_tn?1216413326
These are the restrictions I heard when I was a child. But things are changing. It's all on a case by case basis.

Also with the technology available now, such as highly sophisticated insulin pumps and 24hr blood sugar monitors type 1 diabetics can have better control then ever before!

If you really want to do something, you find a way.
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Avatar_m_tn
uhh I dont know who told you your son cant be a police officer....but they are DEAD wrong.

My cousin john has been a police officer for 7 years and he has been type 1 diabetic for 9 years.....you most certainly can. not just a police officer either he is a swat officer, one of the the most demanding positions...please stop going around spreading your false information, a kid could read your information and come to the conclusion that he cant be a police officer...unbenounced to him the person supplying the information is not in the position to do so....you may dash someones hopes and dreams....

DO NOT POST DUMB THINGS LIKE THIS PLEASE!

this is worse than the person who said type 1 diabetics cant work the night shift....complete bull, where these people get these wild rumors from I will never know...
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Avatar_n_tn
any information on if a diabetic can be a firefighter?  was in the army once upon a time, but am now Type 1 diabetic and can't do that dream anymore.  just curious about firefigher
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Avatar_n_tn
The saddest part too, is that I have a diabetic type 1 diagnosed at age 4, who is now 19, and can't seem to find his way in life...thinks he's the only one with it, (tried educating him, counseling, everything..., still trying) but we applied for disability at age 5 and was denied because they said, "not a disease, it can be controlled with medication."  Very frustrating!  yet, he can't join military, and every job he wants to pursue gets shot down.  He feels he'll be stuck at Walmart forever.  And his walmart manager told him recently that it is not her concern if he misses work because of his diabetes.  Same rules apply to him as everyone else!
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Avatar_n_tn
I was reading all of the postings i have an appreciation for them all however i am a 26 year old male in good physical conditon, but in a varied mental state. This is in the most part due to the fact that i have been a diabetic since the age of seventeen. I had done everything geared for the militay past my ASVAB fot accepted to the naval academy and in my senior year of high school i was diagnosed. Crushing to this day i still some times stare at the local military personel and their transportaion i.e. ships planes etc. which is espically hard for me because i live in virginia were the military is super mobile. Hurt, unsure, always aware that there is someone out there looking to shut down the dreams i have had for myself. I do understand that there are certain requirements that must be met for certain jobs but ow does any one know that i can't meet them. Before i am given a chance to get the job i am shut out Most likely i am more capable then most more heart and desire than those who are given the positions i may seek, but in the end that all dosen't matter. Where is our shot our moment to do what we feel is for us. I was just telling my wife today that she is gearing up for the military or some other high paying job as a government contractor. I am happy for her and the whole while she is telling me to cheer up, but why. Most of the comments here are from people who either don't have diabetes, or the desire to serve in something that is truly greater than themselves as one person stated he is happy he is a diabetic because he cant go to war. What about not being able to afford health care no one will take you. It is like being punished for something that is in my control because the government says it is a controllable disease, but out of my control because the government does not allow me to seek the paths that i truly disire. It is not a situation of dont worry be happy it is how do i truly find liveable happiness when what i desire to do, truely desire to do is always held from me, I dont want to work behind a desk. Some people are cool with the everyday rat race, some want to be that hunter moving beyond the mediocre. I still sit sometimes and cry to be honest because I CAN"T DO WHAT I WANT TO DO, I AM ALWAYS FORCED TO DO WHAT I HAVE TO DO. where is the happiness in that. That is the difference between living and existing
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Avatar_n_tn
Wished that I knew about being a police officer or fire fighter years ago being diabetic.  At onetime it wasn't accepted but now it is.  Depends on your area, country, state etc.

I found it rather interesting back when  I was in highschool years ago and a recruiter called me up trying to get me interested in joining the military.  I basically said to him that you all won't take me because I'm diabetic.  He came back and said to me, "...well son when you get that fixed, call us back...."

More or less this is where I believe that there's an education problem going on in society with our situations.  Its not the 1920's or even the 1950-1980 time periods anymore.  People have abilities to keep themselves healthier than back then.  I keep thinking that in some ways if a study was done between people with and or without this situation, there could be advantages to people who have this situation because personally when your diabetic, your not always as hungry, which could help out during long times without abilities to deal with food.  When you have a pump or even on injections, you can take in smaller amounts of food and or insulin to deal with situations a lot easier than someone who doesn't and in a lot of ways, have easier times dealing with those situations.  Its a lot easier to loose weight because of this also I feel.  I think the issue would be having the science to back up the issues.  Until that's done, there's always the false preconceptions in someone's mind from the issues of some older relative and the way they treated these issues with this situation.
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Avatar_m_tn
I myself was in the army when i was diagnosed with diabeties. How ever, you can be in the forces and a diabetic. The only stipulation is that it is controlled thru diet and exercise. This is only as far as basic training, because it is against regulation to have sharps of any kind at basic. after that im told the regulation lighten up a bit. It is the same catch with children. you can not have more than,,,2,,,or 3 children and join. However after basic training is over i know persons including generals and majors with 6 children. Personally i think there pay ***** and they dont want someone in the army collecting food stamps,,,lol. bad image.
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Avatar_m_tn
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzdhBo4pbgE

check this out
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Avatar_m_tn
hi im 16 and now know what a load of **** all theese rules actually are. diabetics can do anything that a no dibetic could. personaly the **** that said he wouldent get on a plane if he new the pilot was diabetic is actually talking rubbish. its like saying that u wouldnt fly if the person dint come speak english or if it was a woman. i could easly pas any physical test given to me that a normal person could pass.
whats worse an i cant also give blood/organs. tbh i would rather be diabetic than die
i also can go ski diving
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1256262_tn?1269395688
I'm 27 and have had type 1 for 26 years. When I was a kid, it was my dream to be a Naval Aviatior. Too bad I can't join the military or fly commercially. I did what I thought was the next best thing. I became an Aircraft Maintenance Technician. (By the way, you CAN fly a plane as a diabetic, as a sport aviator) Quit looking at all the negatives and the "woe is me, i have diabetes, they wont let me". If you keep thinking like that, you or your kids and your loved ones that are affected with diabetes are skrewed. life will knock your **** in the dirt, with that attitude. Instead of crying about what you cant do, find out what you or your child excell at, and be great at that. Believe it or not, Diabetics are PERFECTLY DESIGNED TO BE ATHLETES! I personally excell at being a physical trainer, martial arts, powerlifting, olympic lifting, running, parkour, and any other physical activity you throw at me.

As a commercial pilot, you sit in a chair all day. In most aircraft, the pilots job is LIMITED at best, and the pilot is nearly unnecessary.

As a truck driver, you sit in a chair all day.

In the military, you get killed.

Quit crying about what you CANT do, and figure out what youre great at, and excell at that.
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Avatar_n_tn
can  people with diabeties be a police officer because that is what i am hoping to be
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Avatar_m_tn
Im 23. Diabetic for 8 yrs no major problems with hypos. I recently got accepted to be a aviation fire fighter passed my medicals and was cleared to take part in recruit course. Half way through the course i was removed because of my diabetes.. I had passed all physical tests and my instructors said as long as i continue with my performance i will not have a problem passing the course. There were people on the course that had not passed all physical tests and they were allowed to continue. I am currently awaiting a decision to be made if i can continue on the next recruit course. In which i would have to start all over again. I do understand the requirements you must meet in order to get some of these jobs as being a diabetic puts you at risk. But i feel that its not that much different if a non diabetic wasnt looking after themselves not eating wouldnt that put them at risk as well.
I honestly dont feel that there is anything out there that i wouldnt be able to do as good as a non diabetic. With the exception of perhaps front line in the army.
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Avatar_f_tn
I am a mom of an 18 years old boy who was diagnozed with Type 1 Diabetes a few months ago. He wants to be an auto technician. I am very worried about his choice. Seems it's not the best for a diabetic to crowl under the cars all day long and to be in dirt and cold. What do you think? Am I right? He doesn't want to listen, and he is graduating soon and needs to make a choice.... Thank you!
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Avatar_f_tn
i feel like killing myself its not my fault i have diabetes where i have to inject insuline, i wanted to be a astronaut and be able to go out in space but why are the rules so srtict why cant they let atleast people with good control of diabetes become astronauts, i realllllyyyyy want the rules to change i want to go out in space :'(
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1500938_tn?1289265273
I like that quit crying about what  you can't do and find what you can do.I dreamed of being a princess when i was little and Type 1 or not I found out no-one was hiring!!!!Just kidding I wanted to joinn the military.
Diabetes is 365,24/7 no breaks!!That can either make you or break you.Let it make you into a person that knows more about how their bodies work than most people  and can empathise with just about any situation.Maybe Human Service work or healthcare?
Personally I know I can do anything I want ,pushing myself there.But there have been times that hypoglycemic episodes have affected my life.So I understand the possibility is there,I would hate to think i couldn't come through for a partner or fellow sodier because I can't move because my sugar is so low.
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Avatar_n_tn
I am 33 yrs old..recently diagnosed as Type 1 @ 30.. Yeah I know kinda late in life, but none the less they did all the testing and sure enough Type 1 just like my father. I can say that in the last 20+ years they have come along way in how diabetics are medicated. Had they had pumps back when my dad got diagnosed he may still be alive today. I am hopeful that a cure will come-- hopefully my children will never get it. I never realized the impact that type 1 diabetes has on a person- even though I watched my dad every single day with it.
Personally I think that if the person has had good control, is on a insulin pump/Continuous blood glucose monitoring they should be allowed to be in the military. Maybe NOT front line or pilots but we diabetes should NOT be discriminated from the entire military just because our bodies stopped producing insulin. There are many jobs within the military that you do not have to be in combat or fly a plane.  I can say that in the 3 1/2 yrs that I have been diagnosed I have had my fair share of highs and lows-- I am learning to live with this disease. When I was first diagnosed my levels had been so high for soo very long(didn't know I was diabetic) they couldn't test my A1c it was off the charts... Gladly to say that my A1C is now still a tiny bit high @ 8 but it is MUCH lower than it was.
I have always said that diabetes invaded my life-- and that myself and it will have to learn to live together... there is NOTHING I can NOT do-- only what I limit MYSELF to do!
I say Uncle Sam, if I(diabetic) can get a job as a nurse, lawyer, counselor, laborer,electrician,doctor, chef, ETC... in the civilian world then I(diabetic) should be able to be in your military. If I(diabetic) wants to be part of the military that gives us freedom then why should I(diabetic) be denied this right. I am not saying be on the front line, in combat, but part of the logistical area of the military- the support staff.  There are many diseases that your turn your back on and this should be one of them that you do as well.

I have been in the medical field for 15 years-- in the last 3 years I have worked as a traveling phlebotomist(blood taker,vampire lol) I have worked midnights-- sometimes 7 days a week 12 hrs a day. As a diabetic I know how far to push myself, I know when my sugar is going on the low end-- I know when my sugar is creeping up there-- as a responsible diabetic I take matters to control this.. I know that sometimes it can happen without warning as well. I am just saying if we diabetics can have positions like this in the civilian world why can't we have them in the military.
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144586_tn?1284669764
Many rules were proposed beforen the advent of modern glucose meters and have been relaxed considerably. Forty years ago these were necessary for the pubic safety, which is an over-riding consideration..

With waivers a diabetic can possess a CDL for example, drive a tractor-trailer in interstate commerce, and fly an airplane.
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Avatar_n_tn
Whether the diabitic person can be examined as fit to join the indian government jobs
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Avatar_f_tn
i am a 16 year old girl and have wanted to be in the military ever since i was a little kid. i was dianosed with type 2 diabetes at 16 months old. when i found out i couldnt be in the military when i was young and didnt really understand what it meant so my question  now is even though i am a type 1 diabetic can i still be a medic in the military?
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Avatar_m_tn
Most of these post's are lie's! ive been a type 1 diabetic since the age of 4 and it never stopped me doing anything, im a personal fitness trainer and a football(soccer) coach in Scotland. you could say im in better condition than alot of people in the military.

To the person who said diabetics cant scuba dive OR sky dive your facts are wrong! ive sky dived on many occasions and i actually used to work is Australia during there summer months on a boat that took tourists scuba diving and i used to get in the water quite alot!

there are some jobs that diabetics cant do like the military! or be in control or an aircraft! you also cant be in control of a vehicle that might put anyone elce at risk in the work place i.e bus driver and so on.

you can work in the emergency services like the police, firefighters and so on, you just cant be in control of the vehicle!

Dont let it hold you back, i love my life and if it wasnt for diabetes i wouldnt be as fit and in shape as i am today!!!!!
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Avatar_m_tn
you know im 20 years old and i have type1 diabetes and i think the entire thing is crap i am fully capable of joining the army but will they let me no its my life and if i choose to do something ive been wanting to do for a long time im going to do it we only live once why not make it doing something you want to do well iot news for them if they ever get in the stuggle of needing ppl ima tell then no! cuz where were they when i wanted to join
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi, I'm a type one diabetic for the past 15 years i just had a job interview today and i had to take a physical and by some bad luck my sugar was 515 and they denied me the job because of my sugar and the jobs a factory furnace operator I'm just wondering if this is legal or if i could take them to court.    
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Avatar_m_tn
I am 58, i was diagnosed with type 1 3 years ago. you go for a job and with out discriminating, you are dropped. employers are ether frightened or there insurance goes up. but some jobs you cant get though. perhaps in years to come things will change when a little more is known or a cure is found for kick starting the pancreas.I have a good control over my type 1, i lead a normal life, but work, well it is not that i don't want to work they wont employ me.
Good luck to lilbrat1528 in the future. Robert.

    
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Avatar_m_tn
This is in response to the initial post, I am a 20 year old type 1 diabetic and have been diabetic since I was 8, my dream was to be in the police force...still is...but for your sons sake you need to concentrate on the positive aspects of diabetes. I am currently training to become a diabetes specialist nurse as my 1st hand knowledge of the subject is better than any qualification and because of this allows you to connect further with patients. I also feel that I am a lot healthier because I have diabetes, I keep fit and never touch drugs, I feel that if I wasn't diabetic I would have been a bit of a wild child. Instead of seeing it is holding a person back see it as pushing them forward to a better life...this is not to say it is not difficult, but you begin to appreciate things more.
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Avatar_m_tn
As a fellow type1 diabetic (diagnosed 20 years ago), I suggest getting your blood glucose levels under better control before wasting money in court. I understand not all diabetics can feel when they drop below 90 or rise above 160, but that's no excuse for poor control. You have no room to complain if your blood sugar is showing up 515 at a job interview.
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2127039_tn?1335320062
I have had type 1 diabetes since 2007 when I was 12. Now I am 17 and I am looking for a career that is in Crime, such as a CSI or a Homicide Detective. I am wondering if these would be okay career  choices for a diabetic like me. I am still struggling with control, but I have an insulin pump and continually check my BG. Is there any tips on more ways to stabalize myself or information on diabetics and Criminal Justice Careers? Please post back and/ or e-mail me at this following address. Thank you so much, Kela.
K_rose1300***@****
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Avatar_m_tn
My husband has had type 1 diabetes since he was 11 and he has been a diesel mechanic for 17 yrs. the only thing he has not done is get a insulin pump because of crawling into, under and around trucks.
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Avatar_m_tn
You see, I've heard those statements in the past and they are rubbish.  The one that involves using a computer is the worst: anyone can learn how to use a computer or take enough training to meet the requirements for the job.  A type 1 diabetic cannot learn not to be a diabetic.  Furthermore, there are several positions, say in the military, that are non-combatant.  The argument against training a diabetic for these roles is it would be unfair for them to be automatically given preferential (and some would consider preferable) assignment.  However, what would be consider a annoyance to non diabetics who get assigned combatant roles in the military is no where near the heartache of being a diabetic and not even given any consideration.  It is literally like having a door shut in your face walking into a recruiting office and stating honestly that you are a type 1 diabetic.  You get the feeling that you are unclean in their eyes.  I highly doubt you are a diabetic if you take such a complacent stance to the issue.
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Avatar_m_tn
  I found out I was type II at fifty ,and due to highs was switched to a type one
  At that time I was put on insulin. It was at that time they pulled my class
A licence, so I had to sell off the transport. I was also a carpenter framer
problem is working at heights ... well who knows! I could have a low .
I am in  top shape and have no other problems what so ever but
when I catch the sugar lows ,which I might add I can tell when they happen
at the point while its very slight. Just the same I would not trust 60000
lbs of steel crashing down on another car because of my health problems,I simply could not live with myself knowing I killed someone when it could be avoided.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have had type 1 diabetes for 22 years I am now 26 years old. my blood sugars are extremely controlled i check my blood sugars 6-8 times a day and watch what I eat but this doesn't mean that my blood sugar doesn't drop. any increase of stress or being scared or startled can drop my blood sugar immediately and my brain is no longer working properly basically turning into mush until my sugars return to normal. All this to say that some jobs are just not safe for us to do. Yes it ***** but the beauty of it is that there are so many jobs we can do and live a healthy life. I would never want a type 1 diabetic flying a plane or going to Irak to fight in a war, We already have to live and deal with this horrible disease. Keeping stress levels down and staying out of stressful situations is the best thing to do to keep blood sugars regular.
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Avatar_f_tn
I agree, but just to clarify, I believe it is only commercial pilot licenses that are not given to people who tak insulin.  I ran into the same thing several times in my life... I did very well on the ASVAB but couldn't be in the military.  Then, I became an accountant and wanted to be an IRS agent with the CID (mostly goes after bigger criminals, such as arms dealers) on financial crimes.  Unfortunately, I didn't qualify to be a federal agent.
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Avatar_n_tn
Who ever told you he can't be a cop is lying or misinformed... I'm a type 1 diabetic and in the process of joining the Boston Police Department in a few years and pursuing S.W.A.T. as a sniper (all things they told me I was NOT disqualified for b/c of my illness...). I've also spoken with government intelligence agencies about becoming a field agent and all they said was get a Master's degree with class time in courses that are geared towards intelligence and get experience...  It's possible. You just have to be willing to work for it. Having bad sugar numbers will hurt you both medically and in searching for a career... I was diagnosed in 08' and my life's dream was to be a marine sharpshooter... and I was a damn good shot at 13. It destroyed me for a few years but I got a grip and got over it. whining about it does nothing but weaken you... My goal now? to prove to the military that I'm a better shot than EVERY sniper they have and to get on with my life. living in sadness only makes you weak. find a hobby, find an alternative, find a purpose, and you will do great things
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4940325_tn?1363038957
Those who issue licenses are the ones who have the right to exclude anyone who may be harmful to himself or others.  As a type-1 myself, I agree that it would be best to assess each person individually.  However, as a parent, I understand completely the need to keep potentially unsafe individuals from operating the kind of machinery that might accidentally kill someone else.
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Avatar_m_tn
This is almost my exact life story; however, I only got diagnosed a year ago (currently 18), and I'm a female.  I just want to be happy.
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As a type 1 diabetic myself, I find this rediculis. I have not had a seizure since I was 3, I haven't been above 275 for nearly a month and I can't even remember the last time I was low because I take care of myself and I actually pay attention to my body. I always wanted to be a police officer, but my dreams were crushed when I was told I can't because of the people who don't take care of themselves. I think this should be a person-to-person type of thing, since those of us who actually want to make something of ourselves deserve to be able to follow out dreams, and I very well intend to fight this.
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I became Type 1 when I was 16. It kind of wrecked my plans to get my SCUBA permit that summer because, at the time, my home state didn't allow it. It also botched my plans to join the military for scholarship money (Thank Dog! Has anyone seen "The Invisible War"?). So I had to work regular college student-type jobs, earn academic scholarships and take out student loans. The people commonly referred to as my parents didn't believe in assisting me in the pursuit of any degree, or anything, in any way.

They also focused on what I couldn't do... "Well, now you you can't be an astronaut... Now you can't join the military... Now you can't be an underwater welder... Now you can't exactly do much to get through medical school, can you?... " and on and on. They may or may not have realized it, I suspect that they did, and you may not either, but that negativity and focus on what one CAN'T do, is crushing to one's self-esteem. You may think that you're helping, that you're somehow "advocating", but true advocation is positive, not negative. Letting the Juvenile Diabetes Whatever, some other ADVOCACY organization or lawsuits initiated by the person with the condition do the work of making change... Not your vocal gripings.

Anyway, after a young lifetime of their crap, and the same echoed by my siblings, and their undermining and now their new form of letting me know JUST EXACTLY WHAT I COULDN'T DO, I made new goals. MY GOALS. I threw myself hard into academia, the arts and writing, discovered that I am a gifted visual artist and writer, got my SCUBA license when my state changed the law, became a tireless progressive activist for many years and a more easily tired one now, am currently working on a heavy-duty 2nd Bachelor's before I begin the pursuit of my Master's in Interior & Landscape Architecture, found people (including my first love from college, and now my awesome husband, when that first 13-yr relationship ended) who support me as a Type 1 with a litany of auto-immune disorders that grows longer every year (and PTSD, etc) and eventually, wrote off my entire bloodline.

I've worked for various non-profits for nearly the entire duration of my career. The work I'm most proud of, and that is far more admirable than murdering or forcibly "re-educating" people in foreign lands for oil, acquiring their land to run pipelines across or to destroy their culture/religion, has been working with adults and teens, and the occasional youngster, with developmental, physical and/or mental/Traumatic Brain Injury/psychiatric  disabilities. I've done everything from the grunt work of physical care, housecleaning and food prep to managing group homes, teaching art, cooking and physical activity classes, planned year-long goals & activities with clients to be presented at their annual meetings and attended/advocated at said meetings, met with my clients' doctors with them and spent countless hours in hospital ERs and rooms at their bedsides. I also helped one client in his 70s realize his dream of becoming Elvis by designing, sewing and decorating a flawless white polyester and royal blue satin jumpsuit, practice and perform his on-stage number and present his 90-something year-old mother with a rose and his Bedazzled satin scarf at the end of his performance. He earned a standing ovation and there wasn't a dry eye in the house, as most of the people there for this donors' event had known him and of his dream for years. And at that same  job, I created a spectacular holiday production utilizing the talents of clients who had never been included in any of these events before, with an amazing set, several dance numbers, comic interludes and 15 awesome costumes, including makeup & hair, that I designed, created and implemented myself. The parents, siblings and caregivers of the performers were so pleased that I received a letter of thanks and appreciation and a big fat bonus for bringing such joy to so many. One of the stars of the show, who'd been a client at that facility for over 15 years and had never once been asked to participate in a production, passed away only a couple of months later. His mother couldn't have been more appreciative that she was able to film her son's big debut just months prior to his passing.

I don't work in that field anymore. I made the mistake of trying to make changes that I thought, and still believe, necessary by beginning the climb up the beaurocratic ladder. One person not only can't make those changes alone, but is driven out. Ah, that is another story.

My point is that your child can do many amazing things. A lifetime of them. And maybe, like me, different types of things. Who knows where his journey will take him? But I can assure you that if you want to be witness to that journey, and you want it to be filled with a positive light rather than a negative darkness, you should stop complaining about what CAN'T happen and focus on all the amazing greatness that can. That's your job as a parent.
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I became Type 1 when I was 16. It kind of wrecked my plans to get my SCUBA permit that summer because, at the time, my home state didn't allow it. It also botched my plans to join the military for scholarship money (Thank Dog! Has anyone seen "The Invisible War"?). So I had to work regular college student-type jobs, earn academic scholarships and take out student loans. The people commonly referred to as my parents didn't believe in assisting me in the pursuit of any degree, or anything, in any way.

They also focused on what I couldn't do... "Well, now you you can't be an astronaut... Now you can't join the military... Now you can't be an underwater welder... Now you can't exactly do much to get through medical school, can you?... " and on and on. They may or may not have realized it, I suspect that they did, and you may not either, but that negativity and focus on what one CAN'T do, is crushing to one's self-esteem. You may think that you're helping, that you're somehow "advocating", but true advocation is positive, not negative. Letting the Juvenile Diabetes Whatever, some other ADVOCACY organization or lawsuits initiated by the person with the condition do the work of making change... Not your vocal gripings.

Anyway, after a young lifetime of their crap, and the same echoed by my siblings, and their undermining and now their new form of letting me know JUST EXACTLY WHAT I COULDN'T DO, I made new goals. MY GOALS. I threw myself hard into academia, the arts and writing, discovered that I am a gifted visual artist and writer, got my SCUBA license when my state changed the law, became a tireless progressive activist for many years and a more easily tired one now, am currently working on a heavy-duty 2nd Bachelor's before I begin the pursuit of my Master's in Interior & Landscape Architecture, found people (including my first love from college, and now my awesome husband, when that first 13-yr relationship ended) who support me as a Type 1 with a litany of auto-immune disorders that grows longer every year (and PTSD, etc) and eventually, wrote off my entire bloodline.

I've worked for various non-profits for nearly the entire duration of my career. The work I'm most proud of, and that is far more admirable than murdering or forcibly "re-educating" people in foreign lands for oil, acquiring their land to run pipelines across or to destroy their culture/religion, has been working with adults and teens, and the occasional youngster, with developmental, physical and/or mental/Traumatic Brain Injury/psychiatric  disabilities. I've done everything from the grunt work of physical care, housecleaning and food prep to managing group homes, teaching art, cooking and physical activity classes, planned year-long goals & activities with clients to be presented at their annual meetings and attended/advocated at said meetings, met with my clients' doctors with them and spent countless hours in hospital ERs and rooms at their bedsides. I also helped one client in his 70s realize his dream of becoming Elvis by designing, sewing and decorating a flawless white polyester and royal blue satin jumpsuit, practice and perform his on-stage number and present his 90-something year-old mother with a rose and his Bedazzled satin scarf at the end of his performance. He earned a standing ovation and there wasn't a dry eye in the house, as most of the people there for this donors' event had known him and of his dream for years. And at that same  job, I created a spectacular holiday production utilizing the talents of clients who had never been included in any of these events before, with an amazing set, several dance numbers, comic interludes and 15 awesome costumes, including makeup & hair, that I designed, created and implemented myself. The parents, siblings and caregivers of the performers were so pleased that I received a letter of thanks and appreciation and a big fat bonus for bringing such joy to so many. One of the stars of the show, who'd been a client at that facility for over 15 years and had never once been asked to participate in a production, passed away only a couple of months later. His mother couldn't have been more appreciative that she was able to film her son's big debut just months prior to his passing.

I don't work in that field anymore. I made the mistake of trying to make changes that I thought, and still believe, necessary by beginning the climb up the beaurocratic ladder. One person not only can't make those changes alone, but is driven out. Ah, that is another story.

My point is that your child can do many amazing things. A lifetime of them. And maybe, like me, different types of things. Who knows where his journey will take him? But I can assure you that if you want to be witness to that journey, and you want it to be filled with a positive light rather than a negative darkness, you should stop complaining about what CAN'T happen and focus on all the amazing greatness that can. That's your job as a parent.
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I am 17 almost 18 years old with type 1 diabetese. I know how your diabetic feels. I've felt the same way since i was 10. Maybe if your diabetic found another person who completely understands what its like to be a young adult with this disease he will find interest in his disease and will then gain a life long friend who can listen to his "diabetic rants".  Is there possibly a group of diabetics that get together in your area?
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