Diabetes - Type 1 Community
Military Discrimination
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Military Discrimination

I am 22 years old and currently attending the University of
Georgia.  My entire life I have wanted to serve in the
military and protect my country.  Unfortunately, I am an
insulin dependent diabetic.  I am in perfect health and
physically fit.  I have no complications after having this
disease for over 17 years.  No branch of the military will
allow me to enlist due to the fact that I am a diabetic.  
Considering I am perfectly able to do anything that the
military requires, I think this is extremely unfair and
unjust.  I certainly understand why they would not want a
diabetic to fill a combat position, but there are numerous
non-combat positions that a diabetic could fill.  I feel that
this is a very blatent example of discrimination.  I would
very much appreciate anyone who could give me some advice on
some options I might have to fight this.  I could certainly
use a helping hand in this situation.
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
Dear TShelton,
My son also wanted to join the military.  He was diagnosed at 8 years and is now 27. As a mother and volunteer of JDRF, I cannot give you legal advice as part of our organization.

From our own experience, we talked to many organizations regarding this matter. Unfortunately, back in 1992 at least, the military won't budge in this matter.  Even thogh we know of all of the forward technology that is available for people with diabetes, it seems to me the military is a bit behind the times.  While I agree in someways with active combat, I never felt one should be disallowed with serving in a non-combat position.  

I hate to be negative on this very important question but the only solution you might have is to retain councel, but in our case, my son didn't get far.

If he couldn't go into the military, he wanted to join the police force or become a firefighter.  Again he was turned down for the same reasons. Times are changing so please don't give up.  Jesse fought forestfires in Montana and Idaho this past summer which can consist of 18 hour days and is skiing on a local pass for propatrol during the winter. He will also be attending college to further medical training to help in hospital trauma.

I guess my point is there are many ways to serve your country.  It sounds like your passion is with the military, but please, if the military cannot be realized, look at other options.  My son did and realized as long as he was protecting homes from fire or helping the injured on ski slopes, he was helping others.

I know this is not what you wanted to hear, but my hope is that things will change.  Look for other comments that maybe posted with different answer's.
Best of Luck,
dm
71 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear TShelton,
I don't know if this helps, but I was looking into this issue a little more.  I was told to have you look at the website, www.firstgov.gov. I haven't checked it out but it can't hurt.  Please stay in touch, I would personally love to hear how you are doing.
Best Wish's,
dm
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you very much for your advice and support.  I am trying to get in touch with people I think can help me, and who have the connections needed.  Hopefully I will be successful in my venture.  I am very glad to hear that your son found something that he has a passion for doing.  I will keep you informed of the information I obtain.  Thanks again
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Avatar_n_tn
I am a type 1 diabetic who is married to a military colonel. The problem is that the military cannot accept a diabetic and then give him or her "preference" by not sending that diabetic person into an area that does not have medical care. It would be terribly unfair to the other military people to "prefer" the diabetic by not sending him or her into a position that might threaten his or her life. When it comes to life or death matters, all absolutely MUST be able to carry the same load, and must be able to survive if supplies are not able to be delivered. If a person cannot survive under those conditions, they cannot be accepted into military service. It is only fair to the other military people to only accept those that can fully serve without any preference. Like you, I am fully healthy. But you must be realistic and accept the fact that we absolutely must have that insulin. There is no way the military will ever be able to bend those rules. One alternative would be to take a civil service job on a military base, for frankly, there are many civilian positions open now that used to be filled by active duty military as the military downsized budgets have forced many jobs to become civilian now. I have worked as a civilian doing pilot training courseware, and there is no discrimination at all as far as the diabetes is concerned in civilian jobs. There are civilian jobs in almost every area of military life now. I would check these out carefully upon graduation from college. Pay and benefits are good and you are a full part of the military mission as a civilian.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you for the advice.  Could you inform me on some of those civilian jobs and how I might obtain some information on them?  Thanks again?
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Avatar_n_tn
And I want to ask you honestly, not being sarcastic in the least.  Do you think that I would be cutt off for a long enough period of time without supplies where I could not bring that much insulin with me?  One bottle of Humalog lasts me over a month.  If I had more than one and syringes I really believe I could survive for quite a while.  Thanks for any input.
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Avatar_n_tn
Of course I care deeply about folks who wish to join our military "family" and I respect your for that desire. If you were put into a war zone, anything can happen (just read the news about troops being ambushed daily). Now we both know that not all folks end up in war zones, and if so, maybe not often. But from what my spouse tells me about policies (he is a personnel officer), the problem is the one time it can happen. The military cannot be responsible for protecting that one vial of insulin. If you are separated from it in a war zone, you would be at risk. And of course your compatriots would want to help you, so their lives may be at risk because of that effort to try to help. Now, this happens all the time in military situations -- some folks will get shot down in a helicopter like the one that was shot down while on their way to R&R, and the others all stopped to try to help. But the difference is that there is no previous possible danger or weakness to those troops which would perhaps make them less able to survive if they did get captured or their immediate supplies were blown up. I understand that one vial of insulin lasts a good month, and most of us keep a spare handy just in case one breaks. But in a situation where a convoy was stopped and you were perhaps taken prisoner, your life would be in peril. This is perhaps a long shot, but it is possible. And a commander in charge, knowing that this may be a danger, may be hesitant to put you at risk and this could end up favoring you over some other guy. Even a hypoglycemic episode due to stress could put your buddies at risk if you were unable to function at top ability.

I am merely a spouse, and I know that the recruiters are simply going to list what the rules are and turn you away. I suspect that if you tried to contact the Personnel Center (in the Air Force, this would be the Mission Support Squadron), you will be given the same info. But feel free to try, for they may explain their policies better than I can as an observer and outsider. Or maybe they will simply send you the form letter saying that they cannot accept you. No telling. But it doesn't hurt to ask the questions. Just don't count on changing any policies. All the policy-making is done at much higher levels than the nearest base.

As for civilian jobs, try checking out the nearest military base's web site. I know that they usually are found at www.basenamehere.branchofservicehere.mil (i.e., www.randolph.af.mil for Randolph Air Force Base in Texas). Once you are in, there is usually an employment link. Each base handles its own web site, so you may have to go browsing to find the employment link. There really are tons of civilian jobs out there in almost all fields. if they require special security clearance, many of them will see that their candidate gets the necessary clearance after hiring. There perhaps is no real glory in being the civilian partner to the active duty person, but the jobs are there and need quality people who understand military concerns. I encourage you to check them out. I have been proud of the times I have done civilian jobs for the military while married to my active duty spouse.
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear TShelton,
SGG is being modest. You had talked about non-combat roles in the military and when I spoke to a few military people, they also agreed that at anytime, you could find yourself without supplies. Civilian postions are very necessary with the military and you just might find your niche.  SGG, has from experience, very valuable experience and good advice in my opinion.  I know how much this means to you, please let us know what you decide. Keep your chin up.
Best wishes'
dm
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Avatar_n_tn
Diabetes is a condition that the military does not want to deal with.

I am in the Military (Type II Diabetic) and they can't get me out fast enough!  They're trying every thing they can to justify Booting me out.  My impeccable job performance is not included in my evaluation.  the only thing they are concerned with is all the "What ifs".  If you are not in perfect health you have to have a means to prove you can optain perfect health in sort order.  DIABETES is not one of those things that you can provide that type of concrete evidence.

BEST THING TO DO IS NOT TELL THEM YOU ARE A DIABETIC!
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Avatar_n_tn
the military is 100% right on not letting diabetics into the military. What were to happen if u were stranded, captured, or had to go days without food, like many people in the military have to endure. If your a diabetic, you would put your life at risk, as well as your whole squad
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Avatar_n_tn
I am also a Type 1 diabetic and i am 19 years old. My dream as a kid was allways to be in sometime of military service. With my disease the U.S. for some reason does not give a damn about my service. Now from reading what the other guy has said about the military and diabetics I see were he is going with it. But what if they could set up a Unit or Division that was strictly for diabetics. I am hell in civil war all the way to WW2 they split the races up like spanish and black units. Why cant they split up and make a type 1 diabetic unit!!!
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Avatar_n_tn
First of all, don't knock a diabetic for wanting to serve their country just like every other patriotic person. My goal was to go into the Airforce after highschool. My testing was near perfect (want to still call me a retard). Before I graduated I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and there went my chances for serving my country.
It is to people like you that sterotype people like us and call us stupid or retarded because of you own faults. I'm 6' 210 pounds and 12% body fat. Want to still call me a retard? I would love to serve my country if I were allowed, but I'm not. I can't drive a truck, I can't be a cop, I can't be in the FBI or CIA. My only options are desk jobs. People like you who don't understand what diabetes is and what a diabetic has to do to live are the "RETARDED" ones.
I have a friend of mine that is in the military and he has tried to get me to go in time and time again, but due to my diabetes I can't. He does not know I have it. That is how good I am. I keep up with him and he is way up there in the military. I have a four year degree and could come in as an officer if given the op (Still want to say I'm retarded).

GET A LIFE MAN. SERVE YOUR COUNTRY PROUDLY AND IF A DIABETIC IS STANDING NEXT TO YOU, PRAY THEY WILL SAVE YOU IF YOU GET SHOT.

Later,
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Avatar_n_tn
Everyone that is arguing that diabetics "require" food or medicine doesn't understand the disease or ones ability to control it.  Don't fuel the argument with your ignorance.  I am a type I insulin dependent diabetic.  I am also a marathon runner, firefighter, and prior serving navy helicopter rescue swimmer; an elite military job.  On some days, I take little insulin and on many I don't take any at all.  I control my diabetes by limiting the carbohydrates I consume and/or by exercising.  My A1c hasn't exceeded 6.0 which is probably better than most "non diabetics."  Diabetics don't "need to eat" unless they experience a low blood sugar caused by too much insulin on board.  Diabetics "don't need insulin" unless they ingest too many carbohydrates or aren't exercising enough.  I wear a glucose monitoring system that measures my blood sugars all day long notifying me of dangerous blood sugar levels.  I also wear an insulin pump that adminsters insulin when I need it and eliminates the need for syringes.  Please read the ADA website about the soldier that has just returned while successfully serving in Iraq WITH type I diabetes.

TShelton - Go for it.  Just be prepared to prove yourself and put up a strong fight.  It'll be good training for when you finally make it to your unit.

Fellow Type I, Current Firefighter and Marathoner, Prior Rescue Swimmer  
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Avatar_m_tn
I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in october, 2006. I was half way through my pilot training. All I've ever wanted to do is serve as a pilot in the military. I've been told that simply because of my under-control, non-limiting diabetes i cannot even serve as a civilian pilot. I'm 18 now. I'm attending a college i dont want to. I'm taking classes i dont care for. I'm living a life leading seemingly nowhere. If anybody please has any possible ideas of what i could do...I just cant take office jobs. I prefer something exciting and working out on the field. Please e-mail with any ideas if you can. I would greatly appreciate any input. thanks.

e-mail: ***@****

For all of you who are diabetics wanting to be in the military: I guarantee that you can do a better job than any other non-diabetic out there. The military has lost a great asset. It's their loss, not ours.

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Avatar_n_tn
I believe that they should giv diabetics a chance test there fitness levels and there liability to diabetic incedents in some kind of pre baisic training potential military personel and if they pass that let them try and pass baisic training with the rest of them if they fail because they are not in decent control thats ther problem but the ones who can keep up and fight with the rest let thm join the army ,marines and all tht
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Avatar_f_tn
Hey,

I too am a diabetic and have grown up around the military my whole life.  Finally when the chance comes to put on a uniform and do what I have been trained to do my whole life the government says NO, but not only no but also that I am no good, not good enough.  I am here for you as I have been waging this battle for the past 7 years.  I say all of us unite and make a stand against this.  There is power in numbers and if we get enough people together we will make our point made and our voices will be heard.  

I say all people of this great nation should have the chance to join and serve in the military.  I too want in soooo bad that I can taste it.  The government should not be able to choose who can or who can not serve to protect this country.  Especially with the way things are now, you would think that the government would want us to join because there are well over 75,000 people that are just like us that too want to join.
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Avatar_n_tn
I know I am a little late weighing in on this topic, but better late than never. I have a lot of personal experience dealing with some of the issues that have been discussed in previous posts.

I joined the Army National Guard in January of 1998. I chose to lead a civilian life, but also had a passion for serving my country. I have been on several deployments, both stateside and overseas, including 18 months spent in various parts of Iraq in 2002 and 2003. It wasnt until 1/05 that I ended up in the hospital for 7 days due to diabetes. I was shocked when the doctors told me that I was diabetic. I played soccer, football, wrestled, and stayed active for the military my entire life, and had essentially controlled or atleast kept myself out of the hospital through diet and excersice without even knowing it. I know have a much better control of my diabetes with the assistance of very small amounts of insulin 4 times a day, coupled with a strict diet and excersise.

The point of this isnt really to tell my life story, but to tell you how it has effected my career in the military. I have 2 friends that have been in my unit over the years that were diagnosed with diabetes well after enlistment, cases very similar to mine. One of them was medically discharged without much fight and the other put up a fight but eventually lost. He is now a police officer in TX. My leadership did thier best to keep my condition somewhat under wraps, due to my insistance and ability to continually prove my worth and right to serve. Eventually it caught up to me as the unit had to undergo a medical screening in preparation for another deployment to Iraq. I was then assigned to a medical review board and summoned to appear last March. Going into the MMRB I was fearful as to what would happen as I was told by everyone that I had talked to that I didnt stand a chance to be recommended to retain. Regardless, I decided to atleast put up a fight and hopefully make some head way for those that followed me. I talked to my endocronologist and submitted myself to a clinical trial involving inhaled insulin, did a lot of research, and found as many talking points as I could to make a point.

The time came and I showed up at my MMRB without representation, which surprised them as most people trying to stay in have a first sergeant or commander along side. Mine however were serving in Iraq at this time, but I did have a former commander offer to come in and say a few words to vouch for my commitment to the Army, and ability to perform in and out of combat. I opted to go alone though, not wanting him to see me in a moment of weakness as I assumed I would be referred for seperation. Ater I had been givin all the opportunity to present myself, and had fielded many questions from the panel I was sent to wait for what seemed to be hours, but I am sure was much less, while the board deliberated. I was called back into the room and told that they had made a decision that had not been an easy one and had not been unanimous. As I prepared for the worst they continued to expail there decision and informed me that they had decided to refer me for full retention. This was a decision that had to be sent up and signed off on by the adjutant general and has taken until 11/08 to be finalized. The board did not place any restriction on my profile but informed me that if my unit was to be deployed in the future, I would noy be allowed to go and again be sent for evaluation by another MMRB, that may not be as favorable to me. As we speak I am still a active member of what I condider to be one of the finest national guard units in the country, but looking for another unit that is less deployable long term.

Although I cannot help in joining the armed forces as a prediagnosed diabetic, I can tell you that there is hope for those in the future. Only 5 years ago that same MMRB would not have even thought about referring me for retention. I wish you the best of luck.
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Avatar_n_tn
I am also a Type 1 diabetic, and have always wanted to serve my country.  I come from a line of Air Force and Army Air Core serviceman, and it's hard not being able to fulfill this dream.  I believe, however, that our military's decision in not allowing diabetics to serve is justified.  Combat and crisis should always be able to be broken down along the chain of command as simply as possible.  Theoretically, EVERY serviceman must be able to pick up a rifle and stand his ground.  Even the private in the middle of Kansas, who spends his days in the galley, preparing meals, must be counted on to defend this soil to the death.  While the possibility that the line cooks in Kansas and the 40-something year old, overweight paper pushers would ever have to dig in and defend themselves are slim-to-none, it's still, fundamentally, the reason our military exists-- to defend to the last man. All complications should be avoided, and thus, why the military at this time barres enlistment.  
The outlook for the future is bright, however.  I believe with current medical advancements, that a diabetic will soon be able to pick up a rifle and do his duty.  

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Avatar_n_tn
I am a life-long insulin dependent diabetic.  For a while I have had the sole desire of serving my country in the military.  I have been encouraged by some of the stories posted here, and I am fully commited to the many medical advances which may help us all fulfill our dreams.

In addition, I believe that diabetics should equally have the right to give their lives for their country.  While there is a greater risk with insulin dependent diabetics, it is no greater a risk than being sent overseas to fight a war.  If I were to die because of a low in combat or for some other reason related to diabetes, I would be satisfied that I at least served my country and tried to do my duty.  But I will say that I could never bear it if someone in my unit lost their life to save me because I had a low.

Because of this, I think that our best chances are to fight for a cure, and fight for better ways to control our diabetes.  I sincerely believe we are not far away from being able to join the military in active combat duty.  Technology and medicine is advancing and I will personally submit myself to help find advances and maybe even a cure in the hope that I can enlist before I turn 29
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Avatar_n_tn
Fair?? How can you say it isn't fair to the rest of the soldiers that a type 1 diabetic gets preferential treatment because the don't have to be put in a combat situation.
What's fair about being forced to deal, through no fault of your own, with a disease that forces someone to lose their right to serve... in whatever capacity.
If a private company decides not to hire a type 1 diabetic they are in violation of American Disability Act, BUT or government can violate this because they would  have to place these soldiers outside of combat zones.
I think there are some dangerous places that are still considered "outside" the combat zone. Lets face it not one person in the World Trade Center on 9-11 thought they were in a combat zone but by 9-12-01 that's exactly what NYC looked like.

Lets call a spade a spade, the government is worried about the health care costs of diabetics in the military, watch how quick they start taking type one diabetics in non-combat AND combat positions once universal healthcare passes the house.

FamilyNP2009
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I understand being an army wife that to get any military position (even paper pusher) you need to do a  basic training course in the field, thus making it difficult to check your sugars when your rucking around, basically ruffing it in the woods. That might be why.
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Avatar_n_tn
Joining the discussion late but I will chime in anyway.  For the diabetics wanting to join the military but can't, just visit your area Police Department's websites to see what thier requirements are for becoming a police officer.  Many PD's will accept diabetics while others will not, you just have to see which ones make diabetes a concern.  I know of many Type 1 diabetics who serve as police officers, firefighters, and paramedics.  Believe me, you can do it. I am a type one diabetic and am currently in process for the position of Boder Patrol Agent. I passed the fitness test and I am just waiting for my medical test to clear.  I know of many people who are diabetic and serving their country in the Border Patrol or any law enforcement for that matter. Just keep your numbers down and your physical activity up.  Law enfrocement is a great way to serve your community and country and hopefully I will be able to do that in a few short months if all goes well.
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Hey to everyone on this forum if you want to get in look up sfc. Mark Thompson.He was sent to iraq for a full tour(12 months) on shots because his pump was crushed by his armor but he is living proof that nothing is impossible and it can be done.I am also a type 1 diabetic and i want to go to the infantry and right now my role model is sfc. mark thompson.If anyone finds further information on the situation contact me please. ***@****
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Avatar_n_tn
Iam a type one diabetic, since i was little i wanted too join The Marine corp i was diagnose 03/08 i really wanna join the miltary reading this blog really makes me feel good inside cause now I know that theur are other people out there just like I really hope one day we all get a chance and prove our goverment wrong may God bless us all!
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Avatar_n_tn
I am a midshipman at the United Naval Academy. Last May I was hospitalized for Type 1 Diabetes. When I was tested, my blood sugar was so high that the meter only said "High". It was later revealed that my blood sugar level was 1350, and my A1C was 14.5. Because of my extreme physical fitness, I managed to carry on for 3 to 5 months (I must have gotten sick sometime in January) without anyone noticing. Infact, it was my mother who noticed something was wrong, none of my shipmates.
As for being cutoff from insulin, I was cutoff (so to speak) for 5 or so months and I was able to operate effectively, so I believe that us diabetics can serve and exced the expectations of military doctors.
After talking with my commanders and medical personal, I am allowed to finish my time here and graduate. After graduation I have the choice of serving in the Merchant Marine Fleet, or being discharged. This is a bit of a blow to me, I had always wanted to be a Navy pilot. But I will make due with what I have and will most likely serve the Merchant Marine fleet with the same standards and dedication that I would in the US Navy.

My best advice is fight and never back down. The fact that so many diabetics wish to serve but cannot embodies the true spirit of America, and that is something that should never be lost.
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Avatar_m_tn
http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-forecast/jul2005/back.jsp
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Avatar_n_tn
Well your right chic192, there are both police officers and fire fighters who are diabetics, type I or II.  One issue of discrimination that I've been dealing with is the issue of where when you get evaluated for the pd position, some departments (most of the departments in my area) give higher points or scores automatically because of a person having prior military service. With a lot of people getting out of the military now and the economy being so bad, things are very tight job wise as you all know.  To me, that's a form of discrimination that I can't get other kinds of jobs that would be similar because of this issue of something that I can't get into because of a preexisting condition to have a better score.  I'm always at a disadvantage score wise and will never be in the top 10 to be considered because of this. I've lost around 120lbs, done tons of exercise to get myself ready for these things, but, feel as though that I'm already put down into a lower level because of this, thus having to have other things on my resume to even have someone think about me.  

I still think that it would be nice if there wasn't something like the home guard around the states like the UK had during WWII, except, have a test group run of people that still needed to meet physical requirements etc. and other things with people that are type I and or II diabetics.  Heck I can't even be considered for anything in a military music program because of this but I know I could do the work that those people do without much issue, I just think that everyone who's seen this on here just wants an unbiased chance, and equal opportunity.  I come across situations all the time where its best not to tell people until specific situations occur that your diabetic because people get really weird, then
making you feel like your some sort of alien or something.  I can't stand that....

Previous post quote:
".Joining the discussion late but I will chime in anyway.  For the diabetics. wanting to join the military but can't, just visit your area Police Departm.ent's websites to see what thier requirements are for becoming a police officer.  Many PD's will accept diabetics while others will not, you just have to see which ones make diabetes a concern.  I know of many Type 1 diabetics who serve as police officers, firefighters, and paramedics.  Believe me, you can do it. I am a type one diabetic and am currently in process for the position of Boder Patrol Agent. I passed the fitness test and I am just waiting for my medical test to clear.  I know of many people who are diabetic and serving their country in the Border Patrol or any law enforcement for that matter. Just keep your numbers down and your physical activity up.  Law enfrocement is a great way to serve your community and country and hopefully I will be able to do that in a few short months if all goes well."
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Avatar_n_tn
I pray day an night, that God will speak to   Generals & Admirals, in the military an President Obama, regarding diabetics of whatever Type to join the military. I believe Diabetics should be allowed to join the military, but on certain conditions, such as, Diabetics can't go to war, but serve in other types of military duties, such as assisting Admirals & Generals an etc........
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1129347_tn?1260034147
Dear TShelton,

I am also a diabetic and facing the fight to get into the military. However, I am not backing down. I meet all physical requirements and exceed them. Plus I'm wanting to be in the Nurse Corps. My plan is to propose this problem to our president and the secretary of defense to check on a solution / way that personnel with certain medical condition can serve our great country in uniform.
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Avatar_n_tn
Here's an interesting link to someone who became diabtetic later in the us army and his issues.

http://www.dlife.com/dlifeTv/v537026862-Mark-Thompson.html
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Avatar_m_tn
wats up ppl, im anthony kirsch i also have diabetes, im on the pump, im from pa, and ever since i was like 3 all i wanted to do is to join the marines, im goin on 17 now and i still want to join, honestly its more than a dream to me, i know i herd a story about a guy with type 1 diabetes who went over and fought in afganistan, i saw it on tv a while back, is it maybe possible if i talk to the right recruiter they will let me in, plz feel free to give any peice of advice i would greatly appreciate it

thanx
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Avatar_m_tn
Hey all...I stumbled onto this website and am intrigued by the conversations. I am now 27, but at age 22 I graduated from Marine OCS in Quantico, VA. During the first few days before pickup at OCS you go through several medical tests including a blood test. Mine was standard (regular blood sugar reading). However, after graduating from the 10 week program in the PLC program I went back to school for a semester before obtaining my commission and heading to TBS The basic school, back in quanitico, then onto flight school in Pensecola. I graduated from OCS in Sept. and was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in late Oct. after a few low blood sugar episodes that prompted me to go to the doctor. The BIGGEST mistake I made was telling my OSO Officer Selection Officer about my condition. Within just a few weeks, I received papers saying that I turned down my commission (which was allowed because of the program that I was in) and that I was discharged. I never indicated that I wanted out, I was forced out. Since I technically was not on active duty at the time, the marines were able to get away with giving me no benefits. My bitterness is mostly gone and I still love the Corps, but here is some real life proof that even though I was 2 months away from getting pinned an officer, spent an entire summer training to become a marine, and knew that even with diabetes, I was still able to run a first class PFT, I was immediately discharged because I was insulin dependent.
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Avatar_m_tn
Has anyone found any way in?
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Avatar_m_tn
I think it is a crime not to let diabetics serve for thier country. We have the right to make america a better country just like everyone else. I would do anything to make this country a safer and better place to live if I could only get the chance. Even though I can't join right now doesn't mean I won't fight for my right to be a proud american and serve my country. I would do anything for my country. And plan on fighting this discrimination.
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Avatar_m_tn
Yeah your right. we are in danger, butif your in that position you were and ARE aready in danger. And what doesit matter if you are willing to die for your people. im 14 years old and i wanted to be in the USAF since a little child.. but i was told i had diabetes on september 17,2009 a day i wont ever forget.
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I am also a diabetic on the pump and all i have aver wanted to do is fight for my contry in the royal navy , i was diagnosed on halowene 2006 and it didant seem like a big deal at the time but now i am 14soon to be 15 i have realized it is a bigger issue than i have thaught . i have been training for about 2 years now trying to get in for when i am 16 and now i find out that i can not do it . my dreams just shatter infromt of me . what happend to the saying "nothing is impossible" well obviosoly this it apparently i can not see why we cannot serve in a non - combat possition , if i want to serve my contry i cannot see why i cannot do it and take care of myself it is my choice to make the descision not theres !
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Avatar_m_tn
I think they should take a group of diabetics in tip top physical condition and put them in their own unit and see how things work.  When the military finds out you have diabetes they act like you dont have legs or something.  People act like you cant shoot a rifle or run or dig trenches if you diabetic.  I have shot AK47 SkS M16 and many other guns. I can also run well. i wanted to get in the Navy seals.  Everyone acts like you extremaly need insulin, you need it to keep your sugar low, so if you dont want to get a low in battle dont take insulin during battle.  Exercising will help keep you sugar low, in the military all you do is exercise!  Now that i cant jion the seals i think ill be a cop or border control.  I think the military is scared to see diabetics in the military doing well so they would never make a unit of diabetic soldires,  they dont want to see that we can do it and we can do it better than many people.  What happens when normal people stop joing the militay and the only one who want to join are us.  We must stand together and fight for justic.  ask them to make a test group of diabetic soldiers.  I bet my life they will do better than any othersoilder out their.  Keep fighting, dont give up!!!!
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The Only reason that the military wouldn't want a diabetic around is because of this. The military job your in, desk job or not; gets attacked/invaded. your blood pumps, your adrenaline rushes, and now your BG is dropping. your unit needs your help or they might die and now your just another soldier needing rescue and you aren't even wounded. You simply become another asset. its not discriminatory. its them not wanting to take the chance that when the diabetic is really needed that his BG is so off target that he cant do his job. I myself am a diabetic. diagnosed at 11 years old. Now I'm 19 and wishing that i could be on the frontlines of the marines with my 2 best friends. our lifelong dream. Every time i think of how i cant be in the military i just think of what would happen if i was in a combat situation and because of me, my entire squad along with my 2 best friends died. i would never be able to let it down. even after death. I still wish i could be up there following my dream, but not as a risk to my team.
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i am a british sniper for obv reasons i am not telling you my name but the army dose not know i am diabetic, insulin (injection) dependent i had a freind check for me and perscribe the medication and no one finds out my section knows but will not take it further becouse they owe me favers that it how i did it thourght it might help.
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Avatar_f_tn
I am a type 1 diabetic, who had had the disease for 8 years prior to joining the Navy Reserves in 1997.  The day I was to take my physical, I made certain I ate early, drove to Bethesda Medical for my screening--checked my BG before I went it--it was a perfect 90 and that was it.  I had passed that ASVAB test with a perfect score---every branch of the military was calling my house and I didn’t know what was going on.  My recruiter told me about my test score, but was thrilled I chose the Navy.  I chose the Navy because they didn’t make me go to boot camp.  Yes, you are reading this correctly--it was optional.  I told them, I had a busy civilian life and could not commit to being away from home.  I would commit to one weekend per month, but nothing more.  The Navy said okay.  I signed an 8-year contract, fully knowing that I had a trump card to get out and I knew how to use it.
In summary, I don’t want you to put your life in any danger, but at 28 years of age, I was not going to allow anyone to tell me what I could and could not do.  I wanted to join the military and I did; and I did it under my own terms!  The weekends were easier to handle than 24/7, but it's a way to serve, if that's what you really want.  I shopped at the commissary/PX, qualified for my VA loan, which I will be using next month and enjoyed what I did.  Now I'm wearing a pump and unless I tell you I'm a diabetic, you don’t know.  There are plenty of clothing items you can wear that make a pump disappear!
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Avatar_n_tn
I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetis in October 2002,  At that time I had 13 years in the miIitary. To make a long story short, I went through a medical board and was found fit for duty  Since then I got promoted twice,  I was given the opportunity to be medically retired but I am glad I did not take it.  Now I have over 20 years of service.  My plan is to continue to serve as long as I can still do the job.  However there are some frustration involve because there is alot of push back from medical regarding deployment.  It is very difficult to get promoted if you are non deployable.
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It has nothing to do with a diabetics ability to serve... Its about Money! You are a liability from day 1.  I no longer would serve in any capacity for this country. This military/government is not about serving and protecting but taking and profiting... Look at treatment of injured vets.  These oil inspired mis-adventures worldwide... With advances in medicine there is virtually nothing that would preclude a diabetic from serving properly... However giving childhood obesity rates the military will have no choice at some point.. BTW I can't understand why police, fire, border patrol and even DOT(CDL LISC.) would determine insulin dependent diabetics can't perform as expected.  Again I would suspect insurance companies as culprits... Also just wait for REAL war requiring draft...the military will be taking anybody at that time
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Avatar_m_tn
I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 03/2005. In 04/2005 I was eligible to apply to the Canadian Forces.  Same story, told I can not because of my diabetes.  Told I am a risk of sudden incapacitation, and the risk of being without medicine is too great. Well my insulin if refrigerated well keep for over two years. Why can I not just bring a steady supply? No answer... Well you can’t take medicine if your in a bio suit.. umm pump?  There is pumps out now that well continuously monitor blood glucose. Sudden incapacitation gone.
I have worked service rigs for 2 years, anybody who has knows what I’m talking about when I say harder work then you will ever see on any combat arms, by a lot. The shortest shift I ever worked was 12 hours, I was on average gone 18 hours a day for my job. With one break to eat, if there was time. I worked in temperatures from -40, to +45.  I remember one time we worked till 3 am, turned around to start our next shift at 5am. Throughout this career not once did I have an incident, not once did I slow the job because I had to take care of my diabetes,  and my sugars were never out of control.  
The problem is there is too many diabetics in the world who will get in a car accident, “it wasn’t my fault my blood sugar was _______”, get in trouble with police? “It wasn’t my fault my blood sugars were ______”. Do you have a disability you can get an extra grant if you do, “Diabetes”... Every time one of these people use diabetes a crutch, its another nail in the coffin for diabetics who want to join the forces. Diabetics should be given the opportunity to prove themselves, I don’t care how strict you make the standards, how hard it will be. Throughout basic one incident and your out. Who cares, at least then we could try and if you don’t make it well at least you can go home knowing you were given the chance. I for one know my diabetes will not hold me back, I will never stop trying and I WILL make it one day mark my words.
If you don’t think you can do it with diabetes, then don’t. But how dare you tell somebody else they can’t. Every case of diabetes is different, and with 1 in 3 people
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Avatar_m_tn
I am type 1 diabetes turning 16 in September getting interested in military. when i grow up i would like to be a pilot for the military mainly flying a big plain such as a transport plane. they could simply hook up an insulin machine onto the plain or something that i could use, i mean 300ml of insulin lasts like 3-4 days eating more than 4 times a day for me. so imagine how long 1 gallon of insulin could last if i paced eating meals especially.

Even so it doesn't look like america would accept me and that plane i would want to fly is European and maybe i can fly for them. But i don't think nonmilitary planes that carry passengers are diabetic discrimination even thought that would be boring as hell. Just flying the military transport plane domestically in america would be good enough i just wanna fly something big. But this really doesn't look like its going to get anywhere so im going to have to look into other things in reality unfortunately.

Maybe if the government pushed more for a cure or something for longer lasting technology there would be more capabilities for us.

23.6 million children and adults in the United States—7.8% of the population—have diabetes. Now im going to guess that about a quarter or less has found interest in the military but decided to turn away to the losing fight and considering theres only about 1.25million military personnel in the US out of a 350 million+ population they could easily more than double the number or military service by accepting diabetics. And the way i see it China has almost 2.5billion population and allies with north Korea who might declare war therefore making us extremely outnumbered and the government is choosing the right time to be discriminating huh?

is any of this irrational thinking let me know to this account but im currently only 15 and i know better.
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Avatar_n_tn
Im a 22 year old that has had Type 1 diabetes since i was 19. I was graduating highscool. I got a 89 on the ASVAB with a hangover. All my friends went off to the military after school. i was stuck at home. I wanted to join the Marines, like my dad. I wanted to join up for 2 years and then come home to be an Ohio State Highway Patrolman. Like my dad. He is retired now but was a Captain at the time(perfect refference) But then i found out i was a diabetic. Military wont even look at me. Law enforcement is out too. It *****. Something i really wanted to do in life. It really does suck that we cant join. An yeah one vial of Humolog is like 1000 units. like 6 incontrol diabetics could run off that or a month i think. I dont even use that much in a month. As for our own unit i would like to see it happen. Or us just getting desk jobs. But that isnt what we want either is it? We would like to be "created equall". We for the most part are just as healthy if not more so than the average guy. The only true way to be healthy is to develop a chronic illness and then take really good care of it.

Oh and when world war 3 breaks out and they reinstate the draft keep in mind we will be taking care of your gf's and making our own little race of diabetics while your gone :) lol jk Support our troops! Change the law. Give us a chance.
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Avatar_m_tn
No doubt!
It is funny how these stupid rules in the military prevent many worthy diabetics from joining!
Before I was diagnose at the age of 22 (now I am 28). I was training with a recruiter in the Army. I did all of their P.T. tests and passed with flying colors. I was going to be enlisted as a Special Forces soldier or Green Beret; pending I completed training.
Not 2 months later, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. So unfortunately, there went my future career in the military. I was devastated, but I was determined to not let the disease control me, I was going to control it. So I exercised almost everyday and had a strict diet. I actually was off insulin for 2 years! But then had a lot of stress and family issues arise, which caused me to get back on insulin. I only take 1 shot of lantus at night! I mountain climb, surf, hike, camp and hunt. I even went elk hunting for about a week and accidentally left my insulin at home. My blood sugars averaged about 140, but for the most part I was fine. I have played college hockey and almost played pro! So if a diabetic can play college hockey, then why can't a diabetic join the military!!!
Look at Michael Phelps. He is a type 1 diabetic and has won the most gold medals than any other American athlete. I am sure somebody like Michael Phelps could make it through basic training and beyond.
It really sickens me that people automatically assume that diabetics cannot take care of themselves. Everybody is different and or created different. I never wish this burden upon any able-pancreas person.
I have met and talked to more type 1 diabetics that are healthier than most of my non-diabetic friends and family. I am sure that the military wont "kick" somebody out if they have a headaches and have to take Tylenol!
The military should investigate a persons regulations of blood sugars and then make a desicsion on whether they can join the military or not.
This is bull &*@@#. Give us a chance!!!
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Avatar_f_tn
My life long dream was and still is to serve my country.  I participated in ROTC for three years in college, took my DODMERB and there was nothing more soul-crushing than the day I received the letter that I had been rejected.  Why?  I was rejected for two things, one of which can be easily waived, however, I was rejected mostly because of my ADD medication which they put down as "academic skills defects" or some crap like that.  Calling me retarded would've been nicer.  Why don't they want kids who are medicated for ADD/ADHD?  Do they think we'll distribute the meds?  No offense, but diabetes is a lot worse on the grounds of disqualification/discharge than that.  I can understand the front line stuff, but there are a lot more opportunities behind the front lines for these issues.  I don't even want combat arms, I'd be perfectly comfortable in supply or something like that.

However, I do know a diabetic in the military and in combat arms.  I will not disclose name, rank, branch, or MOS.  If he is still in, how in the neck hasn't he been discharged.  I have seen him on his bad days with this tragic condition and it shocks me that he was allowed in/not discharged.

A young man I know just completed basic training and there was a recovering heroin addict in his company.  Granted, he had been through the worst part of detox, but he would still experience some withdrawals while at basic training.

I don't get it, I just don't get it.  Do you have to be genetically engineered to be considered for service to your country?  Its a joke and it breaks my heart to see so many people denied service for the most inane reasons.  
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My husband a diabetic since 9 months old would love to be in the military not only to serve his country but to better support his family, him being the soul provider for our family, but since he is a diabetic from 9 months old he cant,was that his choice to be a diabetic NO an since he has had diabetes basically since birth he knows how to controll his levels also can tell u exactly what his reading will be, he is now a tow truck driver but can not get his CDL because he is a diabetic even though he can operate all the machinery an trucks that NON diabetics can, I have had high blood pressure since the age of 11 an can get a CDL , so whats the difference a person with hypertension can just as easily have a stroke while driving or for military being in combat, now days there is more an more diseases that will be a factor of disqualifications for the military an soon there will be no perfect person an they will have to resort to the ones with these diseases!
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Avatar_m_tn
Im in on the fighting for our chance to fight. I am 19 and have been a type 1 diabetic since I was 7. Its tough but I have tremendous control and I play Division 1 football. My father is a retired Colonel and my brother is serving over seas today. I would give the world to serve for our United States Marine Corps. I am in on this fight.

let me know if you find anything out.
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Avatar_m_tn
i am a type 1 diabetic i have had it since i was 9 and am now turnng 20 i have always wanted to serve my country i have always been in shape my whole life and have been turend down by over 15 recruters. what i dont understand most people are woried about our blood going low all they have to do is give us a couple eppe pens that bring your blood up in a matter or minutes and most people can tell when they are getting low before it is dangerous ley low i thnk that they are just afaride we will out work all of the i guess yyou could call them normal people lol but i am never going to quite trying to get in if any of you have any information on how to get in email me ***@**** fell free to write whatever.
always consinder yourself unstopable.
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Avatar_m_tn
The fact that citizens with diabetes cannot participate in war does seem to be discriminative. However, when looked at logically, the chances of type I diabetic even surviving basic PT would not seem likely. How are you going to be able to sustain your blood sugar without the proper sustenance at hand?? Diabetes is a complex disease that requires the constant monitoring and adjustment of blood sugar. Marines are purposefully starved and deprived of nutrition to condition their bodies for the lack of when the time comes. Food is always limited. Supplies are always limited.
If a "type I diabetic" marine, were behind enemy lines and, unexpectedly, a situation occurred the rendered you without medication, you'd better pray to God some support comes in within the next five hours or so....the support which had to be called in due on your own personal problem separate from mission. And by God you haven't even caught a bullet yet. lol
In layman's terms you'd be considered more of a hindrance to the mission, not an asset.
I have been type I diabetic for over 13 years. To my knowledge, it is medically impossible for a diabetic to physically and mentally push his/her limits without the proper medicinal assistance.
The American Police Force, however, does allow Type I diabetics to act as officers because they do not guarantee that an officer will ever see such hostile action that would separate the individual from his/her medication..............
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Avatar_n_tn
I am in the army and have been for almost 8 years.  my dad recently got diagnosed with diabetes and i recently showed some possible symptoms of diabetes. my dad decided to test my BG and i came up extremly high so when i get back from my 2 weeks leave from iraq i am going to ask the military to test me.  I will let you all know what they do to a 3 time iraq vet while he is deployed with diabetes.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello,

I'm not an American citizen but still a person who wants to serve his country. I'm from The Netherlands and i got diagnosed with type 1 in 2009. It came out while i was having my medical check for the military. I passed every test till they tested my urine, which  showed high levels of sugar. After being send to my local docter to do a full blood test it was sure i had developed type 1 diabetes. After he send the results of my test to the medic staff that handled my application i was send a letter, explaining that i was not allowed to join active duty because i could be a risk if they could not supply the insulin needed.

Now i'm a fit person and i have my diabetes under control. I inject insuline 3 times a-day (1 is a 24 hour insulin that has to be done every day, the other 2 are a short working type and can be used if you eat too many carbs -> Snacks and so on) I can easily live with the 24 hour shot once a day if i move around.

I really agree with FellowT1 his post. Some of us do not need to inject much insuline to have a normal blood sugar. exercising can help keep our blood sugar regular and stay in shape for our positions should they give us a chance.

Reading some of the posts places here brought my hope up and i'll keep fighting to make them give us diabetics a chance to serve.
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Avatar_n_tn
I am reading your comment about siding with the military that you think diabetics should not be allowed in the military and i think you are totally ridiculous. My son is a Type 1 diabetic and i am doing research because he wants to go into the military. I cannot believe that they won't allow diabetics in the military. As long as they have the pump they would be fine. Our government and people like you are really messed up!
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Avatar_n_tn
Guys go to the department of defense site (DOD) an put in your request, i'll bet you, if we get enough guys say something things will change
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Avatar_f_tn
After 4 years at Duke on a Navy ROTC scholarship, my child now owes $140,000 in reimbursement to govt because on final medical exam she had elevated blood sugar (not diabetic range) She was medically disqualified and not allowed to be commissioned- 4 years of school and navy classes. Once called an act of god as it was no fault of hers now navy wants reimbursement.
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Avatar_m_tn
Stupid question how did u bring insulin when u were in the military
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Avatar_m_tn
See, that is were you are wrong. As a type I diabetic in a military academy for high school. I am more then capable of keeping up with the "regular" people. In fact, I am in better shape then most the school. I was one of 3 cadets to run a half-marathon in with no complications from my diabetes what so ever.

so you can respectfully shove that **** up your own ***
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Avatar_f_tn
My dream has always been to be a marine ever since I was a young girl. I'm a sophomore in high school I got ym gym membership and have been working out I planned to enlist at 17 as a senior in high school nearly 2 years away when just 2 weeks ago I was diagnosied with type 1 diabets. I also would love to fight this I understand why they won't allow us to enlist but I really think they need to work on this! I'm in the best condition of my life I can mske it through the trainig but because I'm a diabetic I can't serve my country? So I can absolutely relate to you and how you feel and it's not fair what so ever hopefully the military can work on this or hopefully they find a cure for diabetes.
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Avatar_m_tn
http://www.****.org/petitions/u-s-department-of-defense-allow-diabetics-to-serve-in-non-combat-positions-in-the-military

Lets change things then!!!!
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Avatar_m_tn
Totally agree!!
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Avatar_m_tn
Has anyone ever thought about starting a petition about letting diabetics join the army or air force in a support role. It's happened before with other medical problems we just need to get the army's attention and show them that even with diabetes we could still be a valuable resource in support roles.

http://www.****.org

P.S, diabetics can join the Civil air patrol i myself am a staff sergeant also we can join the coast guard auxiliary and the state defense forces
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Avatar_m_tn
try the us militia
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Avatar_m_tn
I started this petition, and hope everyone will spread the word!! :)

http://www.change.org/petitions/u-s-department-of-defense-allow-diabetics-to-serve-in-non-combat-positions-in-the-military
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Avatar_m_tn
everybody needs to sign this
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Avatar_f_tn
i am 13 and i have type 1 diabetes, i was diagnosed when i was 7. My dream is to join the Navy and fight for my country. And i agree, they should split us like they did with the black and whites. That way we can join!
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Avatar_f_tn
I just shared this on my facebook, the petition for letting diabetics in the military in non-combat positions. I hope it helps, the count went from 141 to 142 or something :-) share it on your facebook!!

http://www.change.org/petitions/u-s-department-of-defense-allow-diabetics-to-serve-in-non-combat-positions-in-the-military#
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Avatar_f_tn
I am an Army veteran, and as such I hoped one of my children would be interested in the military too. Of my three children, I have a 13 yr old daughter with the drive, personality and intelligence to do any job the military has. She was diagnosed at 12 with type 1 diabetes. In the ICU the endocrinologist was helping us come to grips with this life long change. When she said there is nothing my daughter can't do with diabetes but join the military, I was crushed.
    The high school had a college fair yesterday and my daughter went to check out the military booth. She is upset about her exclusion. I have seen both sides of the coin, and understand both. As a soldier with the Engineers of the 82nd Airborne Battalion during the hostage crisis in 1979, one of my supervisors had epilepsy. So why epilepsy and not diabetes? Perhaps he was diagnosed after enlisting, I don't know. It is what it is. Although I am sad for my daughter, she has a world of opportunities ahead of her. I have told her about the civilian opportunities but that is a job, not a life vision. All I can tell her is the better the education, the more options she will have open up for her in her life. If it leads her to some government/military connection, great. Life is about adjusting on the fly, those who can, will always find their way. Grieve for the loss, and do your best to find your way. Good luck.
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Avatar_m_tn
Reading these comments help in a way, as I know I am not alone. The militray is being unfair and discriminating towards diabetics, I live in the UK and since I was 16 I wanted to join the army as a chef but I felt I wasnt quite ready then half through college I was exciting couldnt wait to  it had finished to start a new chapter in my life. I studied three years to become a chef at a catering college.. trainning and working for experience. I finished my three year course on the 20th of June this year and by 23rd I was in hospital type 1 diabeitc.. There was two things running through my head that made me angry. 1 I would have to inject Insulin for the rest of my life. 2 I knew all hope to do what I wanted to do was gone. And nobody understands.. my family didn't want me to join.. but they didnt understand the dreams that I had are now shattered..  Now I hate everything about cooking I feel like Its a waste of time now. I just think Imm classed as a 2nd class citizen and dont have the same oppertunities that people with out diabetes do.
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Avatar_m_tn
What ver happened after u were tested?  Friend do mine in military for 6 yrs.  now diagnosed with type 1.  Is it possible to stay in and just not be deployed?
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Avatar_m_tn
I am a type one diabetic and currently serve he great state of Ohio with the Ohio Military reserve! It is the reserfve unit for the Ohio National Guard that cannot get deployed federal. It is the State militia, but do not let that full you. THIS IS THE MILITARY! We are the 6th brig. of the Ohio National guard, go by ALL ARMY CODES AND REG, we drill one weekend a month, have AT and do everything the guard does along with training side by side with them. You cannot legally be deployed over seas. You do not get paid for drills, only if your state deploys you. And if you are deployed it is at the state level. Are main purpose is to protect our state, in case of a natural or man made disaster. THis is the military, I have great pride in serving. I am not looking for a pay check but jsut hte opritunity to serve our county. I am 23 years old and use to be in law enforcement also for those who have said you cannot become a police officer with type 1. Almsot every state has a State Defense force. Please contact me at josh roby att at gmail *******. my # is 4408583892 if any one has any questions. Ohio currently excepts any one from the age of 17-65 also.
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