Digestive Disorders / Gastroenterology Expert Forum
PLEASE HELP WITH INTERPRETING BLOOD WORK RESULTS
About This Forum:

This is a place to ask questions about digestive problems and receive a personal answer from a highly qualified doctor. You will also find support from other members who share your interest in digestive disorders. Digestive Disorders include: Anal and Rectal problems, Barrett’s Esophagus, Bleeding in the Stomach and Digestive Tract, Constipation, Crohn’s Disease, Gastritis, GERD, Heartburn, Proctitis, Short Bowel Syndrome, Ulcers, Whipple’s Disease, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (and many more).

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

PLEASE HELP WITH INTERPRETING BLOOD WORK RESULTS

Has anyone heard of AGAP on a print out of their lab work up, what is it and why do the test for it?
Related Discussions
2 Comments
Blank
28293_tn?1213140550
I would think that AGAP would be "Anion Gap".

Here's what Anion Gap is:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://carbonbased.com/cbcblood.htm

Ratios

ANION GAP (Sodium + Potassium - CO2 - Chloride)

The anion gap is used to measure the concentration of cations (sodium and potassium) and the anions (chloride and CO2) in the extracellular fluid of the blood.
There are numerous clinical implications that can be gathered from the Anion Gap.
An increased measurement is associated with metabolic acidosis due to the overproduction of acids (a state of alkalinity is in effect).
Decreased levels may indicate metabolic alkalosis due to the overproduction of alkaloids (a state of acidosis is in effect).

Normal Adult Range: 4 - 14 (calculated)
Optimal Adult Value: 9

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.neosoft.com/~uthman/lab_test.html

Anion gap

Increased serum anion gap reflects the presence of unmeasured anions, as in uremia (phosphate, sulfate), diabetic ketoacidosis (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate), shock, exercise-induced physiologic anaerobic glycolysis, fructose and phenformin administration (lactate), and poisoning by methanol (formate), ethylene glycol (oxalate), paraldehyde, and salicylates.
Therapy with diuretics, penicillin, and carbenicillin may also elevate the anion gap.

Decreased serum anion gap is seen in dilutional states and hyperviscosity syndromes associated with paraproteinemias. Because bromide is not distinguished from chloride in some methodologies, bromide intoxication may appear to produce a decreased anion gap.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hope this helps
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Thankyou so much, Yes, it was anion GAP, Do you happen to know if a high, but not too high, anion GAP of 16 could have anything to do with an arrythmia?
Blank
28293_tn?1213140550
I honestly don't know. (sorry)
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
This Forum's Experts
351246_tn?1379685732
Dr. Kokil MathurBlank
Consultant
,
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank