Digestive Disorders / Gastroenterology Expert Forum
VOMITTING
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This is a place to ask questions about digestive problems and receive a personal answer from a highly qualified doctor. You will also find support from other members who share your interest in digestive disorders. Digestive Disorders include: Anal and Rectal problems, Barrett’s Esophagus, Bleeding in the Stomach and Digestive Tract, Constipation, Crohn’s Disease, Gastritis, GERD, Heartburn, Proctitis, Short Bowel Syndrome, Ulcers, Whipple’s Disease, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (and many more).

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VOMITTING

MY BABY RIGHT NOW IS 4 YEARS OLD, RIGHT NOW SHE IS STAY IN THE HOSPITAL, IT IS 2ND TIME SHE GO HOSPITAL, BECAUSE SHE KEEPS VOMITTING AROUND ONE WEEK. SHE HAS DONE ALL THE TEST, CT.SCOPE TEST.X0RAY... NOTHING WRONHG HAS BEEN FOUND.
WE REALLY WORRY ABOUT IT, AND ALSO MY BABY SUFFERS FROM VOMITTING, WE REALLY WANT TO KNOW HOW SHE GET THIS PROBLEM, HOW TO TREAT HER, HOW WE CAN DO TO STOP HER VOMITTING, HOW WE CAN TO CONTROL HER VOMITTING IN THE NEXT TIME.
PLEASE GIVE ME ANY ADVERTISE.
THANK YOU,

I WAIT FOR YOUR ANSWER.

HER MONTHER SACHIKO
Related Discussions
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Multiple disorders may present with vomiting in older infants in children. By far the most common is gastroenteritis. However, GERD, mechanical obstruction, Munchausen syndrome by proxy, intracranial masses, peptic ulcer disease, and cyclic vomiting also may be diagnostic considerations.

Prolonged vomiting (>12 hours in a neonate, >24 hours in children younger than two years of age, or >48 hours in older children) should not be ignored. Screening laboratories should include a complete blood count, electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, urinalysis, urine culture, and stool studies for occult blood, leukocytes, and parasites. Additional testing should be based upon the history and physical examination.

Patients should be referred to a pediatric gastroenterologist or other appropriate specialist (eg, pediatric surgeon, neurologist) when there are symptoms or physical findings that are of particular concern. These include an abnormal neurologic exam, peritoneal signs on abdominal examination, severe abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, or significant weight loss. Immediate pediatric surgical consultation is warranted if appendicitis, bowel obstruction, or bowel perforation are suspected.

Followup with your personal physician is essential.

This answer is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice - the information presented is for patient education only. Please see your personal physician for further evaluation of your individual case.

Thanks,
Kevin, M.D.
3 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
maybe she has some kind of reflux, if that's the case i'm pretty sure there's pills to prevent it.
i'm am not a doctor, just someone with some advice.
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Avatar_n_tn
Bibliography:
Carter, et al.  Approach to the child with nausea and vomiting.  UptoDate, 2004.
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Avatar_n_tn
she could have some type of food allergy causing this or there could be a mechanical problem such as an intermittent obstruciton...she would need a barium swallow to check her intestines.....hopefully the drs will solve this
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