Digestive Disorders / Gastroenterology Expert Forum
regards to Leasa's post 7\11\02
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This is a place to ask questions about digestive problems and receive a personal answer from a highly qualified doctor. You will also find support from other members who share your interest in digestive disorders. Digestive Disorders include: Anal and Rectal problems, Barrett’s Esophagus, Bleeding in the Stomach and Digestive Tract, Constipation, Crohn’s Disease, Gastritis, GERD, Heartburn, Proctitis, Short Bowel Syndrome, Ulcers, Whipple’s Disease, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (and many more).

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regards to Leasa's post 7\11\02

As I posted, I too had the same symptoms. And have had for at least a year, off and on. I have went to doctor after doctor. Just Gastritis.

I was tested for Cushings and that come back all good. My doc test me for Helicobacter Pylori and it is positive. From what I understand ( and correct me if I am wrong) but this bacteria has just been discovered recently.
My stomach is so swollen that I look 8 months pregnant. I am so bloated, have gain a lot of weight and hurt like hell. This last episode was the worse.
I am now going to start on Biaxin XL 500ml 3x daily, and 40ml of Prilosec for 2 wks. Then I will go to 20ml of Prilosec, and after that I don't know. But from what I understand it is a long regiment to kill this thing. And from my understanding I have probably had this for a couple of years. That is scary. A germ living in my stomach. yuk.

I am looking forward to the results. It has been a long time coming, believe me.

Any one with more info or questions about my symptoms, let me hear from you.....
Good luck to you all,
Loretta
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Hold on a minute here. My understanding is that we all have the Pylori bacteria embedded deep in our stomach lining. It is just that yours is acting up. In which case a normal treatment of antibiotics would be called for. No big thing here. I am willing to bet that there are more ondiscovered bacteria doing there thing down there, and more. Please let me know if you think I am out in left field here.
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General Epidemiology History Animals Famous People Stocks

Helicobacter pylori
General Information
Helicobacter pylori is a spiral shaped bacterium that lives in the stomach and duodenum (section of intestine just below stomach). It has a unique way of adapting in the harsh environment of the stomach.

The inside of the stomach is bathed in about half a gallon of gastric juice every day. Gastric juice is composed of digestive enzymes and concentrated hydrochloric acid, which can readily tear apart the toughest food or microorganism. Bacteria, viruses, and yesterdays steak dinner are all consumed in this deadly bath of chemicals. It used to be thought that the stomach contained no bacteria and was actually sterile, but Helicobacter pylori changed that.

The stomach is protected from its own gastric juice by a thick layer of mucus that covers the stomach lining. Helicobacter pylori takes advantage of this protection by living in the mucus lining.


Urea hydrolysis: urea is broken down to ammonia and carbon dioxide
Once H. pylori is safely ensconced in the mucus, it is able to fight the stomach acid that does reach it with an enzyme it possesses called urease. Urease converts urea, of which there is an abundant supply in the stomach (from saliva and gastric juices), into bicarbonate and ammonia, which are strong bases. This creates a cloud of acid neutralizing chemicals around the H. pylori, protecting it from the acid in the stomach. The reaction of urea hydrolysis is important for diagnosis of H.pylori by the breath test.


Gram stain of H. Pylori
Another defense H. pylori has is that the body's natural defenses cannot reach the bacterium in the mucus lining of the stomach. The immune system will respond to an H. pylori infection by sending white cells, killer T cells, and other infection fighting agents. However, these potential H. pylori eradicators cannot reach the infection, because they cannot easily get through stomach lining. They do not go away either, though, and the immune response grows and grows. Polymorphs die, and spill their destructive compounds (superoxide radicals) on stomach lining cells. Extra nutrients are sent to reinforce the white cells, and the H. pylori can feed on this. within a few days, gastritis and perhaps eventually a peptic ulcer results. It may not be H. pylori itself which causes peptic ulcer, but the inflammation of the stomach lining; i.e. the response to H. pylori.


H. Pylori causing a neutrophil reaction (active chronic gastritis) in the lining (mucosa) of the stomach
H. pylori is believed to be transmitted orally. Many researchers think that H, pylori is transmitted orally by means of fecal matter through the ingestion of waste tainted food or water. In addition, it is possible that H. pylori could be transmitted from the stomach to the mouth through gastro-esophagal reflux (in which a small amount of the stomach's contents is involuntarily forced up the esophagus) or belching, common symptoms of gastritis. The bacterium could then be transmitted through oral contact.


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here is a little more of the cut and paste,
H. pylori usually is contracted in childhood, perhaps through food, water, or close contact with an infected individual. This infectious disease is more common in adults older than age 60 and is also more common in developing countries. Most people with h. pylori don't display any symptoms until they are older. In fact, they may go through life unaware that they have the bacterium. Although h. pylori usually doesn't cause problems in childhood, if left untreated it can cause gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and even stomach cancer later in life.
I wish you good luck and good health!
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Thank you Virgo. I have learned a thing or two today, and that always helps.
Buzzard... Out in left field? I must be there with you..LOL...

I have been dealing with this thing for so long, I am just glad that I have found out what it is and that I can take meds for it.

Ready to get back in my clothes....

Everyone have a great day, and good luck to you all....
Loretta
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Your are very welcome..a day is never wasted if we learn a thing or two :o)
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