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Clavamox ?


My almost 9 month puppy has high ALT Liver scores (500 range)  I had a ultrasound done very recently & everything came back normal.  The vet put him on Clavamox for 14 days & afterwards will re-test.   I heard that Clavamox can make his ALT Levels increase not decrease?  Is this true?  
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1436598_tn?1332900133
I just did a bunch of google searches to try to help, and have not found anything that suggests clavamox increases ALT.  My 14 yo pit bull has been on maximum doses of first rimadyl and currently metacam for severe OA and RA, so she is monitored for liver issues.  She has taken clavamox for other infections during this time and has never had a problem.

Can you tell us where you heard or saw this info?

~~ dgg
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A doctor (pathologist) I work with told me that there could be a chance that Clavamox would increase his ALT levels.  

Thank you so much for your response, greatly appreciated.  

I am hoping that Clavamox will lower his levels.   The vet is not sure what is causing his levels to be so high.  At first, we thought it was a fall my puppy took down some stairs back in Feb.    

The vet is recommending all these tests if Clavamox does not work. (including a liver biopsy)
The vet also said, the ultrasound would pin point what the probelm was.   The vet just beat around the bush after the ultrasound - and gave me another list of choices.  The ultrasound showed nothing abnormal about his liver.

Mind you, my puppy has had no change in behavior/eating habits.  He is the most active, playful, and very happy.

I'm rather stuck on what I should do.....  As most, my puppy is like my child I will do anything for him.....

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1436598_tn?1332900133
How much do you trust your vet?  You might want to get a second opinion if the clavamox does not solve the problem, before you go through a bunch of other tests. I'm not saying they might not be necessary but it just seems like your vet isn't really communicating too well with you.  Also, your pup is pretty young.

I'll keep my fingers crossed that the ALT comes down.  Maybe someone else on here has some other ideas.  Please keep us posted!
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462827_tn?1333172552
Hello & welcome.....Clavamox is a pretty safe Antibiotic.....Is your Vet using it for a Liver Infection? Usually, it's used for Upper things like teeth, ears, sinus, etc....

I'm glad you had the ultrasound....That rules out a Liver Shunt which I thought of to begin with.....Only cause your guy is so young, though. (Was my thinking)

So, did your Vet offer any medication for the Liver? That would have been the first line of defense while you sort out the problem....All Vets sell one....They go by different names because they are made by different companies, but all are the same ingredient....Your Vet dropped the ball on this one!

So, on to you & your puppy: You need to be looking for ANY toxins that are getting into this puppy's system....Flea/tick products, any medication, poisons on the yard or in the house, tap water (Full of chemicals), even down to the food he eats....Yes, there are many foods out there that are full of toxic chemicals that damge the Liver & Kidneys....

It's possible that he has an infection somewhere that needs to be better evaluated....Is he running a fever? There has to be something causing this.....

There are many OTC meds to help filter toxins from the Liver and they do work.... SAMe & Milk-thistle are the best.....However, your Vet should have recommended SOMETHING!

I agree with Deadgamegrrl, I think you need a Vet that will help you work through this and NOT just order more tests....

Give all of this some thought and come back with any more info. you may can think of....Karla


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462827_tn?1333172552
Something else....If your puppy came from a bad breeding facility, Pet Store, Back Yard Breeder, etc. or has had any ticks in the past....You need to have him checked for Tick Borne Diseases....Most of them can elevate the Liver enzymes.....Just a thought....
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Thank you so much Misftis4me for your response.  

After the Ultrasound, my vet ruled out anything major with my puppy's liver.  I am relieved to have had the ultrasound done.  

My vet suggested to do a bile test, where my dog would fast and they would run some sort of a test and then have him eat food and then do the test again - to see if his liver was functioning correctly.  The 2nd option was to put him on Clavamox (for infection) and the 3rd option was to put him on a steroid - pregastone. (for inflammation).   And, lastly my vet also recommended to do a liver biopsy.   To be completely honest, I don't feel that a liver biopsy is really appropriate at this time.  Plus, I don't have the money to do such a procedure.  It would be a totally different story if my puppy was showing signs of being extremely sick!  

My puppy has shown no signs of change in behavior or eating habits.  He is extremely playful and active.   No fever.

After reading your response, I am thinking maybe it is the water my puppy is drinking.  We have "well water" and we have a system that it goes thru to clean and filter the water.  Pretty much to make hard water - turn into soft water.  (hope I'm making sense)
I will try and give my puppy bottled water from now on.  

I did ask my vet about the heartworm medicine I give him the beginning of each month.  He ruled that out.

Thanks again for your imput - this site is really helping me!  I am really leaning towards getting a 2nd opinion.....

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462827_tn?1333172552
Let me look at his food...What are you feeding this guy? How bout any treats? Let me check them for Chemicals & toxins....Karla

P.S. Your Heartworm pill is designed to last 6 weeks (Not 4)! Your not suppose to know that!!! But, what your really doing is double dosing the last 2 weeks of each application...It's still a chemical & yes it is filtered through the Liver......
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462827_tn?1333172552
If your water filtering system is made to use SALT....Your dog should not be drinking it....
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Misfits4me THANK YOU SO MUCH!   You have no idea how much you are helping me with this probelm!   You are wonderful!!!!  

My puppy is eating science diet.  we tried that "holistic" food and it was too rich for his stomach.   as for treats, he has been eating Beggin strips & milk bones.   He also loves those rawhide chewies and bones.  

And, I do believe the water system that we use to filter and clean the water is made to use SALT!   Believe me, knowing that I will right away change the water he is drinking!

I asked the vet about the heartworm pill and he told me that the pill goes thru the  puppy's system in one day and would not affect the liver alt levels at all.......

Would you suggest changing the food we are giving him?!?



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462827_tn?1333172552
Which Science Diet? Exact name & name of the Holistic food that was too rich? I want to check that, too...


Purina Begging Strips
Ingredients:
Ground wheat, corn gluten meal, wheat flour, ground yellow corn, water, sugar, glycerin, soybean meal, meat, hydrogenated starch hydrolysate, bacon fat (preserved with BHA), salt, phosphoric acid, sorbic acid (a preservative), calcium propionate (a preservative), natural and artificial smoke flavors, added color (Red 40, Yellow 5, Blue 1, Yellow 6), choline chloride.

Dogs should have NO Corn, Wheat or Soy...All are suspected to cause allergies in Canines...See the bacon Fat? That's really not the problem, but the chemical that it's preserved with IS! BHA has been banned for Human consumption because of it's link to Cancer!! You don't want to see this in any food your pet eats.....

See the meat? What kind of meat? You want to see a specific meat name in food....This could be roadkill!! For that matter, I'm sorry to say that it probably is!

There's NO need for sugar in any dogfood....It's like doggie crack and that's why they like these treats....

All those dyes are unneccesary...The Red has been blamed for cancerous properties & is suppose to be banned for humans....But, they think dogs can? That's ridiculous!!!  Dogs do not care what color their treats are......That's for humans!!!! NO dyes should be in anything a dog eats!!!  IMO, these are toxic treats....Sorry

Please remember, I'm trying to help your dog...  ;)   Karla
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462827_tn?1333172552
From "Dogfood Advisor.Com" ~~~~


Hill’s Science Diet Puppy dry dog food earns the Advisor’s second-lowest rating of two stars.

Currently, the Hill’s Science Diet Puppy product line lists five dry dog foods.

Although each formulation appears to be designed for puppies, we found no AAFCO nutritional adequacy statements for these dog foods on the Hill’s Science Diet website.

■Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Lamb Mal and Rice Large Breed
■Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Healthy Development Original
■Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Lamb Meal and Rice
■Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Large Breed
■Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Small Bites
Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Small Bites dry dog food was selected to represent the others in the line for this review.


Hill's Science Diet Puppy Small Bites
Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content

  

Ingredients: Ground whole grain corn, chicken by-product meal, animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), liver flavor, flaxseed, soybean oil, powdered cellulose, dried beet pulp, fish oil, corn gluten meal, dicalcium phosphate, dried egg product, iodized salt, dl-methionine, potassium chloride, choline chloride, natural flavor, vitamins (l-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), vitamin E supplement, niacin, thiamine mononitrate, vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement), vitamin E supplement, minerals (manganese sulfate, ferrous sulfate, zinc oxide, copper sulfate, calcium iodate, sodium selenite), l-tryptophan, preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid, l-carnitine, phosphoric acid, beta-carotene, rosemary extract

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 3.6%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients

The first ingredient in this dog food is corn. Now, contrary to what you may have heard, corn isn’t necessarily a bad ingredient.

On the other hand, although there’s no way to know for sure here, the corn used in making many pet foods can be similar to the kind used to make feed for livestock.

And that can sometimes be problematic.

What’s more, corn is commonly linked to canine food allergies1.

For these reasons, we rarely consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The second item lists chicken by-product meal… a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of a slaughtered chicken after all the prime cuts have been removed.

In a nutshell, chicken by-products are those unsavory leftovers usually considered “unfit for human consumption”.

This stuff can contain almost anything… feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs… you name it.

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

The third item lists animal fat. Animal fat is a generic by-product of rendering… the same high-temperature process used to make meat meals.

Since there’s no mention of a specific animal, this item could come from almost anywhere… restaurant grease, slaughterhouse waste, diseased cattle… even euthanized pets.

We do not consider generic animal fat a quality ingredient.

After liver flavor, we find flaxseed… one of the best plant sources of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Flax seeds are rich in soluble fiber.

However, we find it unusual to see flaxseed here in its whole seed form. Whole flax seeds are almost impossible to digest (at least for us humans) unless they are first ground to a usable powder before they are consumed.

The sixth ingredient is soybean oil… red flagged here only due to its suspected (yet unlikely) link to canine food allergies.

The seventh ingredient is powdered cellulose… a non-digestible plant fiber usually made from cotton or sawdust.

Cellulose is sometimes added to dilute the number of calories per serving and to give the feeling of fullness when it is eaten.

Except for the usual benefits of fiber, powdered cellulose provides no nutritional value to a dog.

The eighth item lists dried beet pulp. Beet pulp is a controversial ingredient… a high fiber by-product of sugar beet processing.

Some denounce beet pulp as an inexpensive filler while others cite its outstanding intestinal health and blood sugar benefits.

We only call your attention here to the controversy and believe the inclusion of beet pulp in reasonable amounts in most dog foods is entirely acceptable.

The ninth ingredient is fish oil. Fish oil is naturally rich in omega-3 fatty acids… and (depending on the level of its purity) should be considered a healthy addition.

The tenth item is corn gluten meal. Gluten is the rubbery residue remaining once corn has had most of its starchy carbohydrate (the good stuff) washed out of it.

Compared to meat, glutens are inferior grain-based proteins low in many of the essential amino acids dogs need to sustain life.

This inexpensive plant-based ingredient can significantly boost the total protein content reported in this dog food.

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to have much of an effect on the overall rating of this product.

With two notable exceptions…

First, we find no evidence of probiotics… friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing.

Finally, the minerals here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

Hill’s Science Diet Puppy Dry Dog Food
The Bottom Line

Judging by its ingredients alone, Hill’s Science Diet Puppy appears to be a below-average dry dog food.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 32%, a fat level of 23% and an estimated carbohydrate content of 37%.

As a group, the puppy line features an average protein content of 32% and an average fat level of 20%. Jointly, these figures suggest a carbohydrate serving size of 40% for the overall product line.

Above-average protein. Above-average fat. And low carbs… when compared to a typical dry dog food.

Yet when you allow for the protein-boosting effect of the corn gluten meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing only a moderate amount of meat.

What’s more, it’s difficult to ignore the presence of so many Red Flag ingredients.

Bottom line?

Hill’s Science Diet Puppy is a grain-based dry dog food using a moderate amount of chicken by-product or lamb meals as its main sources of animal protein… thus earning the brand two stars.

Not recommended.

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My 5 year old dog recently had a blood test showed liver enzymes were elevated Alt 400+, my vet put him on metronidazole and amoxicillin for 30 days. His second blood test came back after 30 days were worse. The liver enzymes went sky high, Alt 2250, AST 294. My vet now wanted to put him on baytril & clavamox, as well as Actigall.
I found out metronidazole could damage his liver more. What should I do? Please help.
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Hi there,
I appreciate the info to educate others on the bottom line driven inadequacies and potential dangers of commercial dog food.  
EVERY animal owner needs to know this.  

But I did not see mention of the BHA.
This preservative is not only in MOST commercial pet food but almost ALL pet TREATS, including the two SMPAL mentioned::::
BHA and others like it are known carcinogenics used not only in pet foods but human food and beauty products as well.
Its argued that it is used in such small amounts that it does not have negative affects but if an animal (or human) eats and/or uses the same food, treats and products daily, this carcinogen accumulates in their systems.  Cancer rates among pets have increased proportionaly to this being introduced into the market.

There are foods, treats and products that do NOT use BHA or BHT.
CHECK THE INGREDIENTS ON EVERYTHING YOU AND YOUR FAMILY USES.
Good luck
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi there,
I appreciate the info to educate others on the bottom line driven inadequacies and potential dangers of commercial dog food.  
EVERY animal owner needs to know this.  

But I did not see mention of the BHA.
This preservative is not only in MOST commercial pet food but almost ALL pet TREATS, including the two SMPAL mentioned::::
BHA and others like it are known carcinogenics used not only in pet foods but human food and beauty products as well.
Its argued that it is used in such small amounts that it does not have negative affects but if an animal (or human) eats and/or uses the same food, treats and products daily, this carcinogen accumulates in their systems.  Cancer rates among pets have increased proportionaly to this being introduced into the market.

There are foods, treats and products that do NOT use BHA or BHT.
CHECK THE INGREDIENTS ON EVERYTHING YOU AND YOUR FAMILY USES.
Good luck
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Avatar_f_tn
My precious baby has the same symptoms, basically with little hope!
I have been advised that this condition is CAUSED BY FOOD ALLERGIES.  The more I think about how his skin, hair and mobility has changed I am convinced (and SO sorry that I didn't realize the source of his problems before he finally couldn't walk and was an ER patient) !  But I am thankful that friend recommended a Vet that understands food allergies.!  Her love is still alive after a year of his advice.
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