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Grain Free dog for for dog prone to bladder stones
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Grain Free dog for for dog prone to bladder stones

I need some suggestions on a grain free dog food.
I have a Shih Tzu who is going in for surgery soon to have two large bladder stones removed.
He also has two small ones in his kidney.
The vet keeps talking about getting him started on Hill's diet. I have no intention of buying this food from them. I have reminded her three times that he needs to be on a grain free food. I will not risk the chance of switching foods & having him go through the miserable itchiness, hair loss & yeast infection again. But if there is a no grain food that can lower the risk of these stones occurring again I want to try it.
It took months of gradual food changes to find the right food for him. It is high protein & he did gain weight but better than the alternative.
Does any one know of a grain free dog food that may work for this issues as well?
Thanks!
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462827_tn?1333172552
Hi there...There's a link posted earlier that may help you get started....It's on the second page of this forum & it's titled: "Not a Question, Info. on Renal Disease". Posted on April 12th....It speaks about food for dogs with renal problems...

I agree w/you.....I wouldn't do the Prescription Diets either.......Check out this post and see what you think...Come back and let me know.....Surely, we can find you a grain free food.....What is he eating now? Do you know which kind of stones your dealing with? That is important when it comes to the diet.... Karla
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1660289_tn?1302560398
Great thanks I did read that. I printed out some info, some brands & have talked to the owner of the place I buy my dog food. (I have two dogs on California Naturals)
He has been happily eating Instinct grain free chicken dry food http://www.naturesvariety.com/instinct
but has gained weight. Big time!

Several years ago when making the switch to no grain for him we did try Evo, Innova & one other I can't recall.

The vet is quite sure the stones are oxalate, we will know after surgery.
Urinalysis & culture showed no infection, no crystals & no blood in urine .Doesn't seem to strain when urinating.

Thanks again!
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462827_tn?1333172552
Dog Food (Canine Diet and Nutrition)/Diet for bladder stones

Expert: Gail Vigneault - 6/23/2008 (Canine Nutritionist)

Question
My 12 year old dog had surgery to remove bladder stones a week ago. We don't have a definite diagnosis on the composition yet, but the vet believes they are the calcium oxalate type. Until we know for sure, she wants to put her on a RX diet - Royal Canin S/O, which offers support for all types of stones by controlling the minerals in the food.

Most RX diets, including this one uses a lot of by-products and low quality ingredients, so I am hesitant to use it. I am feeding her Innova Senior canned now and California Naturals Chicken/Rice, which is a much higher quality. She also gets only distilled water, and I give her carrots for treats.  

I don't have the time or the patience to make home cooked meals every day, so that is not an option really. My question is what is the best "over the counter" canned food to support a dog who is prone to get bladder stones? Let's just assume they are the calcium oxalate type until I know for sure. THANKS!


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Answer
Good morning, Fawn.

I'm sorry your 12 year old had to have surgery for bladder stones.

I don't blame you for not wanting to use the prescription diets.  The prescription diets for stones are created to alter the PH of the urine to make the urine less conducive to the formation of stones that have been found, however, as you said, they are typically not of the highest quality.  At the same time, we've seen cases where giving the prescription diet turned the urine in the opposite direction to the degree that crystals developed.  In my opinion and experience, it is healthier for a dog to try for the results via a more natural diet.

You DO have a good start by feeding canned rather than dry food.

Studies have been published regarding the formation of oxalate stones and how diet does effect them.  From one PubMed posted study:  Results suggest that dry diets formulated to contain high concentrations of protein, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride may minimize formation of CaOx uroliths. In addition, comparison of risk and protective factors of various diet ingredients fed to dogs with CaOx uroliths suggests that although similar findings were observed in canned and dry formulations, in general, greater risk is associated with dry formulations.

And from another:  Canned foods with the highest amount of protein, fat, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, or moisture were associated with a decreased risk of CaOx urolith formation, compared with diets with the lowest amounts. In contrast, canned diets with the highest amount of carbohydrate were associated with an increased risk of CaOx urolith formation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Feeding canned diets formulated to contain high amounts of protein, fat, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and moisture and a low amount of carbohydrate may minimize the risk of CaOx urolith formation in dogs.

Based upon this and the results we have seen, as well as considering a dog's most appropriate and natural diet, I would look more at canned foods such as Evo where there is a high meat protein content and a low carbohydrate content.  While the Innova Senior and the California Natural are both nice foods, they still contain a higher amount of carbohydrates than is conducive for your dog's condition.  

Grains and other carbohydrate sources, even more so in dry foods, can play a significant role in the formation of stones and crystals, both struvite and oxalate so it is best to avoid them as much as possible.

Please keep me updated.

Gail
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My wife and I just dissolved our 2+ year old female cockachon struvite bladder stones in just 10 weeks. Here is some information on what we did:

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Faskville.amazon.com%2Fshare-info-dog's-10-week-successful-struvite-bladder-stone-dissolution%2FAnswerViewer.do%3FrequestId%3D87918848&h=wAQH_kGuK
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