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Juvenile Renal Disease in my lab pup
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Juvenile Renal Disease in my lab pup

The last couple days with my 10 week old labrador retriever puppy have not been good.  When we first got her at 6 weeks she was extremely thirsty all the time. That has slowed down until now. Since yesterday she was been drinking so much water and now right after she is peeing almost uncontrollably.. not even squatting some of the times and also sometimes when I dont let her have too much water she tries to pee but only piddles a little bit. Well anyway yesterday I decided to take her to a vet because I was thinking she might have a bladder infection or something because she has a little bit of yellowish greenish puss on her vagina. I have never been to this vet before but I brought in a urine sample and we went into the room for an examination. The vet (I had a very hard time understanding him with his thick Indian accent) asked right away about if she was drinking exessice water and then started in on that maybe she had a vaginal infection but we should do blood work because it could be early signs of Juvenile Kidney Disease. Well that freaked me out so we said yes and they took her blood and urine and also gave her an antibiotic shot along with a 10 day pill pack of antibiotics. Well today I talked to the vet on the phone and he didnt say anything about a UTI. He said she was anemic and different things in her blood were high and different things were low.. I plan on getting a copy of the paper for a second opinion.. but said I need to bring in a stool sample to have it checked for parasites which may be causing her to be anemic. So Im still waiting to here back about the stool sample but have been sick to my stomache all day and crying just thinking about my little sweetheart having kidney disease. The one thing I though was odd was that her BUN and creatine levels in her blood were normal and yet the vet still thinks its a possibility. My family thinks the vet may have jumped the gun on saying it could be kidney disease.. I just dont see how we can afford this. I have been so sad all day thinking of this and dont even know what tp expect.. like how long will my puppy live with kidney disease and how much is it going to cost to prolong her life.. Is this even common in a labrador puppy so young of age? Its super depressing and theres not much information on what happens to puppies with juvenile renal disease. The vet told me not to go home and read on the diseases he was talking about but how could I not? I dont know how I feel about this vet but I am hoping tomorrow for news on whether or not she has parasites. Anyone else experience this with there puppy?
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675347_tn?1365464245
Don't give up on your vet. He may well be on the right track.
If her BUN and Creatinine are not very elevated at this stage, and excessive drinking and urinating the main symptoms, then it sounds as if you may have caught this at an early stage, when something can be done to manage it.
Low protein, low phosphorus diet, coupled with any medication the vet suggests, and possibly fluids injected subcutaneously....will all help to give her a better life.

Treatments for the symptoms of JRD include a low protein and low phosphorus prescription diet, such as Hill's K/D or Royal Canin Renal... The predominant effect of the low protein diet is to minimize production of uremic toxins so that the patient feels better.  High phosphorus accelerates renal failure, and restricted phosphorus slows it down. K/D is low in phosphorus, so it's a good food for dogs in this condition. Or it is possible -with some good research- to home-cook a Renal diet. In addition to diet, IV fluids can be administered to correct disturbances created by the retention of uremic toxins. Epogen can be prescribed to treat the anemia of chronic renal failure.

Although I have no experience in Juvenile Kidney disease, I do have a dog who was diagnosed with early-stage kidney failure last October. We started her treatment and diet right away, and now her BUN and Creatinine levels -which were elevated -have come right down to normal. So tha does go to show that the earlier  this disease is caught and treated, the better hope there is.
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441382_tn?1329196690
The symptoms that you listed ARE textbook for Juvenile Kidney Disease, however they can also signal a urinary tract infection.  The fact that you say she has a greenish discharge says that she may have puppy vaginitis, which can lead to a urinary tract infection.  

The fact that her kidney values are within normal range right now doesn't mean that she doesn't have juvenile kidney disease, however.  The heartbreaking part of this disease is that it often follows that along with the kidney disease, the dog also has what are referred to as juvenile kidneys, meaning that as the dog grows, its kidneys do not.  The reason dogs afflicted with this disease most often die by the age of 18 - 24 months is because (in the case of a labrador) a dog that weighs 65-70 pounds by the age of 18 -24 months cannot maintain the filtering needs on a body of that size with the kidneys of a dog that weighs 10-15 pounds.  As the dog grows and the kidneys do not, it becomes apparent that the kidneys are not able to do their job because the dog exhibits all of the symptoms of an animal in renal failure.  

Did your vet palpate the kidneys when you took the puppy in for his examination?  Juvenile kidneys are small and often misshapen, so the vet can often suspect a case of juvenile kidneys long before the dog begins to show signs of illness.  As the dog grows, instead of the gums being a healthy, bright pink color they become a muddy pinkish/brown color, a dead giveaway for juvenile kidneys.

Rationally speaking, in smaller breeds it is easier to maintain a grown dog with juvenile kidneys to extend their lives for a while because the body of the dog is oftentimes not much larger than it was when it was a 3-4 month old puppy.  However, in large breeds, by the time the dog is 6-9 months old it is already showing all the signs of kidney failure and only the very diligent are able to extend their lives after that point.

I had a collie with juvenile kidneys that I adopted from a breeder friend of mine.  Obviously she couldn't sell the puppy but he was so sweet and loving that we wanted to give him a chance to be around for as long as he could, so he came to live with me where I gave him sub-Q fluids every day and put him on a home-cooking renal failure diet.  I was able to maintain him until he was almost three years old, at which point he was having more days when he was feeling nauseous and bad than good days so my friend and I made the dreaded decision together to let him go.

If you bought this puppy from a breeder you need to contact her or him now and tell them about this.  IF this puppy has juvenile kidney disease and/or juvenile kidneys, the breeder should take him back and either refund your money or replace him with a healthy puppy since a puppy with these problems is not considered fit for sale.  If you bought the puppy from a pet store, the store should do the same - either refund your money or replace the puppy.  If you receive any trouble from the entity that sold you the puppy, you do have legal recourse in a small claims court to recoup your money or get a replacement puppy.  This is, indeed, a very sad situation but one that you did not sign on for when you purchased the puppy.  This would definitely fall under the heading of a catastrophic illness so legally speaking, you have a lot to back you up.

Please let us know how things turn out.  I am hoping beyond hope that this turns out to be a urinary tract infection that can be dealt with by a course of antibiotics.

Ghilly
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