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High heart rate during exercise
I am a new paramedic, and I recently took the physical fitness test at the hospital.  I was told that as a 33 year old female, my maximum heart rate should be around 158 during activity.  It was 198 at one point.  Unfortunately my active heart rate has always been high, and until this test, it has never been a problem.  I was told I need to figure out how to correct this.  Any ideas? Certain exercises, or medications?
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Hello!

When you have increased heart rate, the heart pumps faster, When the heart beats rapidly, the heart pumps less efficiently and provides less blood flow to the rest of the body, including the heart itself. The increased heart rate also leads to increased work and oxygen demand for the heart and if your resting heart rate is fine I would suggest you a physical examination near a cardiologist to rule out any tachycardia due to ventricular or other cardiac problems.

The commonest reasons are sympathetic stimulation and also hormonal as adrenalin hormone is secreted during flight, fright and fight and your heart rate increases. It is always good to rule out any pathology. If your heart is healthy then it is fine.

Take care!
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Hey guys and gals, with a high heart rate. I have a question, how often you drink coffee or other drinks with caffeine in them? If anyone of you drinkg either coffee or any other coffeine containing drink (power drink, sodas etc) on a daily basis I suggest to stop for a week or even better two, and measure your heart rate after that.
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Hello Have they figured out what is wrong.  I have the exact same problem.  Every test know to man has been run.  They found nothing.  I get on the tredmill for 2 minutes and my heart rate goes to 170. I am 50 years old.  I am over weight.  But this only started about 6 months ago.  Something change.  I have been around the same weight for years.  If you have any more info or if any one does, please post it.
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Has anybody here with the high heart rate during exercise been diagnosed with Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia? I recently was, cause unknown. Now i was also diagnosed with a mild mitrovalve prolapse, but not known if it is related.  Same thing, high heart rate when exercising.  After doing research online I found this (IST) happening mostly in women in their late teens and in their mid 30's (i'm 36), and for unknown reason more with women in the healthcare field (me).

I also found forums where women found these symptoms after taking hormones. Anybody here see a relation with that? I do, possibly. Next to my heart rate jumping up when running, my main other symprom is extreme fatigue when not exercising, but can function ok. Am still trying to figure all this out, but i know a change in much higher heart rate when exercising can definetely have underlying causes, so don't just disregard it. If you have always had it, it might be a different story.
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Hello,

I came across this message board just now and think it is great.

Here is my situation:
I am 29 years old, 5’11" and about 175 lbs. My resting heart rate is probably in the low 70’s. I started running/jogging back in October and currently I run 3-4 times a week, 3.5-4.0 miles each time. My mile time ranges from 10:00-10:15 per mile. When I run/jog, my heart rate gets above 190 bpm for the majority of the run. My last run (yesterday), my HRM said my average heart rate was 191 bpm and my peak bpm was 204. I do not experience any chest pain, sweat normally (in my opinion), and only breathe a little harder than normal. Nothing I wouldn’t expect while exercising.  My blood pressure has been a little above normal for the longest time and I finally asked my doctor about it the last time I went due to the fact hypertension runs rampant in my family (both sides). I was referred to a cardiologist and took a standard treadmill stress test. The cardiologist said my heart beat/rhythm/pattern (whatever the proper term is) was normal, but my blood pressure was higher than she liked while exercising (I think the last reading was 160/102 after 12:00 minutes of briskly walking at a small incline).

Besides the elevated blood pressure (I am awaiting a follow up visit with my doctor), is having a heart rate in the 190’s during exercise harmful? From reading all of the posts, it seems okay. Each person is different. I do drink a cup of coffee in the morning and soda with caffeine. I might try cutting out all of the caffeine for 1-2 weeks and see if my heart rate drops any while exercising.
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Hello,

Just finished echo stress test and was told that things look fine but only went 8 min. before hr hit 190.  HR returned to normal quickly enough.  Have a history of not being able to keep hr down. Hospitalized a few times for AF, but not in last 10 years.  Not on meds now.

Bio: I'm 62, slender, eat well, a bit of a worrier, but seem to feel best when adrenaline is flowing.  Very difficult to get up in the morning...30 minutes like a zombie before I start to feel anywhere near good.  Afternoons after lunch are much better.  I wonder if the lack of adrenaline while sleeping affects how I feel.  

Cardiologist said I could use beta blockers if I wanted to but I'm a bit reluctant since I would rather try exercise and some of the other suggestions in this thread.  My main form of exercise the last couple of years has been 30 minute brisk walks (3 -4 times/wk) which get hr to 140.

My question is since I am 5'10" and weigh 150 on a good day, could my muscle mass (or lack of) be causing my heart to beat faster during exercise?    If so how can I safely increase it.  My genes are reluctant to allow me to gain weight.

Thanks for any suggestions.
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1278853 tn?1271172114
I've exercised JUST about everyday OVER a yr. now.  My hear rate is high as well.  I slow down when it goes to 175 or above... BUT why does it jump to 175. then 189 then 160 and back and forth... no steady read,.  I've switched machines thinking the monitor was broken.  It is still the same.
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I have been experiencing out of body experiences while excercising.  I don't even get 15min into my routine when my heart rate shoots up to above 150 and I get dizzy, light headed sweaty and alittle disorgientared. It's scary! I went to the cardio doctor and had EKG, stress test with dye, ultrasound of the heart, heart monitor and all were normal. They did say that I had a low resting HR. These episodes really interrupt my workouts. I have to leave in the middle of classes etc. It's really scary.  Now I'm a 47 yr old woman, full hyterectomy, on the vivelle patch .05 which is the lowest dose.  Can these episodes be hormone related? This never happened before...only the last year or so. I used to be known as the "spin queen" and would do a spin class 3/4 days a week now I can't even do it anymore.  Any advice?? Help!!
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Hello ALL,  This is a great forum...  So much good info.. Well I like to share my info:
I am a 36 yo male..  Very athletic in my Highschool / college years(played football and wrestled).. At the age of 32yo i was diagnoised with GAD/Panic disorder, but not bad enough for meds.. I also had 3 bouts of cardio induces HYPERVENTALATING.. I went to the ER right after(drove myself) and each time the ER Said it was stress/anexity..

Anyhow I just got back into Cardio after not doing any for 8 months.. I was amazed on how fast my HEART RATE has adjusted to the exercise...
1) First month i did bike and my HR would goto 130 within a few minutes(easiliy)- so i had to peddle easy for 20mins (like 50-60rpms)

2) 2nd month my HR (i really saw the difference in 2-3 weeks) I had to work hard to get my HEART RATE up to 140BPM.. I would have to peddle in the 80-90rpms.. Of coarse if i changed resistance to uppder end like level 8(10 level) I could easily raise my HR..

My problem: I do cardio 5-6 times aweek and  normaly 1 of these days I have a BAD CARDIO day were my HR SPIKES.. I think it may be anexity, but I dont have the normal shortness of breath.. MY heart rate will goto 130-150 easily and wont drop fast when i slow down.. NORMALLY if I get my HR to 150 and slow down my RPM's to 50 my heart would dropped 35+BPM in less than a minute...

I had a regular stress test, blood test,  ekgs, and etc.. My cardio said STOP CHECKING YOUR PULSE..

Any ideas?? I am gonna try weight training to see of this helps.. I just have cevical nek issues so i got to take it slow..   thanks for aeveryones help
don
dax 0007 at hot mail *******
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I am a 26 yr old female - very active and have been my whole life.....I don't drink alochol at all, don't smoke, work out 5 days a week, however do suffer from daily anxiety. The last few months I notice that in my Zumba class my Heart Rate goes so high that I Feel like my heart may fly out of my chest....I also feel dizzy too.......Not sure if this is the anxiety or if something is wrong with my heart. My mother is overweight and has various heart issues/heart disease.......so it could be inherited from her.....but agian, not sure if its the anxiety talking......I do know that my heart beats SO Hard even walking up 3 flights of stairs and I'm very lean, muscular and healthy..............I wonder if I should have a stress test taken? I now panic that I will have a heart attack while doing cardio......it freaks me out!
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I am 25 years old, I work out 5 days a week, my heart rate is always between 165 and 190 when I work out. I have HYPOTHYROID which I am medicated for however my doctor claims this has a direct impact on my heart rate. If you are noticing you have a low resting rate and all the sudden you skyrocket to 170+ without even breaking a sweat, get tested! its a simple blood test and if you do have it, fixing it makes all the difference in the world, lose weight faster, more energy, no more dry skin, better moods.. just thought i'd throw that out there.
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I have worked out all my life.  I have been practicing yoga for over 5 years regualrly.  generally I can keep my heartrate below 160, but this is high for my age.  Howeve, I experience no symptoms, pain, or even heavy breathing.  At times it weirdly shoots up to (today) 198) but I felt no different I figure it is really a glitch in the maching.  I have worked out deliberatly intense to get my heartrate to the max - at even at 40 my max is over 200 (so the charts lie).  I have had mine up to 210 over age 40 and experienced no pain or negative symptoms.  I usually have a resting pulse of 65, but I recall once or twice in my 20's it being over 113 - merely due to the symptomatic nervous system - which is why I use yoga and deep breathing.  Normally, I am within my target range within 5 minutes.  Somtimes I am in fat-burning range after two steps...My question is am I really burning more fat?  If I do 30 min at 159 bpm it seem I should burn more than 210 calories, especially when I can do the same on the baike at a lower heart rate.  The scales are bogus in my opinion.

   I do worry at time (especially when I see the numbers suddenly jump to 178 and then drop to 140).  This is usually rare, though and I usually attribute it to mechanical error.  I always feel fine.  Should I be concerened?
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(over 200 plus since high school track, as well as 20+ years later)

I am a 42 YO male doc with no health issues other than cholesterolemia, which is surely familial and stupid high. I am 5'11'' and 220 lbs and about 18% body fat. I ran cross country in high school as well as track. Back then I weighed 140 lbs. My resting heart rate has never historically been below 55 no matter how well trained. My high school exercise sprint rates would go Well Over 200 (so fast- barely count) with no perceived chest pain. I would grow winded but these were with sub 1 min quarter miles, sub 2 min half miles, 4:30 mile, and 5 and 10K times of sub 17 and sub 38. Despite being lean and fit my heart rate was always the highest of anyone I trained with. My cholesterol was around 220 and HDL only about 35 with triglicerides over 600, at 16 years of age and 140 lbs. My numbers are all worse now since I am fat and slow. I ran a 1:50 quarter this morning, which is very fast for me now (8.5 of  10 exertion), and my heart rate was over 225. Thats about 125% the traditional 220-age max rate via the traditionally quoted formula .NO pain. Tired and a little sore. (pretty out of shape) I am worried that my 40 years of cholesterol are going to get me. I had an exercise physiologist at the gym, he does the review for the cardiologists, run me on the treadmill and he saw some minor arrythmia towards 190 beats and shut it down. I was just starting to work hard at perhaps a level of 6 or 7 of 10 perceived level maybe 10 min or so into it?? He was surprised how high my rate went, but said it all looked good as it was monitored. I also had a normal resting EKG pre op for a shoulder surgery. I hope this helps. Obviously I am concerned, otherwise I wouldn't be here googling this in the first place. (I have never responded to one of these-ever) A local cardiologist has agreed to treat my cholesterol, I will ask him what he thinks when able. No answers, only some FYI from my particular history. Everyone, seems to think I am going to have a cardiac event, frankly, I wonder myself. The replies here have provided some level of assurance. I am mostly fearful of pushing to hard. The last time I did the "old guy routine' with a personal trainer and tried to bench 300 (did it, easy till it ripped out my humerous- only 6 weeks of weights), I "burst" my pec major and had to have it repaired (rare complete avulsion with bone anchor).  Now I can barely do a push up 2 years later since most of the muscle is still avulsed and flapping around on my chest. I am a little fearful of the corrsponding "old guy cardiac burst', until then I am gunna push, but not 'max out'.
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Complicated question, but i'll try to answer in plain english:

q. will I die if my heart rate goes to high?
a. unlikely, as the heart rate goes up it will get to a point where its efficiency as a pump will drop dramatically, and following this would be a dramatic drop in blood pressure, this would usually lead to a loss of conciousness but in those with cardio-vascular disease could lead to heart attack. The real danger is taking you blood pressure too high which can lead to stroke so look out for headaches.

q. will training at a high heart rate do me damage?
a. unlikely, but it trains your heart to pump faster not harder. the real advantage to exercise for health is training your heart to pump harder. Really fit people have much lower resting heart rates because their heart pumps more blood on each beat and their body uses the blood more efficiently. Couple this with the ability to take their heart rate up a little higher than the rest of us and you will see that the amount of blood they can supply to their muscles is vastly increased.

q. how can I lower my heart rate while running at the same intensity?
a. make your muscles stronger, do weights, it makes them more efficient and lowers their demand for blood to be supplied. Also if you are new to exercise your muscles wont be as strong or as efficient so your heart rate will need to be higher, as you get used to it and stronger
your heart rate will drop a little.

q. what can effect my heart rate on different days?
a. usually stimulants (coffee, nicotine), dehydration, low blood sugar (running in the morning before breakfast will give a higher bpm than before dinner). altitude (less oxygen available), having not left enough time after eating (blood is absorbing nutrients from the intestines and so is not available to the muscles) and mood.

we are all different, if you watch 2 cyclists go up a hill at the same speed you may find that one pedals faster and in a lower gear than the other, same goes for our hearts. Then you see a top class racer, pedalling both faster and harder, overtake them both.

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35 Year Old Male
160 lbs
Run 3 / 4 times a week: 6-7 miles each time
Slow run = above 9 mins/mile
Fast run = below 8:30 mins/mile
Slow Run = 150 - 165bpm
Fast Run = 180 - 200bpm
Heart rate range sustained for entire workout (usually about an hour)
Resting Heart Rate:  a little unclear but generally between 70 - 90 bpm
Time to reach max heart rate: Within 1st Mile
Measured heart rate has always been historically high, although i have only been active for the last 18 months
Ran Marathon and Climbed Kilimanjaro this year
Want to run tests, but afraid of being tagged with pre-existing condition if something is found.  Thoughts?
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When I do Cardio on the stationary bike my heart rate jumps to 213 at least once during the workout.  My doctor told me to kind of grunt if you will which immediately makes my heart rate drop back down into a normal range again.  My resting heart rate is usually around 63 bpm so figure I just work out really hard.  He says there isn't really any harm as long as it comes right back down again and to monitor it closely when I am working out.
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I am a 40 year old male with having an ASD closed by device in October, 2009. After that I used to walk around 1 hr daily morning in the empty stomach. It was going great until I had stomach problem in last July. When I resumed my morning walk all of a sudden i realized that i feel a bit nausea with extreme weakness. Went back to my doctor and she suggested that device is well fit and working there without any issue. I consulted another doc and as per him my heart rate is going down and if it farther deteriorates it might call for a pacemaker implantation. This got puzzled me a bit and stopped doing all sorts of work out. After a break I tried the morning walk again and experiencing the same effect. Is this the impact of my device placement? How to go about now.... I found my pulse is about 66/70 bpm after around 30 mins of walk. Is it alright? Can someone put some light on it?

Thanks - Shofiq
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Love this thread.
Conclusions I've come to:
1.  I had heard that the max 220 was never intended as a standard for all people and now I believe it. (I too have a high heart beat.)
2.  If you are a regular excerciser and the heart rate stays high don't worry about it unless there is signifigant pain.
3.  Everybody has different body reactions.  As long as you train for a significant time, don't worry if your heart rate is above the recommended amount.
Comedian Eddie Izzard ran 43 marathons in 51 days after training for 7 weeks.  He was 47 and had no prior history of distance running.  My guess is if he paid attention to the heart rate formulas he would have never done it. (check it out on wikipedia)
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Hi, I read about your low blood pressure and your high heart rate. I have the same problem and my dr said I have Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrom and Orthostatic Hypotension. He is going to put me on meds for it. You may want to ask your dr about a tilt table test. also you may want to have your blood tested to check for anemia. vegetarians are more prone to developing it. that could also contribute to the low blood pressure. just a few ideas for you. hope it helps!

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Folks,
I have done weight workouts and exercise bike-then-Road bike for 25 years 5 days per week or more. Road bike pretty fast with heart rate monitor. I am 71 Y.O. , 135#, 5'8". Smoked in youth, gave up moderate drinking. Resting BPM is 65-72.
3.5 years ago had aortic valve replaced along with Dacron aorta and 2.5 years ago became vegan with fat intake below 20 grams per day.
Past 2 years I get sudden spikes in heart rate when riding --- up to  160 to 212 or so. First this was occasionally and I thought it was electrical interference and bought new monitor. Now I ride and my BPM stays about 110-115 and then may inch  up to 120 and then suddenly spikes to 162 and maybe 212 usually after grooving at maybe 15MPH or climbing a grade. I ease off and it drops pretty fast. This happens every ride now and I do not feel like I am working very hard though I feel slightly shaky afterwards (maybe nerves). I find it hard to hit my target 130 and stay there on my bike.
On rainy days I may go to the the gym and do tread mill at 3.8 MPH at 15% incline and never get spike and hold pretty well at 128-135 or so.
  My cardiologist (marathon runner) just blows me off, says my echo shows strong heart and pig valve working fine. Says BPM spike is electronic interference.
I do not drink much H2O so am increasing my water intake. One cup 50% decaf coffee. I am retire technical director (chemistry) and know how to analyze data so i'll figure this out if I don't die first.
Jim B.
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Lots of great info here!  I am 38 and have been running for about 2 months on the treadmill.  I do interval training so I walk at 4.0 for a lap, then jog for a mile a 6.0, then walk for a lap, jog for 2 laps, walk a lap and jog for 1 lap.
So about 2.5 miles total, but only jogging for 1.5 miles. When I jog, my HR goes up to about 175 and I don't feel 6.0 is all that fast.  I am at 1.5% incline so it is more like outside.   When I walk it goes down about about 137-144 which is still above target for my age.  Sometimes I try to sprint at 9-10 mph for 30 seconds and my HR goes up to about 185.  Like many of you, I feel like I need to slow down and be careful.  I wanted to try to do a 5k, but can't get to the point of going past a mile straight on the treadmill.  I have had a stress/echo which stated there was some "tachacardia" but not to be concerned about that? I also get some palpitations at times, but the they were diagnoses as PCV or (early heart beats lower in the heart?).  When I was in high school I played football and was a running back. During my Jr. and Sr. years , I started to become very dizzy, neaseous, and weak after on full out run. I was pretty much usless after that and was probably playing at 50% of capacity.  Very tough 2 years. My Freshman and Sophomore years, I had none of these symptoms.  I had a stress test (back in the early 90's) that showed nothing and they tried to say it was asthma, which it was not. No trouble breathing at all.  I wonder if this is all related?  Any comments/ help/ advice would be greatly appreciated!  
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Just want to say that after reading several of these posts,  I don't see any mention of what people are eating.  I am not a Doctor.  But, I have made changes to what I eat and feel a huge change in my regular exercise.  It is so easy to not eat well.  Try lowering sodium intake.  Just about everyone gets way more than enough.  Get natural carbs and protein.  Lower the fat and cholesterol.  Do not get rid of it but adjust for you.  YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT.
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I am a 28 year old female and pretty healthy.  I have also been having heart problems during which my heart will start racing and I get short of breath and chest pains.  I've had EKG ECG Holter, etc and all tests came back normal.  Lately when I do cardio (maybe 20-30 mins on a x-trainer), my heartrate will be steady at around 135-140 for the first 10 mins, then will drop to 109 in a matter of a minute or two (while still maintaining the same exercise pace) and then it spikes to well over 180 (still at the same pace).  This all happens in a matter of minutes.  My doctor is looking into other possibilities but just wondering if anyone else experiences this or knows what it is??
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I am 28, 5'11, 155 lb female...
I notice my heart rate jumps quite a lot when i am active. I have mild RVH from a ventricular septal defect when i was an infant. My resting heart rate is in the 60s. I deal with orthostatic hypotension at times as well.

While riding a stationary bike, for 5 minutes at 21 mph my heart rate jumps up to 180, by the time I am almost 25 minutes I am around 200 bpm. short of breath, and slightly dizzy.
I was worried if continuing to ride everyday and keeping my heart rate that high could be dangerous... besides not falling or whatever.
all of my abdominal muscles cramped up too, they are still sore, not really sure why that happened
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Jeez im glad to hear im not the only one with a high hr.  Im a 21 year old male and i use to exersize in the 170-200 range with resting in the 50s.  My heart rate would jump almost instantly when i began exersize then fall dramatically the momemt i stopped.  Thenn i went into afib and didnt exersize for a couple months.  Now i have very frequent PVCs. Wen i exersize i try to keep my heart rate low but its still up in the 180 and i stop when it goes above cuz im scarred of more arrythmias... Does anyone know if its healthy for all of us to be like this?
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Hi,
I am a 24yr old female. I am 5' 0" weigh 160lbs and seem to be having trouble losing weight. I eat healthy, was going to a women's gym, doing circuit training. I also did their weight management program which taught me how to eat. My dr has checked my thyroid and said that it is fine. Both my dr and the trainers at the gym said I was doing things right.  I recently switched from the gym I was going to, to a "real" gym. While on the eliptical machine yesterday, the machine told me my heart rate was 198. I was only exercising lightly and barely broke a sweat. I am scared for what it might have been had I actually felt I was working out. I called my dr this morning but she has yet to get back to me. I slowed down on the machine to try and lower my heart rate a little, but in order to keep it in the 180s, I was going so light the machine kept pausing, thinking I had stopped.  Once in the past, when I donated blood, they told me my resting pulse was 100. No one has ever told me this was a concern before, but the numbers on the machine at the gym certainly scared me. Is it safe for me to continue working out?
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I am a 38 yr old male 160 lb 5'2  and for about 6 years now I've been conscious of my heart rate being much higher than normal. My resting heart rate is around 90, so I very easily get over 145 when working out at the eliptic machine. Last week a doctor that was working out next to me noticed my heart rate, which was at 150 at the time and was very concerned because the speed that I was working out at was very slow (4.5 mph). He told me that we should never exceed 85% of your heart's max and that at my age, 145 should be the limit. Taking my heart rate over 145 is risking a heart attack, so I should take it easy and let my physical condition get better and my heart stronger to be able to work out at a faster speed. Hope this helps because I've been reading here about people taking it over 200, that has to be very dangerous.
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1273871 tn?1326228458
I noticed that you said your height was 5'2". Smaller adults (and children) tend to have a higher heart rate, so I would say that a resting rate of 90bpm is actually okay for you. Also, the HR monitors on gym equipment is not accurate unless used in conjunction with an electrode chest strap. According to the sensors on the (new!) treadmill at my gym, I've had my HR jump from 185 to 150 up to 190 then down to 140 all in the space of about a minute, with no change of intensity, so I just ignore it now until I can afford a decent HRM watch.
If you go by the generally used calculation (220 - age = max HR) then 85% for a 38yr old would be 154bpm, not 145.
If you take into account your resting heart rate (which in your case is already a little high)
and apply the Karvonen method *(Target HR = ((HRmax − HRrest) × % intensity) + HRrest)*
then you actually get 168bpm for your target heart rate. I'd say this is a more accurate number to go by, as it is based more on your own personal body rate than just your age.
Another thing to mention is dehydration-- if you're not keeping hydrated enough during exercise that'll push your heart-rate up too.
Hope that helps a little bit!

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Every time run and work up my self for a short time my heart start to race and I struggle to breathe and I am going to d army what can I do to build my stamina up and stop that short breathing help me plz
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1273871 tn?1326228458
Have you tried interval training? It's great at getting you fitter in a shorter space of time.

A quick intro to it, if you don't already do it;
Give yourself a 5min warm-up, then run(or jog if that's all you can manage) at about 85% max heartrate (don't go higher at this stage, as it will just exhaust you and you're trying to improve your fitness, not weaken all your muscles)  just for 1 minute. Slow right down to moderate/brisk walking pace for 90secs, this will let your heartrate come back down and allow you to breathe easy. Then go back up to a run for just another minute, etc etc, until you have your 20/30/40/whatever mins done. Make sure you cool down at the end, about 5mins. After a week, (or sooner if you train every day) increase your timings to 90secs runs and 90secs walks. Next is 2min runs and 1min walks. After that go back to 1min runs/90secs walks, but rev up your speed a bit, and continue the same patterns as before. You should find it easier by now to run faster, and knowing that you only have another 59secs or whatever to go makes it seem even more do-able, and before you know it you're running 10/15min stretches without collapsing! Hope that helps.
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Ok so I have just started biking for the first time this season. I was out yesterday and my heart rate got to about 183 after only a few minutes of biking. I am not in any way healthy which is why I am trying to get it under control...but I went to the doctor's and they said that my heart rate shouldn't be that high. But when my heart in is the "normal" range, I'm not getting a work out. At work, where I have to sit all day, my heart rate is normally around 90 (I have a heart rate watch). Should it be this high? I am already doing strength training and intervals. I wouldn't worry about it but I feel like I am going to be sick when it gets that high.
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Does anxiety run in your family? Because you may be having an anxiety attack without realizing it. Many people seem to think that they weren't anxious about anything but many thoughts are rarely acknowledged by your conscious yet still have a large impact on your emotions. Emotions have a great deal of control over the CNS and can cause spikes in HR and BP. Sometimes the fear of heart pain can be classified as an anxiety trigger. I'm not trying to say there isn't anything wrong with your heart but if the physical tests don't come up with anything I would suggest meditation to help ease your anxiety during an attack.
I also get my heart rate well into the 200's without much effort.  I have a pre-existing condition of a nerve bundling which complicates things a great deal. I find taking a multi vitamin and drinking a sugary drink as opposed to water during a work out helps keep my heart stable. Also try to avoid caffeine before a workout.
Best luck.
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I!m 65 and have had, until recently had a normal exercise experience ... Work on a treadmill and increase speed to get to a desired heart rate. About six months ago I noticed my heart rate was shooting up after moderate exercise and now will pop up to 120 with a few steps or very moderate exercise. Granted, that is not a high rate for many on this post. My resting heart rate is 50-55. I take lipitor and have good numbers but worry about muscle issues ... had sore ribs for several months. Will check my thyroid. I do have panic issues.
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I know this is old but in case anyone may read:

I had issues including high heart rate that turned out to be postural orsthatic tachacardia syndrome. It's hallmark is a heart rate increase of 30 bpm when you stand or over 120 when standing. There are other symptoms too that you may not think are connected. It can be debilitating, I'd know. A speed walk for me = 180- 195 bpm. Walking up the stairs = 160 standing= 130. Resting = 100. It suuucckks. Beta blockers help. Look into it & talk to dr cause it's common but most drs aren't very informed about it.
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I am 40 year old male and ex forces, i have started wearing a heart monitor while exersising, and have noticed my heart rate is high while exersising (eg) today 9-5-11 i ran 6.7 mile in 1hr 7 mins and my heart rate was 180-190 do i run a rick of having a heart attack if i keep it up,  and i am trying my hardest to watch what i eat. please can someone enlighten me
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877736 tn?1240259222
roobsta:

I like your theory about the heart muscle growth, it is better than the Doctor's theory which is nothing.

Roobsta and Naenae9155:

My Cardio Fitness test results were that I am in the top 95% of heart health, my oxygen utilization was above normal, etc. etc - my HR was 195 at peak but did not alarm the tester, and I could not catch my breath - also no alarm for them.

I then had an echo done, and they injected bubbles into my veins to better view the heart wall structures and to more clearly see holes in the walls, should there be any - bottom line, all systems go.

I am still answerless which is okay for now.  I am being medically discharged from the Army for other medical reasons and have not been actively engaged in cardio activity for about a year - which is a blessing since I cannot perform to standard anyway :)

Once I am healthier and medication free I have every intention to re-engage my physical stamina... I miss my adrenaline rushes. LOL

I had never even considered over training, nor was it suggested by the professionals.  I do hope that is the answer, though, because that is TOO EASY to fix :)))

sorry for the hugely delayed replies, I have been terribly busy with my other issues.  Hopefully you will see this reply.  Good luck to you!

shany25m
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I'm a 46 y.o. male, 5'5", 155 lbs.  My resting heart rate is 60-80 bpm and about 55 bpm when I wake up. I've always had a faster heart rate all my life.  I run 3 miles 3 times per week.  I also workout with weights and do other cross training and have done so most of my life.  Over the last year, I noticed that my heart rate during intense exercise was reaching 180-190 bpm (after I built up to a sprint) and during the steady pace part of my run was averaging about 160 bpm.  Last year, it was only about 145-160 bpm max.  Recently, I noticed that my heart rate reached 200+ bpm on similar runs and a couple times stayed at 200+ for 30 minutes AFTER I finished running and was just sitting.  I went to the doctor and had an EKG which came back normal and my blood pressure was also normal.  I started to deduce (besides aging) what I was doing differently and I came up with a list of things that I had been doing more of the past year.  1.  Being stressed, feeling anxious more than usual the past 2 years.  2.  Drinking ice teas during lunch and having green tea every day (lots more caffeine than I'm used to as I'm not a coffee drinker).  3.  Eating/snacking more (especially chips like Doritos).  4.  Sleeping irregularly.  Immediately, I saw that it seemed like each of these activities could be feeding each other.  The caffeine from the ice teas and green tea were adding to my anxiety and stress and also preventing me from getting a solid night's worth of sleep, which in turn was making me weaker and more fatigued overall.  The most interesting thing I found was that I also seemed to have an adverse reaction to MSG, which is a known heart rate increaser.  I was dosing-up my body with MSG each time I snacked on Doritos after or between meals.  One weekend (the one after which I had the 200+ heart rate that didn't come down for 30 min), I had an especially MSG-filled weekend as I had a large bowl of soup and pickled condiments which must have been laden with MSG.  I also had several servings of Doritos.  The most interesting of all these MSG-related facts I found is that the protein drinks and protein bars that I have been using before and after workouts (Whey Protein) has the same exact effect as MSG.  In fact if you look-up hidden sources of MSG, you will find most proteins are "free glutamates" just like MSG, in addition to many flavor enhancers in chips and other food not labelled as MSG.  You can imagine, that one weekend, I had MSG soup, MSG chips and MSG protein.  Combined with my tea drinking and lack of sleep, it produced a perfect storm of fast heart rate.  I've since tried to relax more, cut out the caffeine and chips as well as the protein drink and now I'm back to 160-180 bpm during moderate to hard exercise.  I'm hoping to bring it down more with continued awareness and vigilance.  Best of luck and good health wishes to all of you.
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I'm a 46 y.o. male, 5'5", 155 lbs.  My resting heart rate is 60-80 and about 55 bpm when I wake up. I've always had a faster heart rate all my life.  I run 3 miles 3 times per week.  I also workout with weights and do other cross training and have done so most of my life.  Recently I noticed that my heart rate during intense exercise was reaching 180-190 bpm (after I built up to a sprint) and during steady pace part of my run was averaging about 160 bpm.  Recently, I noticed that my heart rate reached 200+ bpm on similar runs and a couple times stayed at 200+ for 30 minutes AFTER I finished running and was just sitting.  I went to the doctor and had an EKG which came back normal.  I started to deduce (besides aging) what I was doing differently and I came up with a list of things that I had been doing more of.  1.  Being stressed, feeling anxious more than usual the past 2 years.  2.  Drinking ice teas during lunch and having green tea every day (lots more caffeine than I'm used to as I'm not a coffee drinker).  3.  Eating/snacking more (especially chips like Doritos).  4.  Sleeping irregularly.  Immediately, I saw that it seemed like each of these activities could be feeding each other.  The caffeine from the ice teas and green tea were adding to my anxiety and stress and also preventing me from getting a solid night's worth of sleep, which in turn was making me weaker and more fatigued overall.  The most interesting thing I found was that I also seemed to have an adverse reaction to MSG, which is a known heart rate increaser.  I was dosing-up my body with MSG each time I snacked on Doritos after or between meals.  One weekend (the one after which I had the 200+ heart rate that didn't come down for 30 min), I had an especially MSG-filled weekend as I had a large bowl of soup and pickled condiments which must have been laden with MSG.  I also had several servings of Doritos.  The most interesting of all these MSG-related facts I found is that the protein drinks and protein bars that I have been using before and after workouts (Whey Protein) has the same exact effect as MSG.  In fact if you look-up hidden sources of MSG, you will find most proteins are "free glutamates" just like MSG, in addition to many flavor enhancers in chips and other food not labelled as MSG.  You can imagine, that one weekend, I had MSG soup, MSG chips and MSG protein.  Combined with my tea drinking and lack of sleep, it produced a perfect storm of fast heart rate.  I've since tried to relax more, cut out the caffeine and chips as well as the protein drink and now I'm back to 160-180 bpm during moderate to hard exercise.  I'm hoping to bring it down more with continued awareness and vigilance.  Best of luck and good health wishes to all of you.
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Can someone tell me why when testing heart rate during exercise - someones heart rate can be higher before light exercise then after?
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I bought a heart monitor a week ago. I'm 39 and more or less fit, so I should have a MHR around 181. My minimum heart rate is 56-58. Well, I start jogging, and I'm 160. When running at my average level, 5:40 min/Km I'm +185, and when I go uphill, it goes well +200. I can assure you I'm totally OK, really confortable. Those formulae to calculate the MHR must give an average, but there is obviously a very wide range over and under that level. My conclusion is that a lot of people must be very under or over training.
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I am a 56 yo male, 6'0", 210 lbs (was abt 225 for awhile) never smoked, minor alcohol during college years, tea-totaller until two years ago, now a glass of red wine each of about 5 days per week.  Was very, very active in college, but career led me to become fairly sedentary.  Always had a low resting heart rate (now 58-60 when I wake up before getting out of bed).  I have PVCs -- I sometimes have a "run" of these that lasts maybe 10 seconds that will leave me light-headed and anxious, but I've learned to recognize what it is and relax through it.  I sometimes had these 1-2 times per week, but much less frequently now (and was rarely related to exertion).  I had exhaustive heart tests (stress, nuclear, etc) about seven months ago and was found to be "out of shape" but no real problems.

Enough background ...

Anyway, I was 220 lbs again two months ago, and decided to: (a) cut out most red meat from my diet; (b) cut all carbonated beverages (I don't drink coffee, and rarely have tea); (c) eliminate nearly all sweets/desert (well, *sometimes* I treat myself to an ice cream).  I still eat cheese and other non-healthy things.  I also started back on the treadmill.  Always 30 minutes, with a base rate of 4.0mph, with 2 to 3 short sprints (7.0mph for 1 to 1.5 minutes, stopping when I just can't go any more).  My heart gets to about 110bpm after about 6 mins at 4.0, which is when I generally do my first sprint.  It reaches about 151, then I go back to 4.0, and it settles after a minute or two to about 116bpm.  About 5 mins later, I repeat, and the heart goes to about 156, then settles to about 120-122bpm. I am soaked in sweat after the second sprint.  If it gets back under 120, I'll do another sprint, but then it will only settle to about 124 and not lower.

Last night, I was on my second sprint and it hit 162 after 1.24 min.  I slowed to 4.0, expecting it to settle back as usual. This time, however, it took longer to slow, went down to 156bpm, then started rising again to 163 and wouldn't lower (my breathing, though, was recovering some).  I felt a bit light-headed, stopped and laid down.  It did settle, of course, but it scared me.  Am I over-doing it?

I have lost 10 lbs (to 210), but want to lose another 20 and strengthen my heart.

Thanks in advance!
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So i kind of have the same problem as everyone else but its a little different. I'm 20 years old, 4'11 and 120 pounds, I already have been diagnosed with a irregular heart beat and have a mediatronic chip implanted in my chest to monitor my heart beat so the doctors can figure out what goes on when i sometimes pass out (my cardiologist hasnt been working too hard to find out whats the real problem) Anyways i just got a gym membership and noticed the machines keep turning off on me because my heart rate gets maxed out within LITTERALLY 2 minutes of walking on the treadmill. I even met with a personal trainer to figure out what excersizes would be best for my high heart rate and she basically told me just to diet and go on short walks, ya again not alot of help! i feel fine when i work out i know my limits to when im going to pass out i just want to know if i ignore my heart rate what is the worst thing that could happen to me?...
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I don't know as an expert, but I had similar "feelings"some number of years ago.  It turned out that I had a collapsed artery.  We were not able to determine that without having an angiogram.  Angioplasty was performed while we were in, and was fine for almost 10 years.  Finally had to have stents inserted, and have been excellent for about 7 years more.  I would get a second opinion.  I Had three opinions before the final cardiologist said there was no way to be sure without an Angiogram.  He was right. I am also on Metoprolol Succinate ER (Toprol generic) 25mg, plus Lipitor.  I am 66 years old, walk 4.5 miles in under an hour "every" day.  I take my meds religiously, and watch my diet (to some extent).  Feel great.
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my resting heartrate is 90. so if i subtract that from 180, I get 90. So, how do I even exercise at all? I have HBP & must lose weight so I started to try to workout, & I say 'try' because after 1 minute of just walking slowly my heartrate is up to 130 & I get chest tightening & pains. suggestions?
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A long time since you posted your comments (2006) But they seem most relevant to my circumstances. I am a mountaineer who trains hard. My resting pulse is between 48 and 50, but when I am working at max. output I sometimes experience a constriction feeling either side of my larynx which I know will be followed by a rapid increase in my pulse (I wear a HR monitor). So a pulse of 140 will climb very rapidly to 218. Yesterday I hit 228. Within two minutes of stopping exercise, the pulse is plummeting back down to around 130.  I am in my late 50's. Although the feeling is uncomfortable, there is no pain. No doctor has been able to say what is going on. As a fellow 'sufferer', what are your thoughts? regards  Tim Ralph
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If your resting heart rate is naturally high you might want to go and get a blood test for thyroid activity. A Hyperactive Thyroid means that your body metabolises at a higher rate than it should which means symptoms include high heart rates, heart palpitations and sometimes intestinal disturbances such as diarrhoea. It's very under diagnosed, yet extremely common.
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Just read your post from 2009 and am curious where you are condition wise at this point 3 years later.  www.ganious.com
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I am 62 and like others here find my heart rate exceeds text book norms when I exercise. It can pop up to 158 quite easily when cycling, even though I am not feeling especially stressed physically. I had a thorough heart evaluation the other day as I was getting mild chest pains and was told my heart is fine except for a very small and inconsequential valve leak. My wife, 58, also likes to exercise and has real difficulty getting her heart above 145. My instinct is that heart rate is not a good measure of heart health and I have stopped worrying about my heart rate when exercising. I do however try and train at lower heart rate levels as I believe this increases fitness faster than busting a gut at very elevated heart rate levels every time one goes training.  
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My heart rate has been known to get over 200 upon exertion (cardio). It concerned me some, but not enough to set an alarm on my heart rate monitor to warn me to back off. Well two weeks ago I rode in a 28 mile bike ride. It was hilly and my report from my heart monitor showed that I did exceed 210 for a period of time. I was tired but felt maybe we could have rode the longer route. We them had a wonderful evening of dancing. THREE days later after working out, making dinner, eating and lounging I began to feel a pain in the underside of my left arm. My hand didn't feel right, like it wasn't getting enough blood. Then a little pain high in my chest. I took two baby aspirin (could of take 3) then we took my blood pressure. It was 196/93 WOW! Mine is usually nice and low. Off to the hospital. (Call and ambulance, don't drive yourself. they have things to help) At the hospital I had a nice sinus rhythm, my first blood draw showed nothing. They did put a Nitro patch on me though. ECG looked fine. Well, thank God they kept me and did another blood draw. It takes time for the enzymes that say "heart attack" to show. Sure enough I had had one. The did  a heart cath in the morning. I am very grateful for the quality of care i received. They found a tear in one of my arteries. There are multiple layers in the artery. This allowed blood to get between the layers, clot and cause a block.
I am in excellent shape, no heart decease, nice smooth arteries. This is a fairly uncommon thing. But if you look up SCAD Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection you will find that over 50%  die from this before they get to the hospital. Usually woman that are young and in shape. Sometimes happens to men as well.
So know 10 days out I have a plan. I have set alarms on my heart monitor that tell me where my rate is so I can hopefully avoid doing this to myself. They don't know much about this, so I recommend not getting this diagnosis. Take care of yourselves.
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My daughter is really fit.  15 Years old.  Last August ran 3200 Meters in 12:20 at age 14.  Started having menstrual issues and medicated to regulate.  Noticed in track workout that her heart rate is getting up to 190-200 on easy to moderate work.  I coached her in XC in fall and this didn't happen but now in track it is climbing fast and she is going into oxygen debt quickly and struggling to run any event longer than 400 meters.  She has allergies and asthma also and is medicated for both.  Waiting on results from EKG and pft.  I'm nervous about letting her finish the season.  Any thoughts?
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