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Umbilical hernia
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Umbilical hernia

Hi, I am 38, fit and regulary exercise. I have just noticed I have a small hernia right in my belly button which has turned it from an inny to an outy. I am able to push the hernia in and I can feel the 'Stuff' popping back in side. Over a short time or with a little abdominal pressure it pops back out.

I have been to the doctors and he has said that there is nothing to worry about, he does not think i need surgery but I should lay off the gym. I am really unhappy with this but he, in not so many words said that this was tuff.

Could someone qualified (i.e. not just an opionion please.) tell me what my options are.

1) Are there any weight training exercises I can still do or any that I should definatly stay away from?
2) Can I use a truss or a belt during weight training?
3) Is a cross training machine OK?
4) Could surgey put me back in the Gym full time?
5) I have read about people haveing a mesh inserted instead of sutures, could this be a better way to go?
Is there any other advice you can offer?

Thanks to the qualified people who take the time to comment on these forums, I know you dont have to.

Ian (Sad and desperate)
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3 Comments Post a Comment
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1236893_tn?1408490528
Was the doctor a GP a surgeon? My opinion is to have surgery! If at all possible NOT to have mesh!! Avoid any activity that increases pressure in your abdomen!! What you have is your intestines protruding through the muscles of your abdominal wall. It's possible that your intestine can twist and then you would need emergency surgery. Avoid lifting weights!! You can usually go about your normal workout routine. "Can I use a truss or a belt during weight training" NO!!!! "cross training machine" Yes as long as you're not putting
pressure in your abdomen!!
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5920116_tn?1376756442
I'm not a doctor or in the medical field. I just had my umbilical hernia surgery 2.5 weeks ago with mesh. If you have the surgery without mesh you could have another hernia as your putting strain down below and it could come through another weak point. It also can get bigger and quite ugly. It is your intestines that you are pushing and squishing back into your body.

It's amazing how much we use stomach. Anything you do while working out, you will use your stomach muscles. A support belt would help you out. One doctor said I was fine not to have the surgery. After 5 years it got bigger and started to burn. Problem solved right now. I just want to get back to the gym. You should be able to start at the gym 4 weeks lightly and 6 weeks slowly get back into your normal workout.
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1236893_tn?1408490528
Hernia recurrence is the most common complication of hernia operations, including those in which mesh is used. The causes are improper surgical technique, shrinkage of the mesh, and movement or migration of the mesh. Second and subsequent hernia operations at the same site are more challenging and prone to failure than first attempts.

Mesh is designed and processed to be implanted, your body recognizes it as a foreign substance. The reaction to it and its inhibition of your natural defense mechanisms against germs increase the chance of infection of the mesh and surrounding tissues. Some infections can be treated with antibiotics but others require removal of the mesh and another solution for repairing the hernia.

Inside the abdominal cavity, mesh may become stuck to part of the bowel. There is usually no negative effect, but in some cases, the mesh can kink the intestine and cause a blockage, which requires surgical correction. It is also possible for mesh to erode through the wall of the intestine, leading to leakage of bowel contents. Placement of the mesh outside the abdominal cavity reduces the risk of intestinal complications but may result in erosion through skin. Exposed mesh is only rarely salvageable and most often must be removed for healing to take place.

Some discomfort after a procedure. It usually diminishes fairly rapidly. Moderate to severe pain that persists especially if searing or electric may be a sign of nerve entrapment by either the mesh or the sutures or staples used to anchor it in place. A local anesthetic injected into the site may eliminate the pain. Another surgery is sometimes necessary to release the nerve.
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