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Black spot in vision
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Black spot in vision

When I wake up every morning and open my eyes, there is a black spot there that fades in about 1 second or so.  If I shut my eyes and open them again, it happens again. But after about a minute it doesn't happen again.  Looking up at it, the spot is probably about the same size as the lightbulb on the ceiling looks from lying in bed (hope that makes sense) and is fuzzy round the edges.  I'm guessing it has something to do with lying down and not moving my eyes for hours.  But what is it and should I see my doctor, or my optician about this?  It's been going on for a few weeks now.
I'm 39, female, in good health, have worn glasses since about age 12.
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This could be some type of floater (most likely) or other vitreous or retinal disorder.  Yes you should call your ophthalmologist and be seen to have it evaluated.

MJK MD
10 Comments
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Thanks for that.  I will make an appointment asap.
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Finally got to the optometrist.  Aside from this issue he's determined that my contacts are too strong. So we're fixing that.  He thought this may be a floater of some kind, but not once I told him it was there even when I had only one of either eyes open.  I've also noticed that, if I blink rapidly the spot become quite well defined and white, not grey/black.  The optometrist is going to discuss this with his colleagues and get back to me.  From there I think it's likely I'll get referred to an eye specialist.
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233759_tn?1210480396
Just a suggestion...

You really need to see an ophthalmologist (a medical doctor specializing in eye conditions & diseases)  instead of a optometrist who has not attended medical school but  is a person who is professionally trained and licensed to examine the eyes for visual defects, diagnose problems or impairments, and prescribe corrective lenses or provide other types of treatment.

The optomerist having to ask his colleagues for their opinion doesn't sound very re-assuring in his ability to treat what is wrong with you.  What if this is something serious?
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Avatar_f_tn
Yes, I agree. He's consulted with his colleagues and they all think it is nothing to be concerned about, but that they could refer me to a specialist if I wanted.  So I think I'll take them up on that and see the specialist.  In fact I'll call them now to arrange the referral.
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Avatar_m_tn
Generally if optometrists are unsure, the will write a referal letter to an opthalmologist sometimes via a GP. From your first post i would have guessed it to be a floater or maybe even a vitreous haemorrhage.

As this black spot appeared quite recently it would be a good idea to see an opthalmoligist quite soon.

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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks stedro.  The optometrist thought floater, but then wasn't so sure with it being the same whether I had one eye (left or right) or both open.  It seems floaters are usually debris in the eye, so I would have to have identical debris in both eyes to see it with either.
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Avatar_f_tn
Optometrists are not for daignosing eye conditions. Please see an ophthalmologist quickly.

The optometrist is taking a risk with your eyes by not referring you.He is not an eye MD. He makes glasses. BIG dif.
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Avatar_n_tn
Optometrist ARE actually for diagnosing eye conditions and ocular diseases and some systemic diseases too.  I, myselft being an optometrist can't stand the ignorance when people speak of other professional professions that they have no idea about.  
Just a suggestion...

"You really need to see an ophthalmologist (a medical doctor specializing in eye conditions & diseases)  instead of a optometrist who has not attended medical school but  is a person who is professionally trained and licensed to examine the eyes for visual defects, diagnose problems or impairments, and prescribe corrective lenses or provide other types of treatment.

The optomerist having to ask his colleagues for their opinion doesn't sound very re-assuring in his ability to treat what is wrong with you.  What if this is something serious? "
Are you serious? You must know every single doctor out there whether it be the best in the world does not know everything possible.  To make a correct decision for the best benfit of the patent doctors do speak with other doctors to go over cases with different patients.  Before anyone bad mouths Optometrists, we go to optometry school for 4 years post grad and got a doctorate degree.  We are Optometric physicians and treat a broad range of ocular diseases. Not only do we prescribe antibiotics for the eye we also prescribe orals for sysmetic disease related to the eye.  We just dont fit contacts and glasses. Get your facts straight before you go off bad mouthing optometrists, opthalmologists are offended by us because we take business away from them.  
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Avatar_f_tn
I had a wonderful optometrist...who should have REFERRED me when complications arose that he was incompetent to handle but thought that he could.  As a naive consumer, I had no idea that the level of training differed so drastically between optometrists and ophthalmologists.  In my opinion, both professions offer specialized treatment - but in different arenas.  For ANY eye disease, I would only see an ophthalmologist who is better trained to diagnose and treat the problem.  But for a contact lens fitting and refraction, I would choose a reputable optometrist, who, in my experience, is better at performing these services than the techs in the ophthamologists' offices.  Rather than competing, the service patterns should differ according to expertise, and offer complementary service that best meets patient need.  And as I always say, I sincerely hope that altruistic motives trump the egotistical and financial ones.
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A related discussion, Black spot in vision was started.
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A related discussion, large black spot seen with both eyes was started.
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