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When I stand up suddenly and quickly, I sometimes lose my vision for a few seconds and my head feels fuzzy plus my eyes feel a little puffy. The blackness starts from around the edges and it doesn't always manage to cover up my entire sight, but when it does, it usually lasts longer. Is this an eye problem? Or is it just because there wasn't enough blood in my head? Does that mean there is a problem somewhere else in my body?
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233488_tn?1310696703
It could well be orthostatic hypotension but the same thing sometimes occurs in pseudotumor cerebri and with some heart conditions especially slow rythms.

See an Eye MD and see a Internist or GP to be sure.

JCH III MD
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You may have a condition called orthostatic hypotension where the blood pools in the lower body (usually the feet), the lack of vision is caused by this lower blood pressure. Try standing up slowly and see if the condition remedies itself. For a good example check wikipedia or http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/medical/orthostatic.html .
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