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Help with posterior vitreous degeneration
Hi  I am 56 years old and am somewhat nearsighted and never had a floater in my eye.  Then one day, halfway through my day, I blink and when I open my right eye, it looks like a giant mosquito has landed "splat" against my eye.  A fast visit to my Optometrist with eye dialtion and eye pictures, I am told I have developed floaters.  The next day, I start to also get the flashes in my peripheral vision of the same eye.  Again, an immediate visit to the Optometrist with the same eye dilation and pictures--I am know told I have PVD-posterior vitreous detachment--and to just keep checking it to make sure I don't get a retinal detachment.  The flashes come a lot --whenever I move my eye to the left or if I am out at night --but I have since seen a Opthomalogist who dilated and examined the eye a few days later, and no retinal hole was seen.  This doctor said  not to do certain exercise--like running or golfing--even fast walking as any extra pressure on the eye can lead to the retina detaching.  But it has been a week and a half nothing has changed!! and I don't know how long this acute phase of PVD should last?? If it goes on another week the same as it is--Is this normal?? When should I get this checked again??--once a week?? etc.  Is there anything I can do to prevent the retina from detaching??  It seems the longer I see these flashes, the higher my risk of retinal detachment --Is this true??  Does bending down or reading--where my eye is going back and forth rapidly --raise the risk of the retinal detaching??  How about medications--are there any known to increase the vitreus degeneration--like anti-depressants, high-blood pressure, bone density drugs, sleep medications etc -- No one in my family history has ever had this situation so I am wondering if my diet and lifestyle has beed a major cause or is it more a genetic thing? and what can I do know to prevent  further degeneration  from occurring in my other eye???  And does my having such an acute Posterior vitreus detachment mean that I will be more likely to have other age related vision issues???  Help?? Please??


This discussion is related to vitreous detachment.
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233488 tn?1310696703
Posterior vitreous detachment is a normal part of the aging eye. Use the search feature and read the previous posts and discussions. Go to Google IMAGES and see pictures of what it looks like.

It takes a variable time for the vitreous to peel off the retina. The biggest risk of a RD is within the first 6 weeks. I can only tell you what I tell my patients.

I check the eye and if they have floaters but no flashes normal activies are fine. I always think its a good idea to avoid things that bang the head around (amusement park rides, boding, full contact hockey, etc). I give written information onf PVD and RD. If the floaters increase, flashes develop or loss of peripheral vision occures return immediately as an emergency.  Warn the other eye will have the same problem some day.

If there is flashes or high risk characteristics (high myopia, previous cataract surgery, family history of RD, area of lattice, etc)  I ask they avoid heavy bending stooping or lifting. I do not restrict walking or golf.  I DO set up a follow appointment in our retina clinic to see our retina specialist in 7-10 days in follow up. If symptoms worse return immediately.

your Eye MD will need to set your activies. I would suggest you go back for a re-exam since your problem is continuing or see a retina Eye MD specialist. Find one near you at www.aao.org

JCH MD
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203589 tn?1267478770
first off your questions have already been answered in previous posts if you'd do a simple search you'd find the answers. But i'll answer your questions anyway:
If you went to an ophthalmologist s/he should have set you up w/ a follow-up appointment.
Generally the time reference is 6 weeks. This means that if a retinal detachment is going to happen it usually happens within 6 weeks from the onset of symptoms. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. If the vitreous is "sticky" enough to pull on the retina it will do so no matter what.
Medications do not increase the rate of PVD. PVD is age related and a complete detachment of the vitreous can take anywhere from 18-24 months. PVD is not preventable. PVDs do not increase your risks of developing other age related problems.
Google posterior vitreous detachment and you'll find lots of information.
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Hi Thanks for your response.  I have googled PVD and read many of your replies already listed but I still had questions.   May I ask you--when you see the flashes around the peripheral of the eye--Is that the actual vitreous gel sticking to the retinal wall??  When I had my eyes dilated and pictures taken the dr showed me an area where there was sticking occurring.  Does this sticking happen with all cases of PVD or does this mean I am more likely to have a retinal detachment??  Please excuse me if I am repeating answers you have given already.  Thanks
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233488 tn?1310696703
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Hi  Thanks for your time and response!!
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233488 tn?1310696703
You are welcome. I have PVDs in both eyes, myopia, lattice degeneration and retinoschesis so I am emphathetic (all conditions stable for 30 years).

JCH MD
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203589 tn?1267478770
When your brain sees flashes it is b/c the vitreous has become stuck to the retina and is pulling/tugging on it. So the actual flash that you see is due to the tugging force of the vitreous gel, not when the get is sticking to the retina.
You should know that the vitreous is a clear-jelly like substance and often referred to as vitreous gel. The vitreous is normally "stuck" in a sense to the retina, but more strongly in some places than in others. When a person ages the vitreous gel changes and becomes more liquid as opposed to gel-like. This process begins PVD, b/c as the vitreous liquefies it starts to "un-stick" from the retina. Since some of the portions of the vitreous is adhered more strongly than others as the vitreous detaches it may pull more strongly on certain parts of the retina causing your brain to see this as flashes of light. Now you maybe thinking wait if gel is turning into liquid shouldn't that mean the vitreous should peel away from the retina w/o problems?
The explanation is simple: the vitreous is sort of made of two parts an inner portion and outer portion. The inner portion liquefies more causing the outer portion to come away from the retina.
So, after a long explanation, the final answer to your question, is NO you are not at greater risk b/c of the "sticking" b/c everyone w/PVD has "sticking". However, you are at greater risk for having a RD b/c you are myopic.
Hope this all made sense and was helpful.
Good luck and I really hope you don't have to experience an RD..
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233488 tn?1310696703
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Is it easily discernable on clinical exam to determine whether PVD is complete?  If PVD is complete, does this lower risk of RD after cataract surgery?
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Hi  Thanks again for your response--it helped alot!!  I too hope I don't get an RD!! Take care--Carol
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No not always.
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I suffered a posterior vitreous detachment on 10/28/08.  I noticed a little flash in my left peripheral vision that did not go away.  I had my eyes dilated the next afternoon and they could not see any tear but told me to come back if I experienced increases in floaters or more flashing or the curtain.  The next day, I had a large floater and called the doctor again.  The following day, they dilated my left eye and did not see any retinal tear.  Two doctors told me that I had NO restrictions on exercise and an appointment was made for me to see the retinal specialist on 12-8-08 (6 weeks).  I have since spoken to another doctor who said to limit actitivity until I see the specialist.  Several acquaintances have been alarmed that with the flash continuing that I am not being told to see the retinal specialist right away.  Do you think I should be seeing the retinal specialist sooner?  What about exericse?  I usually do elipse trainining, walking and lifting light weights.  I am 57 years old.  Thanks!
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I have "a half-ring shadow" in peripheral vision of the left eye which I see in the darkness and after waking up. I also have some kind of "stroboscope effect" in the upper part of the eye and the eye is severly hurting inside and "heavy". The vision in this corner of the eye is blurred -I am not able to judge if those are floaters.  My retinologist said that it is due to PDV which is probably almost complete or already complete. She said I should not have any severe physical activities, no bending down and carrying heavy stuff .
My question are :
1. could this "half-ring effect" and blurry vision be provoked by laser to retina that I had 1,5 week ago?
2. will this "half-ring" ever disappear?
3. Am I probable to loose any vision in the eye?
Thank you in advance.
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I was just diagnosed with vitreous degeneration.  I am 62 years old.  I see a few floaters but is not bothersome.  I had lasik for both eyes about three years ago.  My right eye for distance and left for close up.  It works fine except for real close then I need magnifying glass or glasses.  I was wondering if by having this done three years ago if it was good or bad regarding vitreous degeneration because i read it could also have been caused from injury or age related.
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Hi Dr. Hagan,

My retina specialist said that my vitreous has degenerated and liquefied.  Is that why my vision is blurry, since the vitreous is constantly changing? and getting flashes of light?

I heard that you had PVD in both eyes, how did you manage to live through it for 30 years, any helpful tips?.  I am only 32 years old and highly myopic.  Since the vitreous is degenerated, what are the chances of getting retinal detachment.  Are there any solutions to it apart from Vitrectomy?

My optometrist thinks that I am paranoid, when I tell her all the vision problems I am going through.  Please advise.

Thanks,
Sophiya
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Hi, I am only 44 and myopia -7.50. And was diagnosed with vitreous degeneration detachment in one eye so the laser eye correction stops or reduces the chances of getting retinal detachment as I shrinks the retina. Any body .Thank you so much for your thought and time.
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Hi, I am only 44 and myopia -7.50. And was diagnosed with vitreous degeneration detachment in one eye so the laser eye correction stops or reduces the chances of getting retinal detachment as I shrinks the retina. Any body .Thank you so much for your thought and time.
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19203402 tn?1473884798
Hi, I am 66 years old , former airline pilot and I live in Europe .I have always had an excellent vision at day and night and today still 11 on the scale. Early Aug 2016 I experienced very light flashes on the right eye not however on the left. I went to local eye clinic ( in Switzerland ) and my eyes were examined by a young woman ( doctor ) who may have graduated the university not longer than year ago. She applied anesthetic droplets to allow inspection with slit lamp ( biometric microscope ) . During the slit test I felt a short pain on right cornea . Before I never had any floaters nor type of problems neither PVD was found on my eyes. After the test a thin floater of the size of a hair developed which after two days of applying black tea vannished and flashes disappeared just a few days later . What remained was a small floater of the size of a mousquito on right eye and on left eye two tinny mouche vollantes when I look to the sky and very tinny fog  on center of both eyes which becomes noticable when i move the eyes . One month or more after that test I experience ( rarely) very short light traces when I move left or right eye mainly at night and sometimes not at all .Question can the slit test adversarely affect the eyes given the agging of my due to light intensity and fasten the PV Degradation ?  how safe is the slit test ?
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19203402 tn?1473884798
PS ; I both a medication called Vitalux Plus which seems to be good for the health of the eyes...what is your opinion about above comment and this medication ?
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177275 tn?1438375244
The slit lamp (biomicroscope) exam and dilation of the pupils are safe and do not cause floaters. However they are used to examine eyes that have or are prone to floaters. The relationship is incidental and not causative.

Vitalux plus has not been tested in a controlled fashion in large numbers of clinical patients.  It might be helpful for someone with a terrible diet. A good diet would be better
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