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How is your vision after Cataract Surgery?
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How is your vision after Cataract Surgery?

How is your vision after Cataract Surgery?
Please specify whether you got a monofocal or multifocal/accommodative IOL.

I would like to know what distances you are able to see clearly. What distances are slightly blurry, but acceptable, and what distances are just unbearably blurry.

I am particularly interested in those who have received Monofocal IOL set to Distance but I would also really appreciate hearing those experiences with different IOLs. I have heard from several people that with a IOL Set to Distance, they are still able to use the Computer at about 18 inches. This has confused me since I had thought IOL set to distance makes intermediate distance blurry.

Thanks!
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102 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_f_tn
Both my eyes are at plano with monofocal IOLs.  My distance vision is excellent.  It would be a strain for me to see my monitor without glasses.  Prolonged computer use without glasses would probably give me a headache.  If you set your dominant eye for distance and non-dominant eye for intermediate vision, you would probably be comfortable using the computer without glasses.

I had a cataract in one eye only but I chose to have cataract surgery in both my eyes.  My post-surgery distance vision in the eye without the cataract is at least as good as my best-correct vision was before surgery.  I've never had a problem with my IOLs.
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This past January, I had both eyes done with Acrysoft monofocal IOL's set for distance. I now have 20/20 vision and only need readers for close up reading. Depth of field is excellent from about 20 inches to infinity. I have a large monitor 24" and can sit back in my chair and read it perfectly without glasses. My wife also had hers done last month and needed the Acrosoft toric lens, she had minor astigmatism, set for distance as well. She's a waitress and was concerned about reading the menus and working their computer, but she has no trouble at all without glasses. Like me, she only needs cheap readers for close up work. You can search my previous posting about my experiences. Let me know if you are in Houston. I had mine done at Berkley Eye Center. Good luck.
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Avatar_f_tn
I had only one cataract, received same IOL set for distance as baggyrinkle, I now do not wear glasses at all for the first time since age 18 mos.  Can see to drive better than I ever could with glasses, and do not need glasses to use the computer or read normal sized print.  I use a magnifying glass for extremely small print, same as when I wore prescription progressive lens glasses.
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Avatar_f_tn
There are many factors that have to be considered with each individual's eyes. I have both eyes done with Tecnis monofocal lens after having the Restor multifocal explanted from the left eye . I have both eyes set for distance . I was astonished at how good my intermediate and close vision turned out. My vision is excellent.  I can use  the computer and sit back in my chair and read the  15" screen and do just about everything glasses free.  I need glasses for small print.  Like baggyrinkle I use the cheap readers.  I have no problem with driving and my night driving vision is terrific. No starbursts or glare as with the Restor.  I am so pleased with the outcome with these Tecnis lenses.  After having had both, I recommend the monofocal lens.  Tecnis has an informative web site you may want to check out. This site was recommended to me by JodieJ.   Good luck :)
  
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757137_tn?1347200053
I had tentatively planned on getting the Tecnis monofocal set for distance. Your post is much appreciated because it answers my question about how closely one can see clearly. I presume you have the aspheric acetate 1-piece lens. Is that correct? Thanks again.
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Avatar_f_tn
It's not the brand of aspheric monofocal IOL that lets you see up close (or not) when your IOL is set for distance vision--it's your eyes.  Your pupil size can make a difference.  Smaller pupils are supposed to have more depth of focus than larger pupils (like mine).  On the other hand, larger pupils are better able to utilize the benefits of having an aspheric IOL.  (These benefits are explained in the patient education video at www tecnisiol com, and they don't apply to only Tecnis IOLs.)  Another point--conventional IOLs provide better depth of focus (i.e., better near vision when the IOL is set for distance) than aspheric IOLs.  But an aspheric IOL provides better distance vision than a conventional IOL.  (Whether or not these differences are truly meaningful is another question.)  There's a lot of marketing hype put out by the IOL manufacturers.  It's probably best to let your surgeon choose the brand of monofocal IOL.  If s/he has a lot of experience with a particular IOL brand/model, that experience can be factored into the power calculations to get you closer to your targeted refraction.  This will make a meaningful difference.  Having an experienced surgeon is a real advantage.  
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Avatar_m_tn
My Acrysoft monofocal left me at plano for one month. During the next month it went to +1.0. Vision is blurry at all distances. Lenses mostly correct this but also have glare, halos, etc.
Since this is my "good" eye my two doctors say I should live with it. So not a happy camper.
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Avatar_f_tn
"Live with it" translates to: "There is nothing that I know how to do to fix this."  You need to see another doctor--preferably someone with special skills at fixing problems.  You might try calling the ophthalmology department of a major medical center to set up an appointment with a senior faculty member who specializes in cataract surgery.  It might be worth traveling to see a doctor with special skills.
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Your comments are very helpful. (By the way I meant to say "acrylic" not "acetate.") I have small pupils and, before presbyopia set in, had no eye problems, not even astigmatism. Both my sister and brother have had excellent results with monofocals set for distance, and my brother mentioned that he does not need glasses for reading. Perhaps, since he had his surgery a few years ago, his lenses are not aspheric.

I certainly will take the advice of the surgeon, but it helps to be a knowledgeable patient. Otherwise I might become enamored of the ReZoom.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have the Tecnis Acrylic IOL. I was at a point where I would have gone back to progressive glasses again as long as the Restor was out!  After discussing with my surgeon just what I wanted achieve with my vision, he recommended the Tecnis for distance. As I stated before, the results were excellent.  I too had healthy eyes and needed glasses because of presbyopia until the cataracts.  Good luck to you.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have the alcon acrylic toric iols, implanted in both eyes one year ago (August 2009).  They are set for distance w/ slightly different powers.  I can see the tv clearly at 6' away with one eye, yet the other eye is set for about 10'.  I can see great outside, but for most things inside I wear progressive bifocals (clear at the top, 1.25 middle, and 2.50 bottom); this is sooo much easier than having different powered readers all over the house.  I have no problems with night vision or halos or astigmatism and all-in-all am very pleased.  I have tons of floaters (had these before) that I try to ignore.  Have not needed a yag (I'm keeping my fingers crossed on that one).
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi all,
I have the same question as orbitnw has - Can a monofocal IOL see distance object and computer at arm length ?

I am planning to have a cataract surgery on my left eye which has a RD surgery last year. My right eye is -1.75 and has quite a good vision (20/15). My doc expect my left eye to recover to 20/25 or better after the cataract surgery.
I am still making decision of alcon-arcysoft as I had some astigmatism or Crystalens. I just found baggyrinkle mentioned that has both eyes done for plano but his vision can cover from 20" to infinity. This makes me feel that I don't need to take the risk for Crystalens. I wear glass anyway and I have a big monitor as well.
One doc suggested me to have the left eye set at -1.5 to match my right eye. He thinks that if I put a glass near-sighted lens (-1.0), then I can see distance quite well and still have a fair intermediate vision.

Sally: Can you share with me your is the prescription of your IOL ? thanks

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Avatar_m_tn
I think the caveat with all these experiences is YMMV - your mileage may vary.  It's more important to understand the factors that affect depth of field, and to distinguish typical results from best case results.  
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Yes, I have decided to go with the Tecnis acrylic monofocal, set for distance. The only thing I have to decide if whether I want the aspheric. From what I have read you get better near vision from the non-aspheric, but better constrast from the aspheric. Which did you chose and why?
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi all,
I am in a similar situation as allmymarbles.
I also read an article mentioned that aspheric lens will have better contrast and quality with some sacrifice of the depth of field. But it also mentioned that a very good quality aspheric lens may have a good balance of both.

As I am going to lose accommodation with the mono-focal, depth of field seems to be important as well.  I just found disappointed66 and baggyrinkle messages that they can drive and read monitor (let say at distance of 25"). It seems mono-focal is not as bad as I thought. I remember both of you are using aspheric lens. Would you mind share some of your comment on the IOL you chose.
Thanks
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Avatar_f_tn
you know what, my doctor has never done a proper post op refraction, so I do not know exactly what my prescription is (they just gave me the prescription for bifocal readers...I was surprised that you do need a prescription for that even though they are only magnification).  I would like to know my proper prescription so I can make more sense of my vision, depth of field, etc, and when I do find out (perhaps when I go back to my optometrist), I will certainly post the results.  I think what I have is -.75 in one eye and -.50 in the other.  At ball games and outdoor events, I test my eyes by covering one at a time, and the more distant one lets me see more of the fine print on billboards, etc.  But w/ this nice distance vision, I do suppose I am sacrificing the computer range, because I am definitely unable to read the computer w/o my glasses.  No one has ever told me if I have large, medium, or small pupils (I will ask), but if I were to guess, I would say large.  Let us know what you decide and how it turns, because I think all of us find this fascinating and educational (even those of us who have already had our surgeries).  I wish that I had understood more of this before surgery and my doctor had discussed target prescriptions (many docs just seem to ask the patient what their hobbies are and what they do, and then decide what is best for them w/o getting into details). But having said this, I don't know that I would change a thing.

I was really scared about having surgery.  For the toric, an office emplyee was going to be marking my eye in preop.  That made me nervous, and I insisted that the surgeon do it (on the 2nd eye a few weeks later), and he did.  Both turned out fine.

Also, my anesthesia was injected.  Not the drops.  I know that Dr. K. has said that he usually uses the drops.  Again, mine turned out fine.  However, w/ the first, I had a shiner (black eye) the week following surgery.  With the second eye, after I got home and took the patch off 4 hours later as instructed, my eye was pointing off to the side like Marty Feldman, not funny.  It gradually straightened out over the next several hours. I don't think the drops would have this effect.

I have probably said too much here, I don't mean to scare anyone.  I just wish someone had told me about these things, so it wouldn't have been so freaky.  I am totally fine.  Vision is very crisp.  Surgery takes 20 minutes tops.  I highly recommend the toric (my prior astig. prescription was less than -2 for each eye).
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Avatar_m_tn
Sally:
Can you read big or header fonts in the computer with arm length distance like 28" ?
Thanks
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Avatar_f_tn
I think if both my eyes were the same iol prescription (ie both set at my closer range), then at 28' (that's pretty far from the compu), I would probably being reading the largest font (of the 3 on this forum) okay, not great.

just checked w/ a measuring stick..... I can read it from 34'.  If both eyes were the same, it would be better (because it's better when I cover the eye set to slightly more distance).

allmymarbles:  my contrast sensitivity is great w/ the acrylic aspheric!  I really like this end of the trade-off.  

Bottom Line:  it is so great to be able to make an informed decision.  we know we can't have it all (although it does sound like some of you are coming pretty close!).

  

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Avatar_m_tn
Sally,
Okay that means you can read it at 28' with the eye set to (-.75) and 34' with the eye set to (-0.5).
How big is your monitor ?
Thanks
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Avatar_f_tn
28 and 34 were supposed to say " inches ( i guess that was obvious~)

when do you think you will have surgery?   I do not want to give any wrong info since I do not know my exact refraction.

Sorry I am very not very clear in my posts.  Actually, the -.75 (or what I think is -.75) was the eye I was using for both 28 and 34 " measurements.  It's just clearer the further back I get.  

Perhaps some of the other posters can weigh in w/ their post surgery refractions.  That would be helpful ~            

My monitor is 15".

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Avatar_m_tn
Sally,
Thanks a lot for your info. I expect to see the surgeon in a month. Hopefully, I can have the surgery in 2 to 3 months.
I think you can read the computer without the glasses if you switch to a 24" monitor.
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I'm having surgery in two days.  Something I never thought to worry about (and trust me, I didn't think I had left anything unpondered) is will my eyes look different to others, aside from the fact I hopefully will not have four eyes post surgery?  In other words, can you see the lens in the eye?  I saw some photos in a cataract flier today and the lens looked creepy.
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While I cant comment on your situation since you had a RD problem. I can testify about my results and later my wife's. She had some astigmatism and went with the Alcon Acrysoft toric IOL set for distance, which corrected her astigmatism perfectly. I have a 24' monitor and can lean back in my chair and read the screen perfectly from about 2'. Close up I use a cheap pair of readers +1.0 power from about 12 inches. Since you are only doing one eye, it may be a problem balancing both eyes. My wife had minor cataract in her right eye and only the beginnings of one in the left eye. She could have waited for the left eye to "ripen", so to speak, but elected to have them both done one week apart.  Since you are only doing one eye, you may need to wear glasses afterwards to match your right eye. How long do you think before the right eye grows a cataract? They all do eventually. Having both eyes done eliminates the need for glasses other than readers. Good results all depend on the experience and skill of your surgeon. Mine does about 40 a week here in Houston.  Based on all the horror stories about premium lenses, ie Crystalens, Restor and Rezoom, I would not take a chance on screwing up my vision. Good luck and keep us posted.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks a lot for your info.
My right eye vision is pretty good and there is no cataract at this moment.The right eye has minor myopia (-1.5) and read 20/15 at distance and close with glasses. I will not touch it and I am fine with wearing glasses.
Originally my first priority is the Crystalens as I thought a mono-focal lens can function well at a limited range. I don't want to change glasses every 5 minutes to avoid straining my left eye. I am suffering a lot of eye-strain at my left eye due to weak vision induced by the cataract (a complication of the surgery)
It seems the mono-focal lenses of disappointed66 (I think she should change the userid  to goodsight101), your wife and yours can serve quite a very wide range (2ft to infinity) this is as much as a Crystalens. I am changing my mind to Acrysoft IQ.

When you read the monitor without the reader glass, how long can you read without eyestrain ? Have you try to use a light reader to read monitor ? Is there any difference ?

Thanks



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Avatar_f_tn
After having such trouble with the Restor lens.  I discuscussed with my surgeon as to the vision I would like to acheive  The left eye was seft for distance vision after the Retor was removed.  After the surgery I was able to see intermediate, close as well as distance.  He just  increase every so slightly the distance lense in the right eye..  My surgeon was the one who suggested the aspherical.  I trusted his jusdment. The right decicision was certainly made.  A good surgeon is such am important factor in making a decision.
Good Luck :)    ( Disappointed no more!)
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi Disappointed no more,
Your result (and the one from LynneAV) sounds too good to believe. Had your doctor mentioned this is just a special case for you ?
As you can see distance, intermediate and close with your mono-aspherical, there is no reason to try multi-focal. When I read the principle of the mult-focal, this sounds really unnatural to me. I don't understand how can the brain pick up the image from a lens set to different zones of focal length. If there is big bus picked in front of me, and this bus will span across all the zones of my multi-focal lens, I guess I will see the bus distorted with if I have the mult-focal lens.

BTW, just want to ask do experience eye-strain before the cataract surgery ?
Thanks
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi Taurus1203,
As someone with multifocal lens vision, maybe I can explain it to you (or confuse you further! LOL!).  The brain is a remarkable thing.  There is no difference in the vision when I go from a distance view and look down to read.  It's automatic, just as it was when I wore distance glasses (before presbyopia set in) and looked down to read.  Nothing different or wierd.  I think the brain does something to "filter" things.  Just as you don't have a "blind spot" in your vision from the space between your eyes.  The brain automatically puts it together.  It's that neuro adaptation thing.  And I do know it takes time, simply because my VA's continually improved over 6 months.  No weird vision during that time, just improving visual accuity.  So looking through my eyes, close, far, or in between, it's "normal".

I did have eyestrain the two weeks in between eye surgeries.  I work quite a bit on the computer at my work.  The operated eye kept improving for reading during the two weeks, and I only had a monofocal distance contact in the other eye.  By the end of the two weeks, I could only work on the computer for about 10 minutes at a time, then had to walk away as I'd get a headache.  Distance vision didn't bother me, but the intermediate and reading did big time just before the second eye surgery.

I don't think I would have done well with monovision.  I don't do well with any imbalance in my vision... I couldn't even walk straight when I tried bifocals once ;)

Did that help?
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You say your good eye is -1.5 and 20/15 distance and you need a small power reader for it?  I take it you do not currently need correction for it now. Which means that the bad eye will be set for distance to match your good eye? Do you have any astigmatism now, which may require a toric lens? The eyes should be balanced as I understand it. Both implants in my case are the same. Acrysoft SN60WF  Aspherhic 18.0 D power, 13.0mm L and 6.0mm Optic. ( I think most all monofocal IOL's are now aspheric). Before my surgery my right eye was completely blurred by the cataract and I had a minor cataract in my left eye. Like you I was reluctant to have anything done to it. But, after the right eye came out so good I felt,  why not fix the good one now rather than wait. My Dr. agreed and stated that best results occur when both eyes are done at the same time.  Another factor which effected my vision the most was glare caused by the cataracts. I had a lot of eye strain before, because of the unbalanced eyes. In your case, once you fix your bad eye both eyes should be the same.  The only time I use my readers at the monitor is when I'm up close typing from about 15". While I really don't need them in that case, it just makes it easier.  But, kicked back in my chair I can read the screen all day without eye strain.  I know all this is subjective and may be different for others.  I have a Kindle eReader and can set the font to where I never need readers to use it. Especially, outside in the bright sun, I don't even have to take my sunglasses off. I find that reading a newspaper requires my 1.5 readers. And I also need the readers for menus in dark restaurants .  The most important factor obtaining a good outcome is the pre op testing and measurements, and the skill of your Dr. I can't stress that enough! Judging from most of the sad stories here on the forum the pre op measurements and skills required seem to be lacking in those cases. You better live in a big city with top named surgeons and the very latest high tech machines! Good luck.
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My wife and I both had ours done, and have had people comment on how clear and sparkling our eyes appeared. Yes, they will improve your look! Your eyes will look young again. And, no more red eye in photos, instead they come out sparkly white.
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Avatar_n_tn
I never thought about the red eye.... that's a cool perk!  Camera's now a days have red eye reduction, but it doesn't stop it all together.  Thanks!  No more "red eye paranoia" when I get my picture taken!
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks for your explanation. I think I understand your point. But I am thinking is everybody's brain can adapt to the new mechanism introduced by this lens or someone may take longer time.
In some of your previous posts, you mentioned your vision is 20/200. I think you meant the vision without glasses. Correct ?
After the surgery of your first eye, which eye did you rely on to see or read during that 2 weeks ? Does your headache induced by the imbalance of vision ?

thanks

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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks a lot for your info.
I don't have much presbyopia on my right eye. With the same glass (-1.5), I can read 20/15 for distance and small print (J2). My right eye can read J1 after taking out the glasses.

I plan to set my left eye the same myopia to the right to make it balance and correct astigmatism with toric. Then I can wear a glasses with 2 lens the same or very close.

My left eye has a myopia -4.5 and version is 20/50 due to the cataract. This is side effect of the RD surgery. I experience eye strain and sometime even headache. I also have light sensitivity. I asked my eye doc and the surgeon and they just thought that I paid too much attention to my eye. They advise me to be relax and take a break after reading the computer for 20 min and the eye strain will be much less. I got some 2nd and 3rd opinion from other eye docs. They think that taking a break and keep relax would help but cannot solve the problem. They think that my root cause should be the difference of myopia being more than 2 diopter and big gap in vision of 2 eyes. After reading stories from you guys, I am more convinced that the cause of my light sensitivity, eye strain and headache should be a direct or indirect side effect of my cataract.

Thanks
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi taurus1203,
Not sure if everyone adapts, or adapts at the same rate.  I know I was always pretty good at those covergence/divergence things.  I also practiced them awhile after my surgery.  It's on this site... about 3/4 down the web page.  http://www.eyecanlearn.com/  Not sure if it helped, or I just naturally adapted.  An example also is some people can tolorate the monovision or mini-monovision well, and others can't.  Why don't some adapt?

I was 20/200 before my surgery without glasses.  With glasses it was 20/20 and I could read with them on until presbyopia set in.  Then I had to take them off to read.  I think I relied more on my restor eye in the time between surgeries for computer work and reading, as I remember closing the unoperated eye sometimes to alieviate the eyestrain sometimes while working.  I wore my husband's readers in between that time for the newspaper at home which helped. Distance wasn't a problem, since the temporary contact was a distance lens.  I tried popping a lens out of an old pair of glasses for late night TV after removing the contact, but that didn't work at all.  I had double vision with that method.  I was glad it was only two weeks between.... I got along ok, but it wasn't optimal.  I haven't touched a pair of glasses now since that time between surgeries.

I agree that gap in your visual accuity is causing some problems.  2 diopeters is a lot, and I wonder if it has something to do also with correction by IOL in one eye, and correction by glasses in the other.....  Better I think both eyes corrected with the same method, and not to far apart in accuity.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi,
Do you mean you can use your operated eye immediately after the surgery ?
If you don't close one of them, which eye do you have strain ? Or both.
Did you get headache from this eye strain ?

I actually have 3 diopter difference between my 2 eyes. I plan to  set the my left to be (-1.5) which is the same as my right one. Then I  will wear glasses as I don't mind.
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Avatar_n_tn
Yes, my eye (although not perfect) was way better than it was without glasses before surgery.  I rested awhile, and when I went back in the afternoon for re-check, the eye was 20/40, and then he popped the contact I could have into the other eye.  I wore sunglasses on the way home, but I was taking in as much of the scenery as I could!

The eyestrain would get like I just couldn't focus.  I would blink a lot and try to bring things into focus.  Then it would cause a headache from not being able to.  That's when I'd get up and walk away for a bit.

eye strain was in non-operated eye.  No problems now.  It's like I never had vision problems.... that my bad vision I had had since I was 7 was just a bad dream....
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757137_tn?1347200053
Many thanks for all your help. I guess the only question not answered is which brand of lens  you chose. I was thinking of getting the Tecnis, but if there is one better, or just as good, that would be good to know. Some surgeons have a preference, so an alternative may be necessary.
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Avatar_n_tn
My eyes before my recent surgery were quite different, one much stronger than the other. The surgery was on the weaker eye with the other to follow soon. I received an Acrysoft monofocal IOL set for distance. I'm told I have some astigmatism that was not there before surgery. Before I needed glasses for distance but read and used the computer without them. Now I have 20/30 in the operated eye and cannot read with it unless the print is very, very large. My vision in that eye is blurry at any distance, but I can drive with it, yet not read with it.
Now I am wondering whether it put off the second surgery. I spend a lot of time reading and in other close work and am concerned that I may end up needing bifocals or even 2 pairs of glasses. Even with the mild cataract in the unoperated eye, I can use it to read without significant strain.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi album,
If you've had a monofocal lens put in one eye already, I think the only option is monovision, or minimonovision if you want to get by without glasses after having the second eye done.  But you might need glasses for some very fine tasks, or for times you need absoultely clear distance vision.  I don't think they can put a multifocal lens in a second eye after the first eye was done with a monofocal.  I'm certainly no expert though.......  Sounds like you had monovision before your surgery so maybe that would be right for you.....
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Avatar_n_tn
Old thread here, but pertinent for me.  Seven days ago I had a left cataract extraction wtih monofocal lens implant at age 54.  I was a high myope, -7.5.   The doctor said I had some astigmatism and I was willing to pay the extra for a toric lens, but after additional readings the doctor said he could do the correction with a monofocal lens.

Even before the cataracts the world at a distance was a blur for me without glasses. The cataract grew quickly so that my vision with glasses couldn't be corrected better than 20/50.  Seven days out from the surgery with the monofocal lens set to correct for distance, I have 20/30 distance vision in my left eye without glasses.  I had forgotten how beautiful the world is!  To me, the detail is exquisite, amazing.  It's a rebirth of perception.

That said, there is a distressing downside.  I read all the time at work and at home.  I wore glasses to read (presbyopia starting in the late 40's) but could read with some small strain without glasses.  Now the printed page of a book is a complete blur with the left eye.  I can read on the computer if I magnify (zoom) to 150-200 and sit back a few feet.  This is a complete reversal of how I've lived most of my life.  I feel like Burgess Meredith in that Twilight Episode, the last man on earth happily surrounded by a mountain of books who then breaks his eyeglasses and can't read.

That said, I wouldn't change the way the monofocal cataract was set for distance vision.  I'll just be sure to keep a large stock of reading glasses on hand.  

Tomorrow I have cataract extraction in the right eye, and this time a toric lens will be implanted in the hopes that I can achieve unaided distance vision in the right as good as the left.  The right eye does have a higher degree of astigmatism.  From what I've read here, the toric lens does have a greater chance of suffering from complications. But I will take the chance to be able to walk along the beach without glasses, to actually see the waves on the horizon without foggy lenses.  Due to allergies and dry eye I've never tried to wear contact lenses.

As Miranda said in The Tempest when she "saw" others for the first time:

O wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world
That has such people in't!  
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Avatar_m_tn
Hello, I too am reading this old thread and found it helpful.. Am post vitrectomy patient who has developing cataract and am doing my homework.

Would you please share your results with us please?
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Every sort of bad result from cataract surgery can be found on the internet, but in my real life I know not a single person who is unhappy with his or her results. I think I can say truthfully that everybody I know, or else their mother and/or father, has had cataract surgery, and I don't know of a single bad result. Everybody I know received standard monofocal IOLs (usually what Medicare covers) and nobody did any personal research prior to just showing up and letting the doctor do his thing. Frankly, I am sorry I researched so much, because it put me in a state of unnecessary worry.

My personal experience was wonderful. For the first time in my entire life, I can function -- including driving -- without glasses. I now wear progressive lens glasses without correction on top a lot of the time because reading glasses annoyed me and I wearied of putting them on and off and losing them and toting them around.  But I only really need them for reading, and find them easy on my eyes for computer work without straining because of the slight correction for middle distance possible with progressive lenses. I wish I could have had this operation when I was 2 years old.
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Thanks for your response, and I am so happy you had great results.
I too am doing my "homework" and probably (?) have too much knowledge about this procedure and complications, however I had a Vitrectomy 6 ,months ago.  Prior Vitrectomies pose additional risk with the Cataract surgery, so I am of the opinion that I would rather be over-informed than under-informed and have regrets if I select the wrong Surgeon.
Some things cannot be controlled, and I understand that.  I just have to know for myself that I did the best I could.
Anyways, I am hoping for good results like you.  Best of luck in the future, and thanks again for sharing your experience.
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I was wondering how well the progressive lens glasses have worked for very close distances. For example, if you need to see something close up in the mirror, or need to read fine print, can you do so or is a separate magnifier required?  If close vision isn't good with the glasses, about how close can you get before vision becomes blurry again? Thanks.
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i had Cataract Surgery bit over week ago with a lense added, i cant see close or far with good focus of any kind. now im worried about getting my other eye done.. i am having a hard time to see this as i type.wil my eye get any better as  time heals?i do not turst all surgeones.. some say u can see clear  pretty good after surgery, they are pretty lucky if so.


Mr Angel
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Dear Friends,
I had cataract removal for both eyes on May 28, 2012 and June 4,2012. My vision has improved significantly and at 62, I feel that I am looking at things in real colours and splendours. I have similar experience as described.
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If I had to do it all over again, I believe I would have opted for a medium distance monofocal IOL instead of long distance.

Why? Because I see absolutely nothing clearly from inches to 6 feet without "readers". I was so used to being able to take off my glasses, do fine work up close, and read without glasses. My work and hobbies all require close work. Now, it's a struggle to find anything to use that works for both reading, detail work and also seeing the computer screen. I have 4 - count them 4 - different pairs of readers" that I'm constantly changing out for different tasks. Bifocals are useless due to the fixed focal length of each lenses, and progressives don't seem to cover all of the close in focal ranges with enough width in the progression. I tell people that I can see two gnats making love on the back of a bird 200 feet away, but can't recognize a face sitting across from me. Exaggeration, of course, but it's frustrating. I was not a candidate for multifocal lenses, so I cannot comment on them.

Having zero focus of accommodation at any distance was something I was unprepared for. I thought that at least there would be some range of natural accommodation, although very limited.

Having said all that, the ability to feel safe driving again (reading street signs - judging distance - headlight glare), seeing true colors again, and not being blind at the pool without my glasses is truly marvelous. I just think that for me, I could have made a different choice. It's well worth checking out options well ahead of time. I didn't do enough homework. I knew that a monofocal would be better for me than a multifocal and went from there.

I had inquired about the accommodating IOLs as well, but my practice stopped using them entirely, due to patient feedback and problems. They do use multifocals with select patients.
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Hi,
glad to read about this. Can you please tell us, which kind/brad IOL did you get?
I am planning my Ctaract removal in next weeks...
Thanks
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From this thread I can tell, that where you want your focus is an important consideration.  Because I'm quite nearsighted, I'm used to reading small print easily,  and even books by just getting close.

My surgeon post op is looking for me to be no longer near sighted, so  reading glasses will be my constant companions. Ick.

He would like me to consider a  toric lens -- an upgrade not covered by insurance -- after cataract removal for great vision unaided ... except of course for those readers.  Years ago, I wore contacts constantly and had to read boat plans which are TOUGH, so I resorted to a magnifier. I realized without contact lenses reading the tiny blurred type would have been  easy.

BTW, the vision in my non-dominant eye is messed up, so two-lens solutions for seeing at a range of distances won't work in my case. Drat.
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If I could do it all over again, my decision would be to try for intermediate and close for reading.  I would not mind wearing glasses for driving.
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I have read all this and still cant decide on just a simple question---do I choose to be set for nearsighted or far sighted? I am pretty bad either way at present and will be having one eye done with a lensd to correct astigmatism in one week from now. The other eye has a small cataract butm Im going to wait.
If I set for far sighted---it sounds likeI may need many different glasses for close ups. If I set for near sighted, I think Id only need one pair for driving, etc. Im now afraid that I will have ne focus at all after doing this. At present my vision in the one eye is so blurred that I cant drive with it so at least that will be better, right?
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Sorry about the delay in responding, but my implants were Bausch & Lomb LI61AO aspherical lenses.

One further thought regarding the long/intermediate/short thing.....

If you opt for long distance vision, and you lose or break your glasses, you can always get some cheap "readers" at any drug or variety store to get by with, but you can't do the same if you are fixed at short distances.

I don't think there is a truly clear answer. All I know is, I was used to taking off my glasses and seeing extremely fine detail, but that is now lost.

On the other hand, it's nice being able to not wear glasses at the pool, or walking, or other activities like that.

I spend most of my day at work on a computer, so short to intermediate would have been great for that.

I will be getting progressive lenses and try to stop agonizing over the decision I made. I've worn glasses since I was 6, so no big deal.

And yes, the clarity to be able to drive safely again makes it well worth doing, whatever you decide. The prime reason for the cataract surgery is NOT to eliminate totally the need for glasses, but to get that clarity back - with or without additional correction.

You will also be amazed at how your color perception will change.
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Hi Trapper,
I always discuss the "3 Visions" with my patients (Distance, Intermediate and Near) and I specifically discuss "which activities do you perform without glasses." These are very important and most cataract surgeons who are also refractive surgeons are well versed in this discussion. I am personally a big fan of blended vision: dominant eye for distance and non dominant eye for intermediate (-1.25 D = 32"). This gives a range of focus without the full need for glasses. I hope this helps.
Sincerely,
Timothy D. McGarity, M.D.
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Thank you Dr. McGarity.

Let me also qualify my statements regarding choices, in case it helps others. I have other eye problems that would preclude either multifocal or using alternate focal lenses in the individual eyes. Either approach might not be good for those with retinal problems, or visual field defects. I now realize why these approaches were never mentioned to me as choices, but the practice does offer them. I think my Dr. believed I already knew they would not be approprite for me, hence we spent no time talking about them

As you state, the professional who knows the status of your eyes would/should thoroughly discuss this with you in order for you to make the best decision. With multiple eye problems, the choices may be limited.

I remember talking to someone shortly after my surgery who was raving about her accommodating IOLs, and I got briefly disturbed that they were not offered as a choice to me. A few minutes of "googling" and a followup conversation with the practice quickly squelched my concerns.

For those of you who can take full advantage of the great technology available, go for it . . . . . . . . ..
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I am 43 and just had left IOL toric lens replacement about 6 weeks ago. And liike you, I can see super far but at 5-6ft and beyond. My right eye has a cataract but it is no where near needing surgery. I don't need to see that far away. I did virtually no homework and am very sorry I didn't. I used to wear bifocals and now because the vision is good in the left and so bad in the right I can not wear glasses. I have to have a contact for the right eye. My vision was so poor to begin with that finding a contact was virtually impossible. I have to wear so many different readers depending on what im doing. And since both eyes are so different they both kind of compete with each other and my eyes feel like they are crossing.
I have been to 3 different doctors and they just cant seem to get the eyes close to seeing the same thing. They say I may not need the other lens replaced for years.
The actualy surgery and lens replacement was fine. I just wished my vision wasn't set to see so far away. And waiting to get the right eye done is so frustruating. Just not sure what to do in the mean time. And what happens on the day I can't wear the contact for some reason? I just about can't do anything.
Just do your homework as others have stated. I am miserable in this in between time.
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Hi,

I hope someone who's had mini-monovision done will be willing to comment on the following concerns because I plan on  IOLs after cataract removal soon, probably mini-monovision. I have a very reputable ophthalmologist who is also recommended by my retina specialist, and many friends have been happy with their results from this cataract surgeon (but none of them know exactly what they had done)

I also suffer from severe dry eye & eye allergies (undoubtedly exacerbated by the dryness).  Right now, it's controlled to just-tolerable levels with Restasis, antihistamines (oral & drops) & multiple types of artificial tears, & I just learned about one other non-prescription option from one of Dr. Hagan's blogs that I've ordered to try.  I've worn glasses since about age 14, so I don't mind doing so post-op.  However, if I have one eye set for intermediate and one for distance, then I'm worried that I won't be able to check my eyes closely enough:  for filaments, redness, stray hairs, etc., not to mention apply eye drops inside or ointment to the margins to control chronic blephariiis  --  all of which seem virtually impossible while wearing eyeglasses.

BTW, I can't risk a trial of full-monovision, because even before my eyes were this dry (i.e., 30 yrs ago) I wore contacts and had to give them up due to dry eye & multiple related symptoms, and my work relies on decent vision.

Can those of you who have had mini-monovision done (i.e., IOLs for both eyes already) please comment on how well you are able to examine your own eyes or apply eye ointment to the lid margins,  If you do comment, please indicate what type of mini-monovision you had done, if you know.  Thank you!!
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I was near-sighted before cataract surgery.Now My dominant left eye has 20/30 vision with the IOL . So for 9 months I have been seeing distance  and near--and my midrange is pretty good because I have been able to use the computer. This seems like a good deal so I am considering monovision-- having my right eye done with  an IOL for near vision.  My doctor I would see the way I see now.

II'm informed that  with monovision there is some loss of peripheral vision
as well as depth ( I won't be able to watch a 3-D movie) . I don't drive very often and when I do  I don't  seem to have a problem, but  I am concerned about night driving, so I wonder if I could wear glasses that would correct both these problems .  I would appreciate hearing from anyone with monovision after cataract surgery as soon as possible  to know what your experience has been.  I am due for surgery very soon.  Thanks
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Can your wife see well enought to put on eye make-up??
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Hi Lynn,
I only 33 years old and trying to decide between getting a regular lens or the restor multi-focal.
I'm wondering if you would see well enought to read a text or put on eye make-up... things like that without glasses?
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I have similar issues as you.  My right eye was set for distance and my left for close.  Before, I was able to see very well at close range so I always took my glasses off to see close.  I needed glasses for distance.  Now, I was told that the Retina receives two images and the brain selects the appropriate one.. however, my brain refuses to do that and the result is that I can't see close or far!  Both are a blur.  If I cover either eye, I can see perfect, but with both eyes open, is a blur. I'm 72 and my Dr. says this doesn't help and that I need time etc. But after three weeks of the last surgery in my right eye, nothing has changed. I'm really frustrated because I can't see!  I opted to cover one eye and walk around looking like a "pirate"
but that was just to test each eye separately.  Obviously, I cannot "solve" the problem doing this.  I had the Standard Monofocal IOL lenses implanted.  Thanks for any suggestions. Helen
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I have a similar situation, though only 58.  I had one eye only with cataract due to Vitrectomy SX.  That eye came out with the IOL at approx. -.50=a little near sighted.  My good eye is +1=farsighted.  At first the eyes fought each other and did not fuse the 2 images well.
After several months of slow improvement, I am to a place where my brain does a pretty good job at it and I can live with the results. Wear glasses for computer and a different pair for reading.
My advice is to give it a few months if you can, and really try hard to take your mind off of your vision.  Let your brain do it's neuro-adaptation to your new eyesight.  The brain is an amazing organ that can adapt to most changes, but it takes time.
Good luck to you.  
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Hi, you really have a good result in explanting the iol. May I know what is the doctor's name?
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I'm similar to yourself!
I'm 67 and I've recently had cataracts removed from both eyes and toric lens inserted. I had severe miopia and astigmatism and also have Fuchs Dystrophy. I decided to go ahead with the operation because I was on the borderline for driving. I was struggling to read road signs and to recognise faces from a distance but could read and use my PC (I work in IT) without ,spectacles. I went to a reputable private Eye Clinic via my work health insurance although had to pay for the upgrade to toric lenses. I used a consultant with a good reputation and when I was examined, he told me that he belived I would be O.K. without any surgery for the Dystrophy. I had the operations with a 4 week gap between each eye. Both operations were totally painless and the consultant told me  they were clinically perfect. My eyes have been checked and I'm told that the Dystrophy has not deteriorated because of the operation and the new lenses are in the perfect position. The consultant gave me the choice of long or close vision and I chose to improve the long range vision and to get spectacles for reading and PC work. The consultant was very optimistic that i would have good long-range vision and that most - but not all - of my astigmatism could be removed. Sadly, although it's now 8 weeks since the first eye was done and 4 weeks since the second eye was done, I cannot see clearly either for reading, using the PC or at long distance. The right eye seems to be improved re the astigmatism but the left eye does not. The eyes definitely have different focal lengths and I'm getting floaters on a daily basis from the left eye, although not severely. The consultant has told me to continue putting in eye drops for another month before I go back to see him again. After the first eye was done I had an eye test at the hospital and with the addition of lenses found I got good vision. Hopefully, it will be better than what I had previouly with spectacles but it's still pretty disappointing!
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I just recently had cataract surgery done. I am  56 yr old female with dry macular degeneration in both eyes, and I have fuchs heterochromic iridocyclitis and glaucoma with an ahmed valve in my left eye. I have been near sighted all my life so was accustomed to taking my glasses off to read and do computer work. Since the cataract surgery which has given me 20/20 distance vision it has really messed up the rest. I can not even see without cheater aka reader glasses to cook with as I have no focus in the intermediate range.
There was never once any discussion on the lens type and the pros and cons of which way to go. I am very disappointed.
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From everything I have read I would stay away from the multi focal lens as there are many problems.
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I also forget to mention both my lens are Abbott's AR40e with a 17.5 diopter.
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I'm really surprised your doctor didn't discuss doing mini-monovision with your monofocals...then you would have been able to do mid  and most close activities without readers including things like computer or cooking (only needing them for extended reading)...although your distance would not be quite "razor" sharp: but very good nonetheless...that is what i had... i am "readers free" like 95% of the time...
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Hi,

I had Refractive Lens Exchange (or Clear Lens Exchange) beginning of December 2012 in both eyes (one week apart). I have LENTIS Mplus lenses in both eyes (multifocal lenses).

I was 44 years old when I had my surgery.  I was very longsighted and my vision was getting worse and worse before the surgery (in 6 months time it went from +5.75 to +6.25 in one eye).  

After the surgery I had dry eyes (my eyes were always tiny bit dry) though I panicked that something else was wrong - retinal detachment, glaucoma,...name it...I was paranoid that I had all of those.  The other thing which I noticed a little bit later was slight ghosting but that is only when I spend time in front of laptop screen or TV and eyes get tired.  I also can see in my right eye small tiny floaters, though I only started seeing them after someone mentioned those.

My night vision is okay though sometimes when I think too much about it, it can be annoying.... unless something else distracts my mind.  Though, on a bad day, inside every shop it looks like a disco.

Those are 'bad' things.  I use Clinitas Hydrate for my dry eyes and it helps.  From using it 6-8 times a day I now use it once or twice.  Ghosting is still there but my brain is getting used to it.  Floaters are there but they are only there when I think of them.  Halos etc...well, I always had them so they might be there but in slightly different shape.

And my vision????

PERFECT!

I wore glasses since the age of 3 when I contracted measles and due to high temperature my optical nerve weakened.  My sight got really bad though it got better over the age.  However, since my twenties I am wearing glasses and prescription was getting slightly bigger and bigger until last few year became really bad.

My left eye is now between +0.25 and +0.50.  My right eye is between +0.50 and +0.75.  I didn't wear glasses since I had surgery apart from couple of times my colleagues reading glasses when I tested the reading of the small print from some distance.  I have slight astigmatism since ever so that might be the reason for the slight ghosting in vision.

My vision is - left eye 20/15 and right eye 20/20 (though right eye sometimes does better).  

I visited more than one surgeon and optometrist to get the second, third and fourth opinion (we all love our eyes, don't we?).  They were all impressed with results, in particular with positioning of lenses, and they did thourough tests on my eyes.  My prescription didn't change since January (it takes some time for prescription to settle).  I know I might have to visit my surgeon for YAG laser of posterior capsulotomy. I was told about potential YAG so no problem there.

So....would I chose multifocals again?  YES.  

The ones I have are great.  I have no problem with the vision.  I had a problem how to adapt with new vision, what someone said here 'it is also in your brain/head'.  I see things I never could before without my glasses.  Eyes are also looking healthy with few bloodshots but that is due smoking in the past, computer use, exercise.

All eyes are different.  Some adapt to multifocals, some don't.  Some adapt to monofocals, some don't.  That is why you need to get a proper consultation with your surgeon who should explain to you all risks in details, including the side effects.  Also, you need to understand that your brain needs to work with your eyes.  Don't just expect 20 minute miracle.

Once you know what to expect - go ahead!  It will change your life for ever.  
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Greetings, I am a 57 year old male who has to undergo Cataract Surgery. I have very poor vision in my left eye that is basically non-correctable from an undetected case of  lazy eye when I was a kid. In my right eye with my progressive lenses I enjoyed good vision until the cloudiness of the cataract set in. Unfortunately that is the eye with the worst cataract although I have them in both eyes. I also have a touch of astigmatism and have been on lumigan for 3 years because of high IOP but that is now greatly controlled with the drops and my IOP is normal.

I am set to have my good eye operated on next week and am scared to death having only one good eye. I was all set to do multifocal because of all the benefits (marketing I read) but in my pre-op yesterday my doctor ruled that out. He shared some of what is on this thread about the complications plus other individual factors that make me not a good candidate. He is also uncertain based on my measurements if I am a good candidate for a toric lens. My eyes were pretty dry from the nightly lumigan so the measurements were kind of iffy and m doc wants to redo them after stop using the lumigan plus some lubricant drops for a few days and go back a couple of days before the surgery to get the measurements done again.

So.. now that I now I have to go with monofocal I am confused about how to have my distance set. Near, intermediate or distant. I live on a computer for my day job in healthcare technology. As I have worn glasses and until the lumigan used to wear contacts all the time, I am excited about the potential of no more glasses for normal activities and have no problem wear reading glasses for the close up as my eye doctor shared would be the case.

I want to make an informed choice. I have a highly skilled doc who has been doing this for 30 years and did both of my parents with great results.. so I have a lot of trust there.. Don't want to over think this but any advice before the surgery would be a big help!

Suggestions?? Thoughts?? Comments... MANY THANKS!
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I like the ability to see  computer, read a book as well as a small print newspaper/magazine in good lighting, and seeing well enough intermediate that I can get my without glasses. Keep pair o driving glasses in the car; keep a pair of reading glasses in living room, , and flashlight and magnifying glass in kitchen for package instructions and incredibly small print on electronics.
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I have lousy vision after implants. One eye now requires a +2 diopter prescription lens. The other implant must be overpowered, as I see nothing clear out to about 6 feet. Absolutely horrible depth of field. I was told this was all within the margin of error, as I was very miopic and the shape of the eye was the cause. I don't know what to believe, but it's made a real problem with getting glasses that will fix the problem. I can't get by with "readers", as both eyes are so different, and I cannot see clearly out to 6 feet without lenses.

Bah humbug.
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Oh, these were aspheric monofocal lenses.

If I had to do it over again, knowing I would still need major glasses after surgery, I think I would opt for an intermediate distance focal point so I could clearly see for most things without glasses (like faces, the TV and computer), and fairly equal degradation at both distance and close up. Progressive lenses would probably be easier to make for that type of eye, but that's pure speculation on my part.

I've never gotten a satisfactory explanation of why the two eyes came out so different. There's a lot more to the story regarding my eye woes, and the eye that requires the +2 diopter correction had an epiretinal membrane - since removed, but the retinal surgeon did not think that should have made the initial calculation that far off.
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What was it you and your doctor were aiming for  in each eye.  You have already had both eyes done?
On the one eye I had done, my surgeon was nice enough to admit he had done one of the measurements wrong.  He said he could do lasik adjustment but I declined. Because everything was blurry no matter what glasses or contacts I tried, an epiretinal membrane was removed and now images are clear.  I have very limited depth of field but can read and use computer. .  So sorry you are having an unsatisfactory outcome.  Hang in there and keep trying to find answers..
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Thanks.

I'm about to write an epic ranting post regarding what led up my current problems, in hopes that both the docs on this forum will take it to heart, and also hope patients can learn from the mistakes and how to take charge of their own care.

Rule #1 - don't trust what you've been told - independently seek out information and other opinions.

For example, lens implants can be quite amazing for restoring cloudy, discolored vision, but temper your expectations and ignore the marketing hype. Pay attention to the little "gotchas".
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I certainly  agree that you should learn all you can before cataract surgery. Also you should choose a surgeon who will explain all your options to you and explain his advice for you. I knew very little before my surgery, and my doctor listened to my comments about eye strain and simply said, "Let's do it."
I got no explanation about the loss of flexibility in my vision I would experience. My vision was set for distance in the operated eye, and I am glad the cataract in the other eye remains mild because I can still see well with it for reading. For reading captions on tv, I wear glasses; the correction is not very good, but I can do everything I need to: drive, read, and do housework, etc. I couldn't play tennis, but I wasn't doing it anyway.
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Had cataract surgery with ACRY Sof IQ IOL by Alcon implanted in my bad right eye on 1/23/012, 20/20 vision post surgery, with no issue, a year later same surgeon said he can easily take care of the secondary cataract in my right eye, with laser surgery in his office, now 19 months later, I am deliberating the pros and cons of YAG laser capsulotomy, and found this in depth article by New York Times about cataract surgery, if it was available two years ago, at the time when I was researching before my cataract surgery, I'd make sure requesting the best IOL and to triple check and remove all debris to avoid POC (Posterior Capsule Opacity) from my VERY reputable surgeon.

http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/cataract/print.html

I'd NOT elected to have my cataract surgery if it's 3 out 4 possibility to have secondary cataract as stated in this following link, plus, from all I read online so far, it's at least 10 times the risk of cataract surgery for YAG laser, NOT 1/100th as stated in this link " A YAG laser capsulotomy is a surgical procedure, however, the risks of a serious complication resulting from this procedure are about 1/100th of the risks associated with a regular cataract operation." -
http://www.prk.com/cataracts/yag_laser.html

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3 people (including myself) had IOL implants within a year or so of each other and with several diferent surgeons. I can thus say by experience, and from anecdotal evidence that the following "hypes" are not true.

1. You will most likely be able to get by with cheap pairs of reader glasses for small print.

Not even remotely true in our cases. All of us need prescription glasses - some quite complex -  for daily activities. Granted, more comes into play, like astigmatism, in determining the need for glasses, but the hype might lead you to believe otherwise. One did not need prescription lenses for a while, but now does, which leads to . . .

2. If you do need glasses, you will not have to change your prescription to get new glasses very often, if at all.

All of us have gone through several prescription changes since healing from the IOL implants.

3. You will have some limited focus of accommodation, so medium and long distance vision will be adequate with a monofocal IOL set for distance.

Only one of the three can say they see fine at medium and long distances and note that their eyes seem to focus by themselves slightly. In my case nothing is truly clear (in my one plano eye) out to about 6 feet.

4. There is a slight chance you will develop a PCO months to a year or so following surgery that can be taken care of with a safe YAG procedure.

All but one have had PCOs in one or both eyes removed by YAG. One has PCO in both eyes, but not bad enough yet to risk surgery. One developed bad floaters following PCO. YAG surgery can lead to floaters, increased IOP (glaucoma) and retinal problems, so it's not as safe as hyped.

5. Limbal relaxing incisions can be done at the same time as the IOL implant that will correct your astigmatism.

One had it in one eye, and the astigmatism became worse.


I have talked with others, other than we three, who have similar experiences,so we are not unique.

Please don't get me wrong. Modern cataract lens replacement is a marvelous, sight saving/improving thing, but just be aware of he realities.
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How much your vision improved post YAG?   What's the percentage of problems post YAG from all the people you know?  I truly regret having my cataract surgery 19.5 months ago, and worry about making another mistake for my impending YAG.  Thank you for sharing your experience!
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I have not yet had the YAG. Others in this group have, and saw a big improvement. One experienced additional fioaters, but says they gradually diminished.

My PCO causes loss of detail and some reduction (about 2 lines) of acuity.

I'm waiting - this is my only good eye left.
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By the way, Dr. Hagen has a post somewhere with a good description of what should be expected, distance wise, from near, medium and far IOL implants. I'll try to find it.
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Thank you for your info!  TrapperV, So glad the vision improvement post YAG of your group, I'm more confident to under go YAG in November now.

I've read Dr. Hagan's most informative report on Cataract surgery, I most likely would wait till my Cataract affects my vision then consider surgery, if that report was available two years ago.
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Avatar_m_tn
I have found this thread extremely useful and want to post my own experience.

I had cataract surgery in my right eye 7 weeks ago and in my left eye a little over 3 weeks ago. I got new progressive lens eyeglasses yesterday.

The broad points:  I have been extremely nearsighted since I started wearing glasses at age 13. I chose to have monofocal lenses (Alcon AcrySof IQ SN60WF) set for intermediate. With my new glasses I have excellent vision at all distances. Without glasses, I have excellent vision for reading and computer/desk work. (Vision from 1 to 2 feet is perfect) My distance vision is better than it has ever been without glasses. I could not pass an eye test for driving, but I can read a license plate at ten yards in daylight. The picture on my 55" TV is blurry from 10 feet, but I can read the onscreen program guide.

Here are the details: My eyeglass prescription before surgery was -7.50 in the right eye with astigmatism of +1.50 and -6.00 in the left eye with astigmatism of +1.00. My surgeon targeted -1.50 in both eyes as a goal for my surgery. The result of surgery in my left eye was -2.00 with +0.50 of astigmatism, and the result in my right eye was -1.75 with +0.25 of astigmatism.

The letters were blurry, but without eyeglasses I was able to read the 20/50 line with my left eye and the 20/70 line with my right eye. (I recognize that this result is not consistent with the prescription for my new glasses).

I was surprised that the surgery greatly reduced my astigmatism even though I did not have any specific surgery for astigmatism (LRI). I read somewhere that the placement of the incision for cataract surgery could somewhat correct astigmatism. This seems to have been the result in my case.

I also had ECP surgery to address my glaucoma. My pressure test a couple of days ago showed pressures of 13 and 11. I no longer have to use glaucoma eye drops.

Bottom line is that I found this surgery to be miraculous. One will certainly second guess their lens choice. I certainly have. I enjoy the ability to read and use my computer without glasses. I am happy with that choice. I expect that if I had chosen distance lenses, I would have enjoyed their benefits as well.

Chances are almost certain that cataract surgery will greatly improve your vision. Don't let second guessing your choices ruin your enjoyment of that improvement.
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Avatar_m_tn
I should also add that I do have diagonal light streaks when I look at street or car lights at night. My surgeon thought this was due to astigmatism and the streaks would disappear when I got glasses. They did not. The streaks are certainly liveable, but I will mention them to him when I have my next examination in 3 months.
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Avatar_m_tn
I think your Doctor has done best for you by setting for 10 and 6 feet. I think it is best Optics wise. Do you also use glasses for far distance beyond 10 feet or for driving?

My doctor has set my left eye for far distance vision during cataract surgery. Now I am in fix for my right eye.
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Avatar_m_tn
Lucky you are because your Surgeon gave you best advice for setting both eye for Intermediate and you can work on computer without glasses. (I am not so luck as I am set for far-distance in left operated eye).
Are there any updates on "diagonal light streaks when I look at street or car lights at night" issue you have met the doctor. Has the streak disappeared over time or you learnt to live with it? Is the streak in both eyes or only one eye?
I have same diagonal light streaks problem on my recently operated eye and wanted to know if it goes away with time. My surgeon said that these are optical aberrations and should lessen with time.
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Avatar_m_tn
I second whatever is described here. Though surgery is marvel, there is a lot of hype around it....
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi,
I suffer from exactly the same situation. I was strongly myopic and wore glasses since I was 15 years of age. But was very comfortable with close distance and could read very very fine prints after removing glasses and bringing object very close to eye.. Now After surgery I can see far-distance very very clear, but up close I can see nothing. Need spectacles to search spectacles, so to say. I feel surgeon should have corrected me for near-distance, but no such option was explained by surgeon. Also I never wore + dipoter in my life, so wearing +ve D glasses gives lense-ing effect, very uncomfortable and not used to.


My advice to future candidates for cataract surgery is to demand from doctors the explanation of "optics" option available and pros and cons. Optics is equally or more important.
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Avatar_m_tn
Certainly...

Future cataract candidates should request surgeons to explains all the "optics" option available - which vision to set to zero, near or far or intermediate,  and pros and cons. Optics is equally or more important. Surgeon seem to have perfected cataract procedure, not enough focus on Optics.
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Avatar_m_tn
Husband had cataract in one eye removed. Vision okay in that eye. Surgeon wanted to 'match up' the other eye that did not have a cataract so husband could go without glasses. This was to have been the 'distance' eye.  Husband cannot see distance at all now. He cannot see me (blurry) if I am five feet away. This comes and goes.  His eye can read prescription bottles, and should not be able to in that eye.  We are seeing the surgeon today. I'd sure as hell like to know what happened.  Is it possible lens was implanted reverse in the eye that is supposed to see distance? Either way, this is going to mean another surgery.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi - glad you're having such good results.  Would appreciate knowing what the diopter settings are for each of your mono IOLs, since you mention they were set for distance.
thanks very much.
laura5121
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9424748_tn?1405134041
Hi LynnAV, Were you a nearsighted person before your cataract surgery? or do you remember your prescription strength? And, if you cannot see close up (you said you have the progressive with clear tops), how do you put on makeup, get an eyelash out of your eye, thread a needle, etc? That is my biggest concern since at the present time I can still see very close up to do those type things. Thanks for any help.
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9424748_tn?1405134041
Cedonulli, This thread is somewhat old, so I'm wondering what you finally decided on doing and if you are satisfied? Thanks!
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9424748_tn?1405134041
HI Baggyrinkle, How close up can your wife see perfectly CLEARLY? Was she nearsighted before the cataract surgery? I am scheduled for getting the astigmatic (toric) lenses but do not know whether to choose the distance or keep the close vision (which I've been used to all my life). I have to choose! I'm so afraid I'll hate that I cannot see to thread a needle (example) without glasses on! AND...with her toric lenses can she see clearly from way far away at all levels up to about arm's length (or closer)? Thank you!
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Avatar_m_tn
I am 37 years old and have been in gas perm contacts since age 12.  I am -19 & -21.  To the surprise of many I continue to see near 20/20 with contacts and can read extremely fine print.  Long story, a year ago I was informed I am a cleared candidate for RLE from a Canadian Surgeon (multifocal are not available for my condition).  With very little understanding of the procedure I scheduled the operation appointment and flew in from out of town but at the canceled at the last minute due to conflicting information about the results.   Despite my awful vision, I have only worn glasses 5 minutes a day for the past 25 years.  RLE is of strong interest to me due to the irritations too often associated with contacts and due to the personal vulnerability associated with dependency on corrective lenses.  Prior to knowing about RLE I just accepted the my condition as my only way of life. But ever since learning of RLE it is continuously on my mind especially during times of contact discomfort.  I think it has made me much more aware of the discomforts I have with the lenses.  Anyways, I have contacted the doctor who is very persistent in telling me to be brave and do it and if I were his soon he would insist I do it.  Despite my attempts to get a best case / worse case vision result scenario from him he just keeps saying I am getting older and will be pre presbyopia soon anyways so why not improve my life today.  When I ask him if I will be able to see my iphone he says “I do not know, maybe…just stop worrying and reading all the negativity…..if you are concerned about that I will give you monovision and if that is not to your liking then I will perform laski later to correct it back to distance”  I do not think I will like monovision  and am concerned that from what I have read in this blog that the far distance set results may be much worse than a natural presbyopia condition.  I really want to go forward with the procedure but not until I have a full understanding of what my worst case / best case scenario will be.   I think that taking the past year to make myself more aware of situations that would most likely require reading glasses has been good for me.  If my worst case condition will be that I cannot read 12 font print 12 inches away than I am ready for RLE.  If the worst case scenario is that I will not be able to see 6 feet in front of me, shave, pump gas, grocery shop or see my girlfriend’s face up close without glasses then I am not ready.  I have been seeking a second opinion from a US Doctor but they will not even talk to me because I do not have cataracts.  I plan to talk to my Optometrist soon about the option of using multifocal contact lenses after RLE as a backup plan in the event of disappointing RLE results.  The first three bloggers make it sound like a great choice but the next 100 make it sound like a terrible choice.   The thought of being free from contacts is amazing but maybe I am just being teased.   Maybe I should just wait for advancements in RLE but the Surgeon is telling me my best window of opportunity is fading as those advancements are far away.   Another thing I do not understand is why someone cannot follow the RLE with a mutifocal IOL.    
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10220754_tn?1408599568
I am a fine arts painter. my eyes are my whole.  My doctor convinced me to go for Toric IOL mono focal long distance.  First eye , the right one severe astigmatism. According to the Dr. it will clear the astigmatism. Long distance Okay, not sharp. Colors clear but not sharp.  Short distance a disaster everything is blurry even at 20 feetl

Second eye I am requesting  a classic cataract lense. Scare of the Toric
I am debating if it was an error in measurements. No one is eager to explain with common sense,  i am a 74 years old male, and scared. Could i go for a second opinion
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Avatar_m_tn
It is surgery, so Medicare and most other insurances will cover 2nd and even 3rd opinions.  
And you definitely need another opinion.
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Avatar_m_tn
I am 33 years old and about to have cataract surgery on my right eye on the 30th of this month. I am getting a monofocal distance in my right eye, my left eye is the natural lens so I see good in that eye. I am worried that I wont be able to see well how will having a monofocal lens in one eye affect my vision? I can't afford the premium lens and got denied for the credit to get one. So I have been trying to get donations, should I just live with having just a monofocal lens in one eye?.
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Avatar_m_tn
There is nothing wrong with monofocal lenses and they are regarded as a 'safe' option, if you read the problems some people have with multifocals on this forum you will perhaps also see monofocals as a safer option with fewer problems such as glare/halos ect.

The surgeon who fitted my monofocal lens only did monofocals and did not believe in multifocals. His advice was to go for a monofocal lens and then wear readers for reading and keep things simple.

Hope that helps.
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Avatar_m_tn
i have 20/20 vision in left with natural lens and cataract in right eye caused by trauma when i was 14, it is 6/20. Have lived with it till now, 57 years old.
I have no problem doing everything without glasses except reading and computer.
I am scheduled for surgery with an aspheric mono focal set for distance. But am worried i will lose my reasonable near sighted vision past computer distance?

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Avatar_m_tn
Hi Notxel

It has been sometime since your post and I wonder if you had the surgery. I hope not.

RLE immediately takes away your accommodation, which you still have at 37 years of age. The surgeon you talk about seems very unethical to me.

Why do people not use multifocals with RLE? The reason is that the RLE patient will feel that their vision is terrible with the multifocals. Even with EDOF lenses, RLE patients might notice a slight drop in visual quality. This is especially true of somebody who wears RGP lenses, as RGP lenses give you the clearest, sharpest vision possible of any corrective method. Anything that you do to remove the natural lens of your eye and replace it with an artificial one will seem like a step backwards from your RGP correction.

One option that you could consider is the Implantable Collamer Lens (ICL). This lens is implanted while leaving your natural lens alone, so you still have accommodation. Your power is right at the limit of what the ICL can correct, so it may or may not be able to fully correct your spectacle power fully.

But you absolutely should not have an RLE, especially RLE with multifocal. Don't ever see that doctor who keeps asking you to go for surgery again.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hehe, I emailed that poster with the exact same advice, literally, like, word for word. I never heard back from them though.
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11424739_tn?1418105064
If very near sighted, do NOT allow your MD to use ALCON Acrysof IQ SN60WF.    I was 14 Diopters with reading glasses.  Got a 7.0 Diopter  ALCON IOL  and it is a disaster.  Yes in the bright daylight, distance vision is good but I can NOT ever drive at night anymore as the specular refractions from white car headlights create white snow.    Also viewing a PC even with reading glasses is terribly fuzzy.  Depth of field is non existent.    A disaster happened in one eye.  i will NOT allow the same thing to happen in the other eye.
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