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Restor Lens Problems
I had cataracts removed 9 weeks ago right eye, 7 weeks ago left eye.  I had the Restor lens put in both eyes.  I have had nothing but problems and curious if anyone else has had similar problems. My first problem was light sensitivity. I had to wear my sunglasses inside for almost 8 weeks (my husband refers to our house as the Bat Cave).  Fluorescent lighting is the worst and thats whats in my office. I had to work with the lights off for the first 8 weeks, I can turn them on now but the light still bothers me. I have dry eyes and it has gotten worse since surgery, the doctor put plugs in my tearducts but I'm constantly putting artificial tears in, which blurs my vision. Then my eyesight kept getting blurry with double vision. The doctor said I have Blepharitis and gave me Azisite. That seems to help but I have to use it every day along with warm compresses and a cleansing routine or the blurry vision gets worse.  She now wants to perform laser surgery on me for a slight astigmatism I have. She says this will help, they gave me glasses to try on with the way it should look after surgery. I can see clearer but still double vision and she doesn't know if that will go away.
I went to another doctor for a second opinion and he said don't do the surgery if there is a chance I'm going to extract the lens and put in a monofocal lens. Now I don't know what to do. I'm scared to have these lens' extracted and would like to try and keep them in. We won't even get into the issue of the so called "halos" around headlights. They are such HUGE spider webs that I can not drive at night any more. Has anyone had any or all of my problems? Has it gotten better with time? Has anyone had the laser surgery for astigmastism after implants? Any help would be appreciated, my quality of life is 0 these days.
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Two thoughts initially come to mind.  First, is this "double vision" truly 2 images either next to or on top of each other??  And is this present with both eyes open and goes away when one is closed??  This definitely needs to be clarified for you prior to any more surgery.  "Ghosting" of images is often a monocular phenomenon, often associated with multifocal IOLs like Restor, and can be researched in the archives of this website.

Treating the dry eye and blepharitis is critical for optimizing vision after cataract surgery, regardless of the type of IOL you have. Be very vigilent about the regimen prescribed, and coupled with time, it does work.
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711220 tn?1251894727
Use the search function.  Your problems are common.

Dr. O.
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I had the Tecnis multifocal lenses inserted in April and have a major halo problem.  In high contrast situations it is obvious that the out of focus light is interfering with my ability to see clearly.  Before surgery I had sharp vision with glasses, now it is hard to see to cut my fingernails even though I can focus at that distance.  I like to do carpentry and woodworking, but it is difficult to see things sharply enough to work safely with tools. I am seriously considering having these removed and going with a single vision lens.  That will require reading glasses, but it it eliminates the halos and give me sharp vision it will be worth it..
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757137 tn?1347200053
If you have been following this forum, you would know that the lenses that give the least trouble are the monofocal ones. It is rare for someone to post complaints about them (except when it is bad surgery). And your insurance will pay for it.
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757137 tn?1347200053
Further to the above. Two of my siblings have monofocal lens implants. They are overjoyed with the results. My brother says he does not need glasses to read normal size type. That surprised me. I haven't asked my sister if she can read without glasses.
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Do you know if monofocal lens implants also have light/glare and halo problems?  I am reconsidering my Restor and Crystalens (I have one of each) as they may have given me lots more sight but way too many problems and discomfort in getting them to actully function for me.  Lots of eye confusion and disorientation.  And I still need glasses 85% of the time, only time I am OK is when I am in a small, perfectly lighted room.
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757137 tn?1347200053
Neither one of my siblings has a problem with glare or halos. What they do say is that they now have the sight they had when they were young. My brother is 86 and my sister is 79.
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757137 tn?1347200053
By the way, after I see my retinologist in November I will probably be ready for cataract surgery. If so I will get the monofocal tecnis aspheric acrylic lens set for distance. There are too many problems with the multifocals and I prefer to be happy.
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Unfortunatley, you have encountered some of the problems I have experienced with the Restor lens, I believe, your symptoms will finally be determined to be Dysphotopsia, many have reported this and if you research on the web, Dr. Bucci has written an excellent article.   Check out his article in Eyeworld.  Halos would have been acceptable to me, but you are experiencing the starbursts at night which can be almost blinding when trying to drive.
I have had all of the symptoms you described but I am also seeing the concentric rings of the lens  on all reflective surfaces, it is displayed in my glasses & sunglasses, the images of the 12 concentric rings keep appearing and multiplying.  My vision never improved and I still need glasses.  Several months later and after having tried anything, extreme migranes, etc., I had no choice but to opt for an explant.  I want to start enjoying life again. Hopefully you will be spared from having to go through this.  Try anti-glare glasses which are coated on the inside as well, hopefuly this will diminish your problem and you won't have to opt for an explant.  Whatever they try to tell you, do not agree to a 2nd Restor lens, it won't get better, you might just be faced with 2 explants in the future.
Good luck to you!  
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574673 tn?1234129578
I had one Restor implanted in July 2008 and explanted in January 2009. I opted for a monofocal toric, to correct astigmatism.  I have been very pleased with my vision. I wear one contact for distance vision and my IOL is set for intermediate giving me a good range of vision. I can read my blackberry and newsprint without reading glasses. I know there have been improvements to these lenses but if you are highly unsatisfied a skilled surgeon can explant them. It was a difficult decision and there are risks but it was more than worth it to live the rest of my life with good vision.  Do your research and find a surgeon who is highly competent, perhaps at a world renowned eye hospital like Wills in Phila.
good luck
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I had one Restor lens implanted in Aug 2009 - On my gosh I thought I've been loosing my mind - I have all the same problems as described. I thought this was only happening to me. We all have these problems in common,  I only wish I would have done this research prior to having this procedure done.

I suffer from Migraines - Waxy lens, Major Halo problems, I can't drive, I have a vertigo, light in every form bothers me.

I am opting for the explant & putting in the Monofocal lens - although I am nervous of the risks, I have to say these risks outweigh the problems I suffer with now.

I had a 2nd opinion with another doctor for the explant - I just need to make the decision now to do this. - I'd like to know if those of you that had this explant of the Restor lens had success, I realize everyone is different but I need some positive results.

Thanks so much to all of you for posting your experiences & problems.
I

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I had Restor lens put in back in 2007.  Halos were very bad but in time they eased up.  Still have some but they weren't as bad until I had Yag lazer in January because membranes covered my eyes again.  Now my distance is blurry and I could cry because prior to this my distance was fabulous and I could read (still can) without glasses.  I guess everyone is different but when they work, they were fabulous.  Don't know if my problem now is lens or if sometyhing else is going on.  Have been to a retina doc and can't get into cataract specialist till mid April.  In the meantime, have started on Restasis for the severe dry eye and have to wait it out.  Don't want to go back to glasses!!!
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HAVE HAD RESTORE LENS IN RIGHT EYE FOR 5 YRS
IT SUCKED WHEN IT WAS FIRST PUT IN AND IT STILL *****
BLURRY VISION, DOUBLE VISION, STILL WEARING GLASSES, BUT THEY NOT EVEN ABLE TO CORRECT-
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Has anybody had success with the Alcon mono focal lens?  After reading about the problems associated with Multicol lenses, I'm inclined to have the mono focal lenses inplanted.

Thank You.
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I have one and it's fine, no problems at all.
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I'm considering Restor MultiFocal lenses - are you still having problems with your lenses?
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Do NOT let them put restor multifocals in your eyes.  I had them implanted in mine in Dec. 2009.  Had similar experience as Zartog did.  Eyes never came into focus at distance, reading, or mid range.  Doctor told me after the fact,
" these lenses are not for everyone, we need to explant them as soon as possible".  
In late January he explanted the right lense And implanted a mono focal which was supposed to remedy the situation.  It would have if he had not damaged the eye in the process.
I had to go to an eye hospital and have another surgery to remove some of the fragments he left behind  from my eye.  Some of them had to be left in my eye because it was too dangerous to remove them.  So the vision in my right
eye is far worse than the left eye which still has the restor lens in it.
I'm stuck now with the restor lens in my left eye forever because it is too dangerous to risk anymore damage to my vision.
This is an example of what can happen.  Don't let it happen to you.  It's too late for my vision.  There is no fix.
Opting for those lenses was the worse mistake Inhave ever made in my entire life. My life is forever changed now with this terrible vision I am stuck with.
If I had only chosen the tried and true monofocals I would not have to be writing this today.
You only have one pair of eyes and they are so  precious.  I cannot undo what I have allowed to be done.  But you can avoid it if you listen to these posts and do not let anyone implant restor lenses, or any other multifocals lenses into your eyes.



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The thing about both monofocal and multifocal lenses is that one size does NOT fit all, and there is no 'best' lens or blanket recommendation that will suit everyone perfectly. To get the best result--assuming the surgeon is top-notch to begin with--patients and doctors have to devote at least as much thought to the choice as they would if they were considering the purchase of a large screen TV or a sound system.  It's not something to be decided a week from proposed surgery.

The general shape of the eye ('long' or 'short'), the corneal curve and condition, the health of the retina, the type of cataract (for those with them), the patient's most important activities, and the size of the pupil are all factors that must be taken into consideration when lens replacement is at stake.

In carefully selected patients with thoughtful doctors, the reStor is a superb lens that provides essentially perfect, youthful vision.  I know, because I am one of these patients.  Two and a half years after having both natural lenses replaced by reStor D1 lenses, I am delighted and amazed each day to see as well as I did when I was a child.

To read more about those who are happy with their reStors and why, check here (although there are other, harder-to-find testimonials on this Board):

http://www.medhelp.org/posts/Eye-Care/multifocal-vs-monfocal-lens/show/1564251
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All the  problems  you state are happening to me! Horrible vision in my left eye after having a restor lens put in in Oct 2012.  Halos, blurry vision, dry eye ,i ncreased eye pressure, worse astigmatism. my dr. Says to put the restor in my remainiNg eye and it should balance out to have functional vision. No way will i do this. I will also not risk major complications to have the lens explanted . This was an expensive decision and stupid on my part not to research this lens with all its problems. My dr say to try lasik to,get crisper vision. I dont think so  i would tell anyone else considering this lens to absolutely not do it
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I had the Restor ACR SoIQq lenz surgery Nov 8, 2012  All I can say is Horrible. I have experienced all the same problems & can no longer drive at night.  All light bothers even Sun light.  I have halows around everything .  I was told nothing can be one. Replacement surger is too dangerous.  Do we have ay recourse? Can they keep implanting these lenses when they are causig so many problems?
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I've had cataract surgery 3 months ago with the ReSTOR lens put in. I've had nothing but trouble since. Eye glasses were used for years prior to the surgery and they were far superior to the surgery and the ReSTOR implants. I'm really sorry this was done.
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a new surgery to install mono could be very good. BUT make sure the surgeon is the best. It very well might be that this is NOT the woman who did your last one. Find the best surgeon to do it.
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I can not believe I was sold into the restor lens. I was told if I paid $5,000.00 extra after medicare I would never have to wear glasses again. The halo, never driving at night, double vision, change of life forever is such a hard thing. My family has had to endure all of my suffering because I am afraid to drive. My doctor has recommened two retina specialist, with no avail. Never have the restor lens into your eyes. If you have any new information PLEASE  let everyone know. Hopless 124
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If you are in this forum I hope unlike myself that you are reading this post prior to having restore lens implanted.
Please do you homework before surgery.  Get a second or third opinion. If your ophthalmologist tells you that none of their patients have had problems DO NOT BELIEVE them.
Talk with local opticians that know firsthand that these lens do cause problems.
I had Restore implanted over 6 months ago.  Of course the goal was to be able to see without glasses.
After all, one should expect that after shelling out 4 to5,000 out of pocket they should be able to see.
Was told that I would get used to halos.  I have not found this to be true.  I feel very limited in driving at night.
After allowing 6 months for the EXPECTED improvement of my eyesight I relented to having the YAG laser in one eye.  Honestly could not tell much difference.  
My eyes were so strained and dry that it began to get on my nerves.The worst issue was that I could not see
lights in distance, all was blurry.
I finally had to get corrective lens to have sharp vision again.
Waste of time and money for me.. I would never advise anyone to have these implanted.  Go for the monofocal lens which has much less reported problems and certainly less expensive.
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March 2013 - RESTOR LENS - EXCELLENT OUTCOME -- I wanted to comment on my great outcome with cataract surgery.  I am 56 years old and had been very nearsighted for many years.  I started to wear glasses in the 3rd grade.  Very nearsighted and had an eyeglass prescription that was well beyond a "minus 6."  My last eyeglass prescription was: OD -12.75 +2.75 x 108; OS -14.50 +0.50 x 042 Add + 2.25; Vertex 13.75.  Since I was very nearsighted and had astigmatism with my right eye, I worried about whether to select a multifocal lens or a monofocal lens.  With this vision, I saw "starring" around car headlights at night and "halos" around car tail lights.  When my cataracts developed, the "starring" and "halos" became dramatic -- long, distorted star points and red halos the size of hula hoops around tail lights.  When I had cataracts, I was struggling to work at my computer and read documents, read books etc.  Dim light affected my ability to work at the computer or read.  Eye fatigue was significant since I work at a computer all day for my job.

I initially was evaluated by a local surgeon who worried about my astigmatism and thought that I should select monofocal lens.  He worried about the Restor lens and wanted to know if I was a "Type A" personality.  My only answer was that when it comes to vision, everyone would say that they are a "type A' when it comes to their eyesight.  He said that if I selected the Restor lens, not to ask for my money back!  He did not discuss any options if any problems did arise.

I was shocked at this discussion and then researched to find a very experienced cataract surgeon.  I went to the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins.  The doctor discussed my vision, how calculations are made to select the right lens, and options if the surgery did not provide good results.  The experience was very professional, informative and re-assuring.  I was prepared to deal with various techniques to correct vision if the Restor lens did not solve my vision issues immediately.  With his advice, I selected the Restor lens -- the results are EXCELLENT!  I had 20/20 vision in each eye immediately the day after surgery when my eyesight was tested.  I could read the smallest of type from the "reading" card.

I spend 10 -12 hours a day using a computer and I spend my time reading and drafting documents.  I am delighted with the results -- it is easy to use the computer and read and draft documents.  I am an avid reader and like to watch movies with subtitles.  I can do all of this easily again.  I am not affected by dim light.  My vision (close, intermediate and distant) is crisp and clear in all lighting conditions.  Although I have some white small halos around car headlights, I can readily drive at night.  In comparison to vision when I had cataracts, these halos are a minor inconvenience.  I have a number of floaters in both eyes and they are "minor" and "in the background" and not noticeable like before I had surgery. I was told not to expect the eyes that I had as a teenager.  It has been 6 months since my last surgery, and I am so impressed with the quality of my vision.  I have not had this quality of vision (20/20) since the 2nd grade.
The Wilmer Eye Institute was an excellent place to have cataract surgery performed.  Everyone involved with the surgeries and evaluations were professional, friendly and conscientious.  Excellent!
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so you chose distance lenses for both of your eyes.  I had distance in left eye and contemplating a monofocal lenses for my right eye although my eye doctor and general practitioner adviced against this procedure.  They both think that distance lenses for both eyes would be more beneficial.  Your thoughts pls.
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I had the restor lenses put in both eyes.  I initially had floaters & a bit of blurry vision.  That all went away.  I do use restasis for dry eye but I used that before the surgery.  My vision is 20/20 in one eye & 20/25 in the other.  At night I do get slight halo effect but not enough to bother me. I can see without glasses unless it's low light, then I use either readers or the flashlite app on my cell. Usually that's in restaurants where I may use the flashlight to read the menu.  I have flourescents at work & they don't bother me.  And it's bright enough that I can use the computer, read, etc without glasses.  So all in all I've had a great experience with the surgery & the Restor lenses.  Unlike when I had lasik surgery years before....my vision is much better now than it was after lasik.  
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I had a Restor Lens 3.0 implant in my left eye on 1/22/14 after cataract formed from vitrectomy surgery for macular hole that I had repaired last year.  i could see wonderful right after surgery and 4 weeks post surgery I am ready to get my right eye done next week 2/26/14.  I do notice halos around headlights but it is not bad.  They tell me it will diminish over time.  Does not prevent me from driving.  I am 53 and work on a computer all day.  I can see just fine without readers.  Only need readers for very small print on labels or low light.  My distance is superb.  I had the laser  cataract surgery and they corrected my astigamatism by making small incisions via laser treatment.  I was petrified to have the surgery after hearing all of the horror stories.  I have worn glasses since age 8 and have been very nearsighted all my life so to have an opportunity to be glasses independent was very appealing considering my age.  Wanted to post a positive outcome as most posts are negative!
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Thank you both for posting.  I also have had wonderful results with my ReStor lens the D1).

As you say, the majority of posts about this lens (and perhaps most of the multifocals) is negative, so positive reports may be helpful to future patients who are trying to decide which lens to choose.
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I had ReStor lenses put in both my eyes about a year a part after cataract surgery.  I was 56 and 57 respectively at the time the surgery happened.  My goal was to not have to wear glasses again as I had them for reading and distance and figured I'd save a lot of money over the years buying new glasses and not having to carry different pairs with me everywhere I went and of course just not have to wear them would be nice too.  My Dr. assured me that I would have 20/20 vision after BOTH lenses were replaced with the ReStor lenses and he is a well respected surgeon in Orange County, CA.  The day after surgery of the second eye I started having major black spects floating around in my eye like a storm of bees.  Went back to my surgeon right away and he sent me to a Retinal surgeon within the 30 minutes of being in his office.  That surgeon had to do emergency laser surgery right then in his office on my eye due to a retinal tear.  That all thankfully turned out okay and I was told is a common complication after any cataract surgery.  So I gave it a lot of time after that to see if my vision was restored by the ReStor lenses to 20/20.  Well its been almost 7 years and that 20/20 never happened.  I had to get glasses again for distance, reading, and my computer not to mention prescription sunglasses (that's 4 pairs of new glasses - very expensive and I don't do designer frames either) as my eyes are so sensitive to bright lights and the sun.  I had to have some florescent bulbs removed above my desk because the glare was so bad I couldn't see to focus on my work.  It's really bad when its overcast for some reason even more than sunny when driving.  Of course there are halos around headlights at night as well. Before the year was up after the surgeries I had major floaters that were so bad at times especially while typing on my computer from marked up documents as a legal secretary it was like I was looking through fog.  I have to have the lighting just right to read anything.  I am really disappointed and mad at myself for falling for the potential promise of 20/20 vision and even more than that the $5,000 out of my own pocket to pay for absolutely nothing with any redeeming value.  I should have gone to Vegas I would have had more luck and fun at least for a bit while throwing away that kind of money.  
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WWR
I had my cataract removed and the restor lens put in and my eyesight is worse than it was with the cataract except for for the cloudy vision.  I am going on my 3rd week and at the doctor's visit they told me to "be patient."  I don't know what to do, but I wish I had done my homework before having this done. I really didn't have the money to have this done, but I was hoping to not have to wear glasses anymore. I need to have the cataract removed from my other eye - but I will certainly not have this restor lens put in.  I will go back to glasses before I will go through an expensive "nothing" which is what this is....
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What to do with side effects of restore lens, Don't have to repeat what already had been said, nothing but problems....Can I sue ?
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Your blessed and good for you, but not for me, nothing but problems and missery.....
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have had all these problems with my eyes after Restor lens. It has been 8 yrs and nothing has improved. It could drive me crazy if I let it. Seeing eye doctor next month to see if removing them is a good idea. Scary thought and I will have a small fortune in my eyes. Has anyone had the extraction done lately?
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I am looking very seriously at having the restor multifocal in both eyes.
At the moment, I wear readers, and my distant vision is starting to go ( 58 y/o ). and they tell me I have cataracts an one eye with astigmatism.
I am concerned about the very negative reviews above, but I am also interested in the success stories.

Can anyone let me know how these go for outdoor activities such as golf and in particular, hitting the golf ball, which is at the intermediate area?
Also, working where the vision is required at about 50cm to 100cm?
any feedback appreciated
cheers
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I was wondering about that too. These lens have ruined my life. I can't even cut my own nails and have trouble reading the computer which I never had before the surgery. Another thing is that I can no longer ride a bike since the restore lens have affected my spactial orientation. I am terrified to have them removed and go from bad to terrible..
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Which ophthalmologist at Wilmer did you go to?
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I had the restor lens implanted in both eyes for cataract surgery.  I initially went to the opthalmologist due to night driving and halos around oncoming headlights.  I subsequently had laser surgery also.  

The good news is I don't need glasses to see or read and enjoy wearing regular sunglasses.

The bad news is the halos/spider webs with oncoming headlights is still a problem.  I too hesitate to do anything additional to my eyes since Restor didn't correct the problem I went to the eye doctor for in the first place.  

I am not too anxious to have the "extraction" as I wonder if any of it will do any good in the end.  It seems the mono type lens has a better reputation after reading the posts in here.  If only I had known.
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Please keep me posted on this problem and any suggestions for correction.  Thank you
pattileona
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I understand your misery! My husband had cataract surgery and was told if we paid $3000.each eye he would never have towear glasses again. Never told us it might not work!!His were worse than before he had implanted.Six months they tried all kind of drops in eyes finally he said take right eye out and put long distance only in. Two days after this surgery he started having black in corner of eye.Dr sid it would go away.Week latr it covered half of eye,Called office they wouldn't let us come in for a week.Dr checked sent us straight to Retinal dr. He had torn retinal and detachment. Worse dr ever seen/ Had surgery and now very little vision from all of this.He may never get eye sight again. Dr said we would get money back but haven't so far. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone!!! Bfore this he wore glasses just to read. Now he cant read  or anything.A year of misery and at least two more yrs not knowing what sight he will get back.
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Amen Don't get restor lens for no glasses. Messed my husband up big time. No help for him now!!!!
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Why is it that sometimes you post it was your husband with the problems,, and other posts you claim it is yourself that had the Restor problems?
Do you have multiple personalities, or are you just trolling?
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That is exactly my story but I am 6 weeks out.  My vision was better with cataract.  I now cannot see distance or near.  I keep hearing "be patient" but it has not improved an iota since day 1.  A contact lens has helped a bit but now I am going for a second opinion in few days.  Good luck to both of us. I will not do my second eye until 1st one is 'fixed'.
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I will advise anyone considering RESTOR to reconsider! I would do anything to have my old lens back. I saw 20/20 distance and had no other problems except for close up... the reason why I sought RESTOR. Got so tired of using cheaters for close up, the arms would break off, miss place them, constantly cleaning glasses, and couldn't keep up with them. They were so aggravating! I thought the RESTOR eye procedure was going to be the answer, but I was badly mistaken! I had the procedure Oct. 2013, it was the worse mistake I have ever made! Have you ever been in a swimming pool with strong amounts of chlorine and your eye's get blurry, or have you gotten Vaseline or something greasy in your eye and it create a film over your eye... that is what I am living with right now. If you go into a store the florescent lights are unbearable! Every moment of every day you are blinking trying to clear your eye's from what appears to be a film over your eye. This procedure caused me to have no more tears my eye's stay dry and I am constantly putting in artificial tears. My eye's constantly feel like something is floating across my eye, like when you get an object like  hair or lint! And... different times through the years I feel like someone shook a dust ball over my eye's... whoa unto me when pollen is falling... it's like sand in your eye's!! The Doctor is a renowned eye specialist in Charlotte NC he basically introduced this procedure to eye doctor's/eye specialist in the region. He takes me through the same test every time and told me to get Restasis, it cost $300.00 for a 30 day supply with coupon $180.00 and it did not work. I have not been back to him because he is costing more than I can afford which I think is the whole idea just to keep me from coming back! He acts like he is insulted when I tell him my complications. Trust me... if I could have my eye's back to what they were I would be glad to wear the cheaters and never go back to the doctor! Yes... I can see up close under bright lights but if the room is dim you will still need glasses. No one tells you about the vision in between the far and medium and the medium and close up... it is awful! I can not read the tags on the shelves in the stores, my eye balls jolt and shake under florescent lighting. I can not stay in a store for any length of time! RESTOR has affected every aspect of my life in a negative way. I pray every day that they will get better and it just hasn't happened! Lasik surgery is wonderful or cataracts lens replacement, I have many family members to have these procedures and they are very satisfied! I am so sad and miserable with my eye's I would do anything to get my old eye's back!                  
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I have all these problems--the dry eyes, the halos, the glare, and I certainly can't read or see at all distances. I was near sighted before the cataract surgery and never wore reading glasses. Now I can't read at all, even with cheaters. I have some mid-range vision. I am totally miserable and the doctor who sold me these keeps saying they're perfect. Not for me! Now I'm having trouble getting the one taken out. I've been to 4 ophthalmologists and I think I've found someone. I can't wait to get rid of this. I stopped after having one implanted. Now to get my money back.
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I felt like I found a friend when you said, "I'd do anything to have my pre-surgery eyesight back."  I've said those same words.  My doctor who insisted Restor was my answer is supposed to be one of the best eye surgeons in Dallas.  Now I'm taking the advice of many who have posted to this site and going out to find several more eye surgeons for their opinions.
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I had the acrysof toric restor lens implants done for both eyes due to cataracts.  This is the worst thing I could have done to myself.  Instead of requiring no glasses I now have computer glasses, reading glasses and progressives.  I could see better with the cataracts than I can now without them!  I was able to get my $4,000 back but it certainly doesn't compensate for the horrible vision issues I have now.

I regret this more than I can say.
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I understand if you had the YAG procedure after the ReSTOR lens... it seals the deal! One lady was told that once you have done the YAG removing the ReSTOR lens would mean 50/50 chance you will go blind!
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I have them also and experiencing exactly what you said about yours. That is why I am on this site to see if others are experiencing the same. I understand after the YAG procedure it seals the deal, to remove the ReSTOR lens means a 50/50 percent chance you could become blind! I am pretty sure we are stuck with these!
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I read where the ReSTOR lens can not be removed after the YAG procedure. I understand YAG seals the deal! If you have them removed your chances are 50/50 you could go blind! Please give us an up-date and whether you had them removed? This Oct. 13, 2015 will be 3 years for me and my eye's are still scratchy, ache, light glows, as if there is a film of Vaseline across my lens a constant blur, I have now started having terrible allergies that I never ever had before, I have absolutely no tears, I never had problems until the ReSTOR procedure. What I would do to get my God given lens put back in! The eye Dr. acts insulted when I went back to see him, and charged a co-pay and the insurance company for a ridiculous amount! He gave me 'Restasis' prescription I did that for 3 months and it did not help at all, 'Restasis cost $300 plus for a 30 day supply I had a coupon for 1/2 price but still expensive. I was reading the insert to see  why it wasn't helping and it said RESTASIS® did not increase tear production in patients using anti-inflammatory eye drops or tear duct plugs. Why would he prescribe something that plainly states this? My Dr. is a renowned specialist in Charlotte NC, he trains other Dr's! He has offered no solution to the problem, apparently he isn't as great as he thinks he is!        
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I am 3 years into the procedure and hate waking up every day and deal with this nightmare. No one has offered a solution! My eye's ache constantly, feels like trash is in my eye constantly, and a film of Vaseline is over my lenses a constant blur. The visions in between the distance, medium and close are terrible I can't even read the tags on the shelves in the grocery store, and the florescent lighting causes pain. I have to wear sunglasses in the store! I understand once you have the YAG procedure following the ReSTOR procedure it seals the deal! To have them extracted would mean a 50/50 chance you would be blind! Can not get any advice from any sites I have been on! My vision was 20/20 distance and medium was fine, I had this done to help close up vision only!  What I would do to have my God given lens back! I can not believe I am going to live with this the rest of my life!!!      
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Worse decision I have ever made, very expensive and completely ruined my eye sight. Constant pain, feels like trash is in both eye's, feels like a film of Vaseline is coated over my lens causing blurred vision, have to wear sun glasses in stores with florescent lighting, can not read tags on shelves as well. I no longer have natural tears which resulted in dry eye's, none of the eye drops for dry eye's help for more than an hour at the longest. I would do anything to have my God given lens back in both eye's! This is a complete nightmare I am going to have to live with for the rest of my life. I understand the YAG procedure seals the deal and extracting them and replacing with regular lens can result in blindness!  
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I feel your pain! The worse decision I have ever made! Having to live with this nightmare is unbearable! The only time I do not have to deal with it is when I am sleeping! What I would do to have my God given lens back! I would rather deal with cheaters for the rest of my life! My eye's ache, have constant blur as if a film of Vaseline is over the lenses, feels like dust is in both eye's constantly and I have no more natural tears! Constantly putting artificial tears in both eye's and relief is temporary maybe an hour! No correcting it, I understand after the YAG procedure it seals the deal and removal can result to blindness!    
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I was told after you have the YAG procedure it seals the deal, your chances are 50/50 that removal can result in blindness
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re: "have absolutely no tears, I never had problems until the ReSTOR procedure. What I would do to have my God given lens put back in!"

Unfortunately cataract surgery would have been necessary eventually, even if you could have postponed it a bit longer until your vision got a bit worse, since cataracts continue to get worse and eventually leave you blind as millions of people in poor countries around the world are now since they can't get treatment. Many of them would love to see, even if they had to put up with the side effects you have.

People need to understand there is a difference between side effects of cataract surgery which would happen with *any* lens choice, and side effects due to a particular lens. If you have a dry eye problem as a result of cataract surgery, the odds are you'd have had that problem with any lens (the only variation I can think of is if there were some lens that could have been inserted with a smaller incision which might have caused less problems, but most lenses would have used the same incision size as the Restor).


re: "Constant pain, feels like trash is in both eye's,"

Again, the issue seems to be problems due to having had surgery,not the choice of lens. Changing the lens wouldn't improve the issue. In fact a lens replacement surgery would risk making dry eyes worse since the incisions to exchange the lens have the same risk of causing dry eyes as the original surgery.

re; "after the YAG procedure it seals the deal, to remove the ReSTOR lens means a 50/50 percent chance you could become blind! "

That isn't remotely close to accurate. Unfortunately sometimes scare stories get spread around regardless of whether they match reality. After a YAG procedure it is true that its most likely a new lens can't be placed inside the capsular bag (something which is true of *any* IOL, not just the Restor lenses). However there are many IOLs that are meant to be placed *outside* the capsular bag. The capsular bag is merely the preferred placement, almost everyone will still get good visual results with an IOL exchange where the IOL is placed outside the bag. There will be exceptions, no procedure or lens is perfect, there are people who have problems even with a monofocal lens placed in the bag with no problems.

It is true that there are fewer lens options for placement outside the bag since they usually use a 3 piece lens for that, and most IOLs, especially premium ones, are 1 piece. However there are still a number of options.


re: "started having terrible allergies"

Those have nothing to do with the choice to have the Restor lens rather than another lens, and  nothing to do with the cataract surgery directly. It is true that dry eye can be a side effect of surgery and that dry eyes can compound allergy problems unfortunately.

Allergies can appear at any age, they may be new or merely be something you are noticing more due to other eye issues.
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re: "I had this done to help close up vision only! "

Oops, I missed that when trying to address the major points, I thought you had this done for cataracts but it sounds like it was just a clear lens exchange. Yup, you did take a risk that you didn't need to take. Fortunately it goes well for most people, but unfortunately someone winds up being the "statistic".
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DO NOT GET THE ReSTOR PROCEDURE! I can not play golf any longer or play cards! ReSTOR is the worse mistake I have ever made, it is a nightmare living with this. I can assure you that I would do anything to have my God given lens back in my eye's! I had perfect 20/20 and medium vision, my close up was why I had it done. The perfect vision is awful now, it took away my natural tears and constantly putting in artificial tears, I feel like a layer of film like Vaseline is over my lens, eye's feel just like when you have been in a heavily chlorinated pool! Florescent lighting is horrible, I have to wear sun glasses in stores etc... night driving is blinding from the halos around the lights! They feel like dust is in both eye's constantly!  With all the complications it interferes with my concentration and my mind feels cloudy just as people describe during pollen season! Don't even consider ReSTOR it is a nightmare!    
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Never ever had allergy problems until after the ReSTOR procedure! It has ruined my life!
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re: "Never ever had allergy problems until after the ReSTOR procedure! It has ruined my life!"

As I posted above, there is no reason to believe that anyone has allergy problems due to an IOL. It is possible that the surgery itself led to dry eyes which makes the allergies more bothersome, but that would be true regardless of what lens you had (unless as I noted above there were a lens which could use a smaller incision which might have slightly reduced the risk, but most would use the same size incision).  

Although you chose to get the Restor lens even without cataracts, the overwhelming majority of people who get the lens due so due to needing cataract surgery (as did the poster who started this thread) in which case they are risking dry eyes regardless of the lens choice. Personally if I hadn't had cataract surgery I wouldn't have risked clear lens exchange at the current state of the art. (and if I had I'd never have gone for the Restor vs. other options, even 3 years ago, but that is a different debate). Unfortunately there is no perfect lens option, so those with cataracts who need to have surgery need to weigh the risks vs. benefits of each option.

Unfortunately some multifocal lenses do increase the risk of seeing such halos, so it is a risk factor to consider. Even if most people don't find it to be a problem,  *someone* does wind up being the statistic who finds it bothersome, so you do need to be prepared for the possibility. Most people however don't find it a problem, especially with newer  multifocal lens designs which cut down on the risk of halos quote a bit compared to older ones.

Actually even some people with monofocals see halos, there is no lens invented yet which doesn't leave some people seeing halos after surgery. Some data I've seen suggest Alcon monofocals might even have a higher incidence of halos than the new low add Tecnis multifocals, based on the data online they submitted to the FDA, but since the data is from different studies the data might be misleading (e.g. they may have asked questions differently so the data might not be directly comparable). Even some people with natural lenses without cataract see halos.  

A study on the new lowest add Tecnis multifocal showed overall people had a comparable or better experience  driving at night with the multifocal than with the Tecnis monofocal. (but some people had problems with each for different reasons).
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I was talked into getting the restor lenses(at a $7000) out of pocket premium over Medicare. Very sorry I did this. After 7months, I am plagued with such severe dry eyes that I look like a Tourettes patient, with all the blinking. I tried  plugs, Rstasis,steroids,Avenova, etc and nothing works. In addition, I can read without glasses, but only when I have a very bright source of auxiliary light, like a miners headlamp. I wish I had gotten the simple, cheaper mono focal lenses. And don't get me started on the 12 halo rings whenever an oncoming car approaches. As far as I am concerned, this new technology is just a way for greedy surgeons to make even more than the Medicare allowances
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Multifocal IOLs  are more expensive that monofocals, much more expensive, give lower quality optics, more dysphotopsia, have more surgical complications and higher rates of re-operation than aspherical IOLs.  The above posting is not ususual.

JCHMD
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Once again, the dry eye issue has nothing to do with the lens choice. You say the lenses were a premium "over Medicare" which implies that you had necessary  cataract surgery (rather than that you replaced a still good natural lens with an IOL), and the incisions made for that are the same whether you get a monofocal or a multifocal lens. The incisions are what cause the dry eye side effect, not the lens itself. Fortunately the issue  is only temporary for many people, and although its possible that having the issue after 7 months suggests it may be permanent, there is still a chance it will resolve. If you never had cataract surgery then eventually you'd have gone blind, so despite the problems you are going through, things would have been worse if you hadn't had the surgery.


The "halo rings" are more likely with a multifocal, though usually only a minority find them problematic, which doesn't improve things of course for those unlucky enough to be a "statistic". Some fraction of people with monofocals get them as well, there isn't an IOL invented yet that doesn't give a small fraction of people problematic halos. Based on data I'd seen unfortunately I suspect the Restor may be more prone to problematic halos than other multifocals (though it isn't clear since I hadn't seen a head to head comparison, merely separate studies which may have asked different questions and not be truly comparable). Although many people who have problems with halos see them disappear in the first few months, with others it can take a year or more, so there is still a chance they will go away. If the issue is too bad, you can consider getting a lens exchange for a monofocal in hopes that will get rid of the issue. However the surgery for that also of course requires incisions which risks making your dry eye issues worse.

The issue of needing a brighter light to read is more common with multifocals since they split the light for different focal points, however even some people with single focus IOLs can need more light to read. I know someone with the Crystalens, which is an accommodating lens, but that still means   it is still a single focus like a monofocal. He brought a reading chart to a meeting in a well lighted auditorium and demonstrated that even holding a folder to cast a shadow on the reading chart was enough to reduce his near vision a few lines. In my case that didn't change mine at all, so I don't know how much of the variation depends on people's sensitivity to light or if the lens I got does  have better contrast sensitivity. I have the Symfony  lens which is "extended depth of focus", neither a monofocal nor a multifocal.

I will note that as people age they need more light to read, but I don't know how much of that is due to aging of other parts of the eye, or how much of that is due to the aging natural lens. If the issue is mostly the lens, its possible that although you need more light now than you used to in order to read, that you'll need less than others your age when you get older.
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re: "lower quality optics,"

There are obviously unfortunately downside risks with multifocals which patients should be educated about beforehand to be sure they really are comfortable with the risk/benefit tradeoffs. However I'd say "lower quality optics" isn't quite the right way to put the concerns you are referring to.  In important ways the optics aren't "lower quality" in the sense that distance visual acuity is comparable in the modern multifocals, as a surgeon noted in a  recent trade publication:

http://crstoday.com/2015/12/top-picks-of-the-year
'According to Dr. Mackool, for all practical purposes, the distance acuity provided by the AcrySof IQ Restor +2.5 D IOL “is equal to that of an aspheric monofocal IOL. The importance of this simply cannot be overemphasized.”  '

Modern multifocals seem to have comparable distance visual acuity to monofocals in good lighting. Unfortunately usually most multifocals do have lowered contrast sensitivity compared to a multifocal,  which means distance acuity is lower in lower light conditions which could be labeled "lower quality optics" in some sense. The newest generation of multifocals  (low add bifocals, and trifocals that aren't available in the US) doesn't seem to have as much impact on contrast sensitivity as the older generations. Fortunately I didn't go with a multifocal, the  Symfony uses diffractive optics but isn't a multifocal, and seems to have comparable contrast sensitivity to a monofocal.  

Dyphotopsias, unwanted visual artifacts, are more common with multifocals (though a majority of people are happy with the results and don't report problems), but I'd labeled that a separate issue from "optical quality" partly since only a minority have problems.

re: " have more surgical complications "

I"m unsure what you are referring to here. Since most multifocals are now the same physical size and overall shape as monofocals, it seems like the surgical issues should be the same as monofocals. There are potential complications like halos that may lead to a need for more surgery to replace a lens. However  I guess I wouldn't label that a "surgical complication" (which seems to refer to direct complications from the actual initial  surgical procedure itself)  rather than a complication that might need to be fixed surgically.
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Obvious, typo correction, this: "Unfortunately usually most multifocals do have lowered contrast sensitivity compared to a multifocal," should of course have said "compared to a monofocal".
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Given all the extra expense of the restor multifocal IOLs, there is total failure to achieve expected outcomes that the glossy advertising propaganda talks about.  Just because you pay for a “premium lens" costing thousands of dollars out of pocket, don't expect better outcome.  A person can research these lens' but ultimately one relies on their MD's recommendation, and my Dr said I was perfect for them.  

My distance vision may be improved by 30%, with the Dr saying I could probably pass the drivers exam (20/40).  No way, even if I could fudge the test, would I drive like this!  I have at least 50% worse reading vision.  Post op I only saw smudgie lines, I've now "improved" to seeing somewhat faded,  broken letters.  

I wasn't expecting youthful 20/20 vision, but the soft-edged vision is unacceptable.  I think I could live with halos, but I have funneling concentric rings at night driving.  The literature boasts not having to rely on corrective lens' anymore.  Well, without corrective lenses, I would need a dog. I have this come-and-go flickering, like a tuning fork, going on and it's annoying.  The Dr frequently harps on there being no guaranty, but is pushing me to have it explanted, before a 6 month time frame.  Do I really want to incur more costs,  and enter into another post op 'no guaranty' zone?  No thanks.  I'm lucky I had the fore site to cancel the other eye implant, so at least I have one good eye which is easily corrected with glasses. Don't. Do. It!
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re: "My distance vision may be improved by 30%,"

You seem to be lumping in a few issues, some of which you likely would have had even with a monofocal. The distance vision should be comparable to what you would have had with monofocals and the odds are if you'd had a monofocal implanted you would have the same distance vision complaint.  The most common reason would be   your distance vision is off because you were left nearsighted (or less likely, far sighted so your distance vision is between the two best focal points). Could that be the case? Unfortunately there isn't an exact formula used to determine lens power, they base it on statistics about how prior patients have done and the result can be off.  If that is the issue then even with a monofocal lens your distance vision would be bad. You can correct it either with glasses/contacts, laser surgery, piggy back lens, or lens exchange.

If that isn't the explanation, if that is your "best corrected" vision and there is some other eye health issue, then that again would reduce vision with a monofocal as well. The near vision may also be the result of either an eye health problem or the power of the lens being off so reading doesn't fall close to one of its two focal points.  

The halo issue unfortunately happens more frequently with multifocals (and my impression from reading is that other multifocals have  lower odds of issues than the Restor lenses), but even a minority of patients with monofocals get halos. Many of those who see halos see them disappear in the first few years, others can take longer, and a minority unfortunately do continue to have a problem with them.  The "flickering" issue you mention has a variety of possible explanations, since unfortunately that vague general description can apply to multiple possible causes. Some of the issues would  apply to monofocals as well. If it is within the first 6-8 weeks of surgery it may be that the lens hasn't fully healed within the capsule and is moving. Or it may be a "dysphotopsia" which your brain may learn to tune out, or which is sometimes treatable with a piggyback lens or a lens exchange.

In my rare case (unlikely to be your issue, but its possible) the flickering seems likely  to be due to iridodonesis, my iris jiggling (visible in video I made with my phone when experiencing the flickering) when my eye moves, so if this were the issue it would go away if you focus on one spot and become worse when you read. It doesn't seem to  relate to the type of lens implant i have (Symfony, not Restor. It isn't clear if it would be worse or better with a monofocal). In some highly myopic people the artificial lens is enough smaller than the natural lens that the iris looses support and can move. In most cases this doesn't seem to cause visual issues, but in a small fraction  of people it does. I have light colored eyes (blue) but with darker striations in between and so when the iris jiggles the stray light going into the eye varies. Or at least that seems the most likely explanation.
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AMEN:  everyone that thinks that forking out the extra bucks for a "premium" lens is guaranteed to be happy and glasses free please read the above.

JCH MD

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I had cataract surgery 7 weeks ago. AcrySof mono focal lens implanted in dominant right eye. Was myopic, -3.25. ORA system used to try to ensure best refractive target (Plano); however, result was slightly hyperoptic (!) (+.25) and light flickering, like bad fluorescent lighting, has plagued me since bandage removed first day postop. Have seen another ophthalmologist and a retina specialist. Ophthalmologist has seen iris "fluttering" and lens "jiggle" in the capsulary bag. BTW, I have dark brown eyes. Focusing on one fixed spot when reading does stop the flickering but flickering also occurs from bright overhead lighting such as at work (lens edge reflection?). I can't imagine living 25 years or so with this constant flickering and want to consider a lens exchange but Dr is concerned whether another lens will fill the capsular bag and/or support the iris any better. Canceled left eye surgery until RE is resolved.  I've been following topics and posts, hoping to learn more and maybe find a solution to these problems. Would appreciate comments/advice. Thx
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First of all your IOL power is fine for distance (20 feet or more) and should give you 20/20 distance vision (if no residual cylinder)  plus/minus 0.50 is well within the accepted range of IOL power done pre-operatively.  The symptoms you describe (IOL dyphotopsia) normally get better over time (weeks to months). The IOL you have is a high quality and not associated with increased rates of dyphotopsia (such as the ReStor and ReZoom)    If IOL is in good position and no other problems and distance vision is good (and near vision with reading lens). Would really think twice before exchanging IOL.  Tinted prescription glasses with anti-reflective coating also helps in some cases.  JCH MD
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Thank you, Dr Hagan. At this time, my vision is not correctable with glasses due to significant differences in unoperated LE and operated RE. I'm wearing a contact lens in LE to achieve vision balance, which gives a version of mini-monovision. I had intended to have non-dominant LE corrected in this manner but have canceled LE surgery as I really couldn't tolerate both eyes flashing at me!

I tend to be a perfectionist and problem-solver type, plus had read IOL exchanges should be attempted as early as possible, so have been seeking a resolution but your more conservative approach might be best. If only I could know whether there will be any improvement, even it takes months.

Another question: since IOL is loose in the capsule, if PCO developed, requiring YAG treatment, could this change IOL position and my vision? Could IOL slip out of the capsule?
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If your refractive error is +0.25 and your eye is healing otherwise normal your vision without glasses should be 20/20 or there abouts.  Without glasses or contacts your distance vision should be much better in the operative eye than in the unoperative. Eye you would then have "full monovision"  Operated eye for distance unoperated eye without glasses/contacts for near.     If your operated eye is not 20/20 at distance (and 20/20 at near with about a +2.50 reading glass) then you would need to have an explanation.  Its not at all likely that the minor "flutter and jiggle" you describe (usually due to torn or lax zonules) would create a problem with a yag capsulotomy.  You might confirm with the surgeon that you do not have "pseudoexfoliation" a condition that predisposes to lax/weak zonules (and glaucoma) and also that there were no operative complications such as capsular tear or vitreous loss.

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re: "plus had read IOL exchanges should be attempted as early as possible"

I suspect part of that may be fear that you will eventually get PCO and need a YAG treatment, since after a YAG the replacement lens usually can't be put into the capsular bag, which is where they prefer to put it.  Different lens models are used outside of the bag and there are fewer choices, but it is still possible, even if the risks are a tiny bit higher. A prominent surgeon I had a followup with said that it appeared based on how I was healing that it was unlikely I'd ever get PCO and  since the surgical result looked good that I could get a lens exchange at any time in the future if needed, even years later.  It could be that a lens exchange would be easier before the capsular bag healed around the lens in the first 6-8 weeks, but you would be past that by the time you got an exchange now.

re: "Ophthalmologist has seen iris "fluttering" and lens "jiggle" in the capsulary bag."

My impression is that usually by 7 weeks the capsular bag should have healed around the lens well enough to keep it from moving ,  think the guideline I'd read was 6-8 weeks, but perhaps those are merely the usual cases  and you are just a low probability  outlier and it hasn't yet finished healing to prevent the lens from moving.

The question is whether as the Dr. mentions the issue isn't the lens moving within the bag, but the bag itself jiggling due to the zonules (like ligaments) holding the bag in place being loose. Unfortunately if the zonules are weak, any additional surgery like a lens exchange risks making things worse.

  If the zonules are loose, in some cases they suture the lens to another part of the eye to stabilize it, presumably in this case if your iris is moving that would need to be the scleral wall. I have heard that this has risks itself , and again the trauma of surgery might make the zonules worse.

As I've mentioned in my post, my issue seems likely to be from iridodonesis, iris jiggling, but I hadn't been told of any useful approach to consider treating that. There are some larger lenses I've heard of in clinical trials in Europe that may fill the capsular bag more,  but I  I hadn't tried to get an opinion about whether they might make any difference, or whether its too late after having the smaller lens in the bag for a year now (and I'd read negative comments about the one I was wondering about since it doesn't have regular haptics and so a surgeon was concerned that if it didn't fill the bag well it might move).

I have read that the lens jiggling, psuedophakodonesis (though there are a few variations on the spelling) can be harder to see if the eye has been dilated with drops that are  cycloplegic, which most drops they use for dilation are. A cycloplegic is  a drug which reduces accommodation and tends to tighten the zonules which may reduce the jiggling. Often eye surgeons see a patient after their eye has been dilated by staff, so you might ask about that if that is what has been done so far. There are non-cycloplegic dilating drops, so perhaps the doctor might consider  using them to look at you, or looking at you   before your eye has been dilated if he hasn't.
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re: "If only I could know whether there will be any improvement, even it takes months. "

I should add that unfortunately that isn't possible for anyone to predict since each person's case is different, in addition to there being multiple potential causes for the issue. There are a few threads around the net about the "flickering" issue from people whose surgeons are usually stumped. Some of them see the issue resolve in a  few weeks, or a few months, others in a year or so, some report still having issues years later.  In my case I've seen glacially slow improvement over the 1 year its been since my surgery now,  but it has improved, so it is possible it will eventually go away. I may take another stab at trying to find options, perhaps consulting an expert on dysphotopsias. I've just been cautious about risking making things worse if there is a chance I can neuroadapt.  There are some cases of things that might be described as flickering that are due to stray light reflections in the eye that are  resolved with a 2nd piggy back lens.
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I've been told IOL position is good. Operated RE distance vision is 20/20, near vision good w/reading lens. Eye health pre- and post-op good. No dry eye, pressure problems, glaucoma, etc. No capsular tear or vitreous loss occurred during/from surgery. Lens jiggle was noted at 4 weeks as was iris fluttering. Eye has been examined before and after dilation. I will ask about pseudoexfoliation at my next appointment but it hasn't been mentioned. I have searched for and read other threads and articles about flickering on the net, seeking answers.

It would seem the surgery was a success but the patient still has a vision problem! From the 1st day, the flickering has been there and there has been no change or improvement. Maybe it's the floppy iris or maybe issues with the zonules. I certainly don't know and the doctors I've seen haven't had definite answers, which is why I turned to this forum with its doctors and knowledgeable participants. I appreciate the responses. I certainly want to take a cautious approach and not make my situation worse. Maybe I should try hypnosis to attempt to speed up neuroadaption!
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At 4 weeks the lens may not have been healed completely in the capsule, I'd see what they say at the 2 month mark to see if it is lens movement within the capsule or the capsule moving from loose zonules (either from pseudoexfoliation or whatever other reason).  If it is loose within the capsule past when it is supposed to have healed, I'm wondering if   suturing/gluing would  be an option if that movement is the likely cause.   You could mention where you live in case anyone has any recommendations for surgeons experienced with dysphotopsias or other issues there.  

The lens I mentioned that is physically larger and comes closer to filling the capsule is the WIOL-CF, a premium lens (extended depth of focus/possibly accommodating) which isn't approved in the US yet. Although it is approved in Europe, from what I've read however they are still focused on doing more testing and potentially refining the product more before they start widespread commercialization of it. That suggests being cautious before considering it, which is part of why I hadn't tried to get answers regarding whether it can be used for a lens exchange or needs to be implanted only right after removing the natural lens before the capsule collapses, and whether or not its larger size could potentially have any impact on iris movement (I wonder in retrospect if I'd not have had an issue if I'd gotten that lens to begin with).  

One surgeon who sometimes posts on this site, wanlien3,  had expressed concerns in email to someone  about the design of the lens however since it doesn't have haptics to keep it in place, though he hadn't personally used the lens and was just speculating about concerns (they expect filling the bag to keep it in place). I do see one paper online talking about case reports of 2 people where the lens dislocated, but I don't know what the overall statistics are since other types of lenses can dislocate also.
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how did you proceed to get your money back?  Did you ask your surgeon or get an attorney? I am having the same problems as you and everyone else on this board
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Let me add my miserable experience to that of the other Restor sufferers. After a year, I still have very bad eye problems, and blink so much that people think I have a tic. I use Hydroeye supplements 4 daily, all sorts of drops, eye lash cleaners, etc, but nothing seems to help. It is impossible to read except with an auxiliary type of light, like my phone flashlight, and mid range acuity is terrible.  I am a sculptor and have a lot of difficulty focusing. Of course, I have the halos and glare when driving at night.

My renowned eye doctor in Sarasota Florida pretty much has given up,trying to help and says my problems were all pre existing.  He had no problem cashing the $7000 check above the Medicare payments, though.

In my opinion, the Restor lenses are a scam to pad the pockets of the docs who are not content with the normal insurance payments.

I just wish I had the normal mono focal lenses which seem to work for most everyone. Since I had the YAG, I know it is not advisable to take out these lenses, so I will suffer with them the rest of my life.
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As the doctor seems to be struggling to post off an iPhone, I thought I'd elaborate that as he says, it is possible even after a YAG to have a lens exchange to a monofocal. The issue is that after a YAG it is likely that when they remove the lens, the  capsular bag where they prefer to put IOLs likely won't remain intact. However there are IOLs that can be placed *outside* the bag , they are merely designed a little differently (and usually monofocals). If you look at a thread here on "Should I risk for IOL after 24 yrs of Aphakia?" you'll see someone who needs to have a lens implant that goes outside of the bag (he never had a lens implant so his capsular bag isn't intact to place an IOL into it).

Obviously some of those issues like halos and glare and lower quality midrange vision are related to the lens choice unfortunately. The majority of people are happy with multifocals, the existence of an unhappy minority doesn't make them a "scam". What might be considered a "scam" is if they didn't properly inform you of the risks beforehand and the slight possibility you might wish a lens exchange.

I will note that some of the issues you mention don't have anything to do with the lens choice. The issue of using drops suggests eye problems like dry eye which can be a side effect of cataract surgery. Whatever issues you are using drops for have *nothing* to do with which particular lens you had put in .
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I should add that it isn't clear that you would have had any better midrange vision with a monofocal.  Unfortunately the US IOLs are bifocals that are best for distance and near, though the newer ones have lower near adds so they should be better with intermediate than older high add bifocals.  Outside the US they have better lenses for intermediate (trifocals, even lower add bifocals, and extended depth of focus like the Symfony).  If the Crystalens accommodates at all (vs. the small minority that have it essentially perform like a monofocal), it may be better for intermediate than US approved bifocals
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A contrary note here:  

In 2010, I had cataract surgery for both eyes.  My surgeon is an unusally thoughtful person, and after careful assessment of my eyes ("far-sighted," small pupils, very slight astigmatism), he chose the ReStor D1 lens for me.

One day after each surgery, my vision, from 14 inches from my face to infinity, was perfect.  I had almost the vision of a kid again, with only the need to wear readers in very low-light situations.

Six years later, this is still true.  I got a superb result with these early ReStor lenses.  
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177275 tn?1438375244
Just because you had yah capsulotomy does NOT MESN THEY CAN'T BE REMOVED AND MONOFOCAL IOL PUT IN
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177275 tn?1438375244
Working off iPhone on road yag  and mean   Spellcheck changes above
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For me, Dr. Hagan, iPhone plus road equals dam* strange keystrokes.
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177275 tn?1438375244
Back home to the land of full keyboards.  As Softwear Developer says its not that the IOL can't be replaced after a yag capsulotomy.   1. It often is not possible to put the replacement IOL "In the capsular bag" but their are IOLs for "out of the bag"placement and also anterior chamber IOL. The primary problem is that if a yag capsuology has been done there is usually vitreous loss at the time of surgery because the posterior capsule doesn't hold it back.  Vitreous loss means a vitrectomy at the time of surgery and increased risk of retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema but the risks are still low.

It's important to remember that these health forums attract UNHAPPY people. the people that have had RESTOR and are happy are not her posting good results.  I know there are ophthalmologists and optometrists that have had RESTOR put in their eyes.
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I wore progressive lenses for about 25 years. At 64 I decided that I had enough of broken glasses reading in bed. I went for a consult with a very reputable eye laser company here in Toronto.  After all the tests, (no blood work) they can only restore my far vision at the cost of $6,000 +.  I did some research and found a doctor in India .... made a appointment through their site. To my horror, they knew nothing about it when I got there. Wasted trip, I thought, but then once I got to Calcutta with friends who host me when in India, recommended a clinic. I still did my research, but decided to take their advice.  Got an appointment within a couple of days. Family member accompanied me as I do not speak the language.   Once I got in to see the doctor, to my great surprise,he was the same one I had researched days earlier.. He personally saw to all the tests hovering over the technicians I had to go through. They sent a nurse to the house to take a blood sample and after all the other tests, he said I was a candidate as I had no diabetes..this is very crucial. I had one eye done and the other two weeks later and a final test two weeks after that. I was 67 at the time. I developed infections after, but that was due to allergies. He advised me every step of the way and at that point I had traveled from one end of the country to the other.  I only wore sunglasses while outside, but don't have to anymore, unless the sun glare is bad. I now wear non-tested sunglasses. As of today exactly 2 years later (2016), I am told that I have young eyes by my dentist. I left it at that, but now people recognize the true color of my eyes and think I have color lens....not so...the natural color is now vivid as they are not under thick bifocals anymore. I am ecstatic...I can read in bed, sleep at any angle... the kicker... I now have almost 20/20 vision... and the cost for the best lens made the US...still a fraction of the cost of the $6,000 Canadian with lifetime warranty. I can contact him directly whenever I need to.
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177275 tn?1438375244
Anyone considering "medical tourism" should do their 'due diligence' research first. This is a start from Consumer Reports:  https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2007/01/medical_vacations.html
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I'd 2nd the issue of doing due diligence,  the medical standards in other countries aren't always going to be the same as the US is on average.  That said, *if* you are willing to do the research,  the cost difference can sometimes allow you to be treated by a high quality doctor (e.g. some of the best surgeons in Europe) for less than it would cost to see an average surgeon  here (or less than the out of pocket costs here if you have a high deductible and would get a premium lens).  You can also often get the latest American technology.. that isn't yet approved for use in the US.

I should add that   its useful to do "due diligence" even for surgeons in the US  since   even within the US   treatment quality can vary.
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I am in the UK and had my first eye fitted with multifocal 3 years ago which instantly caused halos/glares. Back and forth to the optometrist for 1 year then eventually went for the 2nd eye doing but with a view to discuss the halos/glares with the surgeon first. The surgeon informed me that once the 2nd eye was done it would balance out my eyesight and the halos/glares would disappear - not so! I then had halos/glares in both eyes! This week I finally saw the surgeon again (a different surgeon same Company) who told me I could have an explant but they couldn't guarantee it would stop the halos/glares also it could change the structure of the eye and cause further problems. He said because the halos/glares have been bad from day one it is not the lens that is causing the problem but my brain acknowledging the lens and dealing with the change. He is now suggesting YAG as I have cloudiness particularly in the right eye, and says it could help slightly. To be honest my eye sight too me is fine I just want rid of the halos/glares. I am so unsure of having any more work done to my eyes as I can't possibly deal with anymore problems. Can anyone confirm that there is a possibility it is my brain not being to adjust to the changes. If so I could consider hypnotherapy!!
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177275 tn?1438375244
Any IOL can cause halos/glare. That being said the problem is much higher in the multifocal/accommodative group. Some people can adjust to these and tune them out that is called neuroadpatation. Many people they never go away. The problem is the IOL not your brain. What you have been told is true. There is no guarentee that if you had and IOL exchange and a monofocal IOL put in that they would go away. usually they do but not always. There is also the problem of seeing worse due to infection, bleeding, inflammation or retinal detachment so it should be a huge problem before you take that kind of risks. Have no idea how hypnosis might work or not work.
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As the doctor says, the odds are good that a lens exchange will improve the halo situation (even if you still have halos, they might be smaller/less troublesome) but there is no guarantee since some people get halos with every lens that exists.   The risk of halos differs even among monofocals, I would be sure to check out the statistics  (or have the doctors provide them to you) before going to the trouble of  having them do a lens exchange.

One concern is that you might wish to research the issue further before getting a YAG.

A YAG can complicate doing a lens exchange since afterwards its probable that are replacement lens could no longer be placed in the capsular bag. A lens exchange can still be done, it merely slightly increases the risks (I don't know how much, I haven't had reason to check on it). They can put a replacement lens outside the bag (or partly in and partly out), and the odds are you'd still have good visual results, though there are fewer lens options available since most lenses are designed for placement inside the bag.

For patients just considering what lens to go with, the Symfony reportedly has a risk of halos comparable to a good monofocal (while providing more near), but the safest bet for someone wanting to get rid of halos and not wishing to risk more problems is to go for a monofocal.
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