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reSTOR lens disappointment
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reSTOR lens disappointment

I had a reSTOR lens implant plus astigmatism adjustment for my left eye on December 20. So far it has not worked out: in comparison with my right, glasses corrected, eye; although the whites are whiter and brighter, the printed information is fuzzier and gray, and looks like milk or whitewash has been spilled on it.

It's hard to believe that reSTOR has not delivered what I want: clear, sharp near vision and far vision with sharp well-defined print and clear objects. My surgeon says that possibly a further correction to astigmatism and/or lens change is needed. I would think a lens change would mean a larger incision since you can't  "refold" the present reSTOR lens to get it out.

Given that I expect only clear well-defined images at near and far (halos won't bother me), have no known eye diseases, and had good eyesight before the cataracts, is there any reason to not have success with reSTOR?

How much is this operation an "exact" science? Should I have expected the operation to have been done "right" the first time, or is this thing a hit or miss proposition? Where can I go on the internet to objectively check out a surgeon's experience and capability for this operation?

Tom Jacobs

Tags: cataracts reSTOR
2078052_tn?1331936700
There are many reasons for decreased vision after cataract surgery:  astigmatism (which is not corrected by a multifocal implant lens), residual refractive error (the eye is slightly nearsighted or farsighted), ocular surface issues like dry eye or blepharitis, hazy posterior capsule behind the implant, macular edema or fluid in the macula (center of the retina), the inherent optics of a multifocal lens (because the optic splits light between far and near, there is a reduction in contrast sensitivity).  The brain does seem to adapt to the lens over time; if your surgeon says that everything else is normal with your eye, it is wise to give it a bit more time.  A lens exchange can be done through a small incision, if needed; it is possible to re-fold the implant lens in the eye and remove it.  A second opinion is a good idea before proceeding with a lens exchange.  Look for a member of ASCRS, the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons.
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