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Post Operative Infection of Belly Button Wound
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Post Operative Infection of Belly Button Wound

I have had my gallbladder removed 2 weeks ago, by keyhole surgery..I was almost forced out of hospital the day after surgery (that's how it is in the UK), despite bad reaction to anaesthetic, awful surgical pain, etc.  The matter that is really concerning me now however, is I have an infection in the belly button wound - even the day after surgery, I was aware of a bad smell from the wound.  However, without any advice on how to care for my wounds on leaving hospital (only being given painkillers)...it was a journey into the unknown - been through many stages with it, but presently 9th day of seepage of sometimes blood and yellow pus from wound.  Swab finally taken by doctor, being analysed at the moment - hoping against hope that it isn't MRSA (the hospital I was treated in, the only one in my town, being quoted as having highest incidence and death rates from this, now almost rife infection in British hospitals).  I have just finished a course of cymolexin antibiotics and have now been prescribed pro-amoxiclav antibiotics...Does anyone have any insight on this please?  What might I expect, what can I do to help myself, and, out of interest, how common is such an infection of this kind after such surgery.

Many thanks.
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I don't have the will to seek for statistics, but surgical wound infections in general are "common". Most often causes are staphylococci and streptococci. MRSA are type of staphylococci, which are resistant to some antibiotics, but they can be sucsessfully treated with vancomycin (and other antibiotics, according to antibiotic suspectibility testing).

MRSA is not more dangerous as other staphylococci. The problem is that it is often not recognized as MRSA, and treated as usual staphylococci without testing it at all. Staphylococci are dangerous when they enter the blood, but this is obviously not in your case, since staph septicemia is a shock-like disease.

After testing, you can expect apropriate antibiotic treatment, whatever the cause will be. Pro-amoxiclav and other antibiotics will be tested on the swab from your wound, and then antibiotic therapy adjusted, if necessary. Just continue with amoxiclav and wait for results. Staph can be easily be spread to others by direct skin contact, or with contaminated gauze, so be careful.
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