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cascade stomach and diabetes
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cascade stomach and diabetes

I was wondering if anyone can give me some information on a cascade stomach, symptoms etc... I've had stomach problems for as long as i can remember. I'm 27 yrs old and have had diabetes since i was 9. In my early teens only my upper stomach always distended after a meal but in the past 10 years my stomach and my intestines swell up after meals, so bad that at the end of the day i can hardly walk. I also feel very tired and very ill after meals. By accident they found out i have a cascade stomach (through an endoscopy). Does this affect my diabetes? As it takes a while before the stomach empties then, doesn't it?
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A cascade stomach is a term that's used to describe the appearance of a stomach that is slightly 'off kilter' from the 'normal' position. In the 'normal situation' the fundus is a pouchy area at the very top and to the left of the esophagus. From there, the fundus descends into the 'body' of the stomach and then kind of makes a turn or curve, to move upward toward your middle/right side. So it's kind of a 'U" shape - not completely, but close. So the food enters and basically bypasses the fundus and moves into the main portion of the stomach (the body) and the lower part of the stomach, the antrum.

In a person with a cascade stomach, the fundus is still in it's normal position relative to the structures of the left upper quadrant but the proximal portion of the body of the stomach is in an abnormally anterior and superior position.

When this type of stomach is filled with barium or filled with food (with a person in a upright position), the food or barium separates and for whatever reason gets 'confined' to the fundus. For whatever reason there's a 'ridge' there which forms a very high level and it's not until move 'stuff' enters and it spills over into the next section (the body), that the food starts to get processed. So if the stomach is looked at using an x-ray or fluoroscope, barium first fills the dependent, posterior fundus to the highest level of the “ridge” and then spills or “cascades” into the body and antrum.

I don't believe it would affect your diabetes, but you'd have to ask your doc about that. However, the most 'usual' gastric problem for someone with diabetes is gastroparesis - did anyone mention that at all?

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