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Anyone test pos after 8 weeks/11 weeks/12 weeks?
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Anyone test pos after 8 weeks/11 weeks/12 weeks?

I was concerned to know if anybody could answer if someone who tested negative then positive after those testing times. Most will agree that after the 8 weeks your chances go down and at 11/12/13 weeks negative you are pretty much in the clear. Just some pretesting anxiety.
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29 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_n_tn
True.
But,
CDC recommends 6 months testing.
Some experts say 6 months testing is required for drug users, immune system disorders. However, CDC rejects this statement. I don't know what are they trying to do. Scare tactics or something like that.
On the other hand, the U.K government reported that, in 10 years of period, no one seroconverted after 3 months. The official window period for hiv is 3 months in U.K.
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Avatar_m_tn
Do they say this because drug users are still getting high and that interfers with the results accuracy, or is it because it takes longer for intraveinious conversions? I wish they would list the factors envolved. It amazing how vague everything still is at this point in time. The official is 3 months i know but most test pos within the first four weeks, then there is another group that will convert at  the 6-8 weeks mark, the majority. Then there are the people that take up until the 12 week mark which i've tested negative up to. I'm still concerned based on the symptoms i've experience plus the manor in which i was exposed that my next test will be pos, i hope i'm wrong but i'm still very concerned. I was utterly shocked at my 12 week negative, my doctor even got a little flustered when i questioned how certain they were that it was correct.
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Avatar_n_tn
I feel desperate.
I am reading hiv related subjects since July.
There is no certain answer for the window period. Then, I accept 6 months period to be 100% sure.
I might be wrong but while CDC is mentioning only 97 percent of people produce antibodies in three months, how can I relax?
Doc Bob from thebody.com says, if your partner is hiv positive, take the test at 6 months again.
This is the most stupid approach ever seen. Come on doc Bob. How can I know whether my partner is hiv positive or not..If I know she is hiv negative, I will be lving my life instead of writing to you.
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188761_tn?1320166132
The best thing that I can suggest you guys here is, believe in what we are telling you that 3 month's conclusive and 6 weeks negative changing ahead is unheard and very unlikely.

Now, stop reading about HIV on the internet and switch off your computer.
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Avatar_n_tn
mike, my exposure was very risky. Insertive anal sex.
How can I switch off my computer?
today, i am going to take 4 months test.
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188761_tn?1320166132
"How can I switch off my computer? "

Go to Start menu and find for "Turn Off Computer"

Face it man, you have your 12 weeks negative and it won't change, you can keep frenzying over it you will only get a negative result for this exposure.

You don't need a 4th month test, you don't have HIV, that's just my take on it.
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Avatar_m_tn
i had my DUO negative 6 weeks test. I feel bit confident when u said u never unheard of 6 weeks negative turn positive. I had at 25 days aswell. Today is my 8th week --shall i go today or wait for one more week to be more conclusive---Stress is too much to handle--Work--Pain-Mental-Physical--All at ones---
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Avatar_m_tn
Panic, the CDC does not recommend 6 months and raj12345 you never had a risk to begin with so both of you need to move on.
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Avatar_m_tn
agree with teak and mike. leave it alone
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Avatar_n_tn
4 months. Negative.
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Avatar_m_tn
Congrats--Good going--
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Avatar_m_tn
Raj if you're going to waste time and money on another test, wait until 12 weeks... Or else you will just go back again anyway...

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Avatar_n_tn
To people who read my comments:
please do not take my comments serious .
3 months is conclusive.
However, I have a mental problem (I guess).
Therefore, I am going to take tests until 6 months.
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Avatar_m_tn
what shall i do dude--Never been in so stressfull condition--I cant think of the day i slept from 60 days. Right from the incident--been to almost all good doc in london and spending money in pounds is the toughest part. One Doc says he will do a free test after seeing him for 5 times. I shall do that free test at the 12th week. But one test before that will def ease my stress..Thanx for advice..
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Avatar_m_tn
admitting is the first step to recovery!
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Avatar_m_tn
Yeah, I had the same concern, mainly because my "ARS" happened as I got my test, even though it was 14 1/2 weeks. But of course it was negative and was a waste of time, and caused much undue stress.
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Avatar_n_tn
Besides, the doctor in my clinic told me that: "Do not come to test again for that exposure!"
Ok. I think I am starting to accept that 3 months is conclusive.
The bad part is that, I am using 1,5 Lustral in a day. However, I could not pass the period.
Anyway, you were right: Teak and ExtremeStress.
But, why does CDC recommend 6 months? LOL
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Avatar_m_tn
It doesnt recommend 6 months.

It says in some cases it takes up to 6 months.
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Avatar_m_tn
Is it possible to know ur exposure dude---
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Avatar_n_tn
CDC doesn't recommend 6 months testing but says in some cases it takes up to 6 months.
Now, give me a proof that we are not rare cases.
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Avatar_m_tn
No one can give you proof, but they can point out that you are extremely unlikely to be among the .0012 that maybe, thought unlikely, turn positive after 6 months. If you wish to persist in thinking that you may be, and if you wish to persist in your belief that exceedingly unlikely things are bound to happen to you, I would suggest:

*Never driving an automobile again - homicidal strangers do throw rocks from overpasses.
*Wearing thick rubber shoes just in case a lightning bolt strikes you out of a clear blue sky
*Doing a check for lions and tigers as you exit your suburban or urban home because people have been so killed, albeit very, very rarely
*Wearing a helmet at all times when out of doors (objects have been known, though rarely, to rain down from the sky and crush skulls, after all)
*Getting meteor strike insurance on your home, because, you know, it has happened.

Can I tell you that none of that crazy and deadly stuff is going to happen to you? Actually, no, because even if it has happened to only one person, ever, it still has happened. Can I tell you that you probably shouldn't live your life worrying about any of the events described so much? Why, yes I can.

This post is not in jest, nor is it meant to make light of your situation. It is an attempt to help you gain some perspective on the notion that you may test positive after testing negative on a 3 month test. Is that really going to happen? No, it isn't.
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Avatar_m_tn
With direct quoting, it is often a good idea to include the source for one's material. For instance, the following comes from the CDC:

"Most HIV tests are antibody tests that measure the antibodies your body makes against HIV. It can take some time for the immune system to produce enough antibodies for the antibody test to detect, and this time period can vary from person to person. This time period is commonly referred to as the “window period.” Most people will develop detectable antibodies within 2 to 8 weeks (the average is 25 days). Even so, there is a chance that some individuals will take longer to develop detectable antibodies. Therefore, if the initial negative HIV test was conducted within the first 3 months after possible exposure, repeat testing should be considered >3 months after the exposure occurred to account for the possibility of a false-negative result. Ninety-seven percent of persons will develop antibodies in the first 3 months following the time of their infection. In very rare cases, it can take up to 6 months to develop antibodies to HIV."

Link:  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/testing/resources/qa/be_tested.htm.

*****

Here is the San Francisco AIDS foundations interpretation of this:

he "window period" is the time it takes for a person who has been infected with HIV to react to the virus by creating HIV antibodies. This is called seroconversion.

During the window period, people infected with HIV have no antibodies in their blood that can be detected by an HIV test, even though the person may already have high levels of HIV in their blood, sexual fluids, or breast milk.

Here is what the CDC says about the window period:

    "Antibodies generally appear within three months after infection with HIV, but may take up to six months in some persons."

This CDC definition of a three to six month window period has been commonly used for a number of years.
What does this mean for you?

    * The three month window period is normal for most of the population. Many people will have detectable antibodies in three or four weeks. Very, very rarely (i.e., only a few cases ever), a person could take six months to produce antibodies.

Link:  http://www.sfaf.org/aids101/hiv_testing.html#window

*****

This is certainly not a comprehensive overview of the topic, but it does provide a brief, and, in my opinion, accurate initial primer on the 6 month question. My own reading on the topic has certainly led me to conclude that a 3 month test is conclusive (and, in fact, in many cases may be overkill - but, I will leave that debate to others).

In the end, though, so much of this debate is pointless. Everyone will eventually test out to the number of months with which they feel comfortable. Some will feel good with a 6 week test, other with a 3 month, and still other will only gain comfort with a 6 month or even 1 year or more test. You have to do what puts you at ease, really. The danger is, though, in allowing this to become a long term obsession. At some point, you will have to accept your results and move on.
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Avatar_m_tn
Although i've tested negative twice for hiv and stds up to the three month mark, i'm having trouble accepting my status based on the strength of my symptoms and gut feeling. I've had the most serious exposure one could possibly experience (needle stick/by homeless iv drug user). Infetion/coinfection with hep a/b/c are also serious thing i must worry about as 80+% of iv drug users have hep c as well. The symptoms i've experienced go well beyond the listed symptoms for either disease not to mention my symptoms started earlier/stronger than most information symptoms guidlines indicate. A guy who tested pos for hiv/hep-c said without giving his personal details that it took him 8 months to convert! Dr.HHH said this is not possible and that the turn around time is the same in the ask a Dr. forum on several posts. I never got a rash which is odd because both cause rashes so my thinking is i would have had a rash. He knows his stuff but i'm still concerned.
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Avatar_n_tn
your guy that took 8 months was probably positive by much earlier ... and was he an iv drug user himself? Because that alone can delay the window period.
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Avatar_n_tn
and if youre really concerned, have you tried a DNA PCR test?
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Avatar_m_tn
Yes i'm very concerned. The dna pcr is very sensative to the point of giving positves. I was under the impression that he was a user, unlike myself. Why does Dr.HHH say that nothing outside of cancer/chemo can delay detection? I'm sure given his speacialty that he has had many expiriences with these type of exposures. I've been coughing as of late, something i never did before, i'm done for...my throat is also bothering me as well. Hiv/hep-c........
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Avatar_n_tn
chronic usage can delay seroconversion according to medical experts, i have no literature to cite at the moment. If you do not use on a regular basis, you are not subject to delayed seroconversion. Needle stick incidents are indeed risky, but there is only a tiny chance you will be infected
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Avatar_n_tn
not to leave you concerned, but i think youre fine -- stress and anxiety can bring on many, many symptoms unfortunately. Calm down and consult with your doctor, who probably will say you do not need anymore testing.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thank you for your kind words. It's very hard to shake these fears, but i'll try.
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