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post-op transexual hiv transmission risks
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post-op transexual hiv transmission risks

Hi,
I've been in a serious relationship with a male to female post op transexual last year for about 8 months., that ended in october 2008.
While i was with her, i know that she has cheated on me.

I've had unprotected sex with her after the fact (i didn't know), let's says the month after, then she has admitted it and we broke.

The question about having sex with a possibly infected partner who has had a vaginoplasty is far from being well documented around: are the tissues inside the sex-reassigned vagina more or less subject to transmit/receive hiv virus through unprotected sexual intercourses ?

I'm now with a new girlfriend, and of course, she's asking for my std's status.
I've been for a true test this week and i'll know the answer in one month .....

What are the chances that i got infected by my last partner (the transexual) ?
I talked to her 6 months after we broke and she told me she just got tested and everything was fine.....but i don't really trust her since she already lied to me and had had this risky sex affair.....

i've been auto-testing myself with hiv testing kits available on internet, all the tests were negative and one was discutable (and i passed another test after that discutable one, that came out negative like the other 5 before)....

All these tests have been made between 3 and 9 months after the last sexual intercourse with her.(i know it sound a bit compulsive, but i think i'm part of the worried-well)

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580755_tn?1357673215
3 months will give you a conclusive negative...you are negative. No need for any additional testing.
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Avatar_n_tn
I have been searching for more information and the answer to that question as well, though not for the same reasons.

I happened to come upon a site that is devoted to post op transwomen http://theipowa.org/ and I saw the topic "Safe sex with neo-vagina: same risks?"

Question: As a post op, I don't menstruate, I don't have periods, so no blood. I just got married to the man of my dreams. My friends say it is okay, if he performs oral sex on me, and when he inserts his penis in me, he doesn't have to wear a condom, are they correct?

_______________________________________


Answer: She is still at risk for contracting and spreading any STD, that any other person would be. The research is still out as to how infectious the fluids that come from the Cowpers gland can be in the transmisssion from an HIV+ post op. The Cowpers gland is found under the prostate gland, and is responsible for the pre-cum or clear fluids that you see emitted from the penis. In a post op women that fluid may provide lubrication to the neo-vagina.

Again, what risk that poses to her partner is not statistically known. It is known though, that the receiving partner, is at a higher risk of infection. And all the other STD transmission rates remain about the same, for syphillis (syphilis), hepatitis, herpes, etc.

Also a post op woman is also at risk for UTIs, urinary tract infections. Basically, for the most part a post ops vaginas', flora and fauna is the same as a natal female. It smells the same, tastes the same, feels the same, and is prone to pretty much the same concerns.

Additionally, the Cowpers gland, which is part of the prostate gland continues to secrete fluids, and may aid in vaginal lubrication of the post op, as it is not routinely removed in SRS surgery, though long term HRT will have caused it to diminish in size.

The Cowper's gland also known thebulbourethral glands are compound glands, each approximately the size of a pea. During sexual arousal each gland produces a clear, viscous secretion known as pre-ejaculate or pre-cum. This fluid helps to lubricate the urethra for sperm to pass through, and to help flush out any residual urine or foreign matter.

Finally, a study has been done that hypothesizes that vaginal transmission of HIV is less effective than anal transmission. The study Prevalence of HIV antibodies in transsexual and female prostitutes:

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence was studied in an unselected group of 216 female and transsexual prostitutes. Subjects were asked about age, biological sex, marital status, children, length of occupation, sexual practices, and drug abuse history. Blood was drawn on site. All 128 females who did not admit to drug abuse were seronegative; 2 of the 52 females (3.8%) who admitted to intravenous drug abuse were seropositive. In contrast, 11.1% of the 36 male transsexuals (including 3 out of 32 non-drug abusers) were seropositive. The results support the notion that vaginal transmission of HIV is less effective than anal transmission.

http://theipowa.org/?q=content/safe-sex-neo-vagina-same-risks
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Avatar_m_tn
You are conclusively negative.
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