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24yr Old - small hair loss spot becoming bigger!
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24yr Old - small hair loss spot becoming bigger!

Hi all,

24yr old male... hair loss doesn't exist in neither my Father or Mother's blood-line.

About 6 weeks ago I was having a hair-cut and it was pointed out to me that I have a bald spot on the back left hand side of my head. At the time it was about the size of a 50cent coin.... it has now doubled in size and if I tug at the hair around it - it falls out fairly easily compared to the rest of the hair on  my head.

Is this what you would call Alopecia Areata?

How much will it spread?

These steroid injections/tablets I hear of - do they work for everyone, or only a small % of people?

The last thing I needed in my life was this... been quite a lot of depressing news the last few years in regards to my health.

Any help / answers would be greatly appreciated.

Will make an appointment to see a Doctor who will most likely tell me to see a Dermatologist.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi, Kampf -

It does sound like Alopecia Areata.  Alopecia means "hair loss".  Alopecia Areata is patches of hair loss, Alopecia Totalis is total head hair loss, and Alopecia Universalis is hair loss over the entire body.  They don't know what causes or triggers alopecia but it is believed to be an autoimmune disorder.

You mention other health problems -- so your doctor will know if the hair loss is related to your health issues.  

There is no telling how much your hair loss will spread.  Every case is different.  My husband also has alopecia, and his hair loss just comes and goes all the time.  I have Universalis (all though I do have some head hair and eyelashes).  Some people get one spot, it grows back -- never to have another.  Every case is different.  

Just as every case is different, the success or failure of treatment is different for everyone.  You should see a dermatologist.  I tried the steroid shots in my scalp years ago, but it didn't work for me.  It does for some people.

As an upside to alopecia -- it doesn't hurt physically, it's not going to kill you, it's not contagious.  You need to try to guard your mental health and not get too depressed.  Personally, I like bald men as a lot of women do!  You're not there yet, and you may never get there.  So, please don't worry too much...

You might take a look at the National Alopecia Areata Foundation's website (NAAF.org) for information and possible support groups.  You'd be surprised at the people who have alopecia.  It's quite common, actually.  Feel free to contact me if you want.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks for the reply :)

Well I've booked in my appointment with the Dermatologist (4 week wait til I can see her). In the mean time my doctor has given me some Cortisone fluid to rub on the affected around - he said it may have a small chance at reducing the spread of it or slowing it down until I can at least see the Dermatologist.

These steroid injections that the Dermatologist prescribe; are they injected into the skull? (ouch haha) If so - how painful is this?

If I had a nice rounded head shape I'd be more then happy to embrace a bald skulk but unfortunately a hairless head for me just won't work lol.

Quite weird that I usually don't care about how others perceive me / judge me but damn the fear of losing my hair for some reason is quite worrying.

Guess I just have to keep reminding myself that things could be a lot worse :)
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