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After Pericarditis
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After Pericarditis

Hello everyone, this is my first time posting on here and any help given would be much appreciated. I am doing a paper for an Anatomy Class that I am taking and part of it is a question about Pericarditis. I need to know what happens after a pericardiotomy. Once the sac around the heart is removed what measures are taken? Does the body kick in itself and take care of the heart? Is the pericardium replaced? My professor mentioned a fluid that takes place of the fluid that was in the pericardium, does this exist and if so what is it? I thank you all for your time and help.
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear AE,
The pericardium is important in giving structure to the heart and also providing a lubricant in which the heart beats.  When it is removed there is a slight dilatation and a change in the septal motion of the heart wall.  The changes are not significant here are no adverse effects in general of a pericardiotomy.  The pericardium is not replaced.  There may be some slight amount of transudative fluid in the pleural space that helps to lubricate the heart but I don't know what answer it is that your professor wants.
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Avatar_n_tn
My husband (evidently) had pericarditis,at some point, which led to constrictive pericarditis. This condition means that the sac around the heart has become calcified (hard as cement) & is growing inward...constricting. He had a partial pericardectomy in August 2000. (The surgeons removed as much as possible, without costing him his life because the calcification was adhering to the heart.) He is in poor health now, suffering from heart failure. But, in regard to your question...he said that immediately following surgery, he was & is VERY aware of his heart beating. Sometimes it feels like his heart bangs more freely than it should & he has a very irregular heart beat (all the time). I don't know how others fare who have this surgery, tho I'm told the prognosis is good when caught in the early stage. (My husband's disease was very advanced, with calcification 1 1/4" thick!)
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Avatar_n_tn
I am 39 years old and have had bouts of perocarditis for the last two years.  It has become chronic for the last year.  I have seen Cardiologist, and Rheumatoidologist.  I am currently being treated by Steriods and immune suppressive medications.

My case is not yet considered Major in that the actual thickness of the lining is only up to 1/4 of an inch.  This deasease is however having a large negative effect on my lifestyle and quality of life.  I am unable to do any physical exercise or activity that causes an incresae in heart rate with out aggravating my condition.  My energy level has thus significantly decreased.

I have been on Steriods to control and limit the symptoms, but have not been able to get off them.

Any comments on how to resolve chronic "minor" pericarditis would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks..
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Avatar_n_tn
sorry to hear of your bouts of pericarditis & that you're in poor health. My only advice is to be SURE you are getting the best medical treatment on the planet because the further this goes, the worse it is.
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