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Aortic Stenosis
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Avatar universal
Aortic Stenosis
My mother is 62 yoa and in great health other than being diabetic which she has had great success at controling.  Her blood pressure and pulse rate are great however she has just been diagnosed with aortic stenosis (she was tested because she was having rapid heart beat, extremely tired and such)  and will have to go thru with the catherization procedure tommorow and will definately have to have surgery in reference to the aortic stenois.  What are the risks and how dangerous is the heart valve replacement considering her age and health (very good health overall).  Thanx for taking the time to read my question.
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238671 tn?1189759432
The risks should not be too high. Of course, there is a small risk of death, heart attack, stroke, kidney failure etc. with any cardiac surgery. As far as cardiac patients go, she is fairly young. The risks of leaving severe aortic stenosis untreated are much higher than the surgery itself.
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Avatar universal
I would like to add that the hospital my mother will be a patient at is East Carolina Medical Center.  It is highly respected.  Again thanx.
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238671 tn?1189759432
While I do not know the medical center personally, as long as she has an experienced surgeon, she should be fine.
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My father is nearly 90 years old and two years ago was diagnosed with aortic stenosis.  At that time, it was not considered severe and no treatment was recommended.  The same cardiologist diagnosed blocked carotid arteries which were severely clogged and also did not recommend treatment.  Upon second opinion my father underwent surgery on the carotid arteries and came through with no problems and a very good recovery.  Now, however, the aortic stenosis (caused by calcification) has apparently worsened.  Because of his age, despite the fact that he is otherwise healthy (he has also undergone two hip replacements in the last ten years),his cardiologist is still not recommending surgery but has advised taking zaroxolyn and aldactazide.  Would you agree that the risk of surgery in a patient of this age outweighs the benefits; are there less invasive forms of surgery now available or are there other non-surgical treatments available?  Thank you in advance for your response to my inquiry. Deborah. W.
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just diagnosed with an aortic stenosis.  surgery is being recommended.  explain what happens with this condition and what the surgeryis or does.
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Hi my name is Matthew Hanson and I was diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis right after I was born.  This was in 1982 Eight days later I had sergery to fix the problem.  And now I'm 17 years old and doing great.  I hope your mother's procedure goes good too.  Oh if its not too late tell the doctors the try their best to flatten the wires on the chest.  That is if it is open heart sergery.  Mine creat a bump on acrost my chest and I bump them all the time.  Its the pits.
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I have been diagnosed with a bicuspid aortic valve. The problem is not severe enough for surgery as yet. I have been taking lotrel 5/25 for high blood pressure. My pulse runs on the high side usually 90-110. My doctor (my gen. practitioner) wants to put me on tenormin, one half of a 25 mg. pill once a day as an addition to the lotrel (my bp is still up, too) Is this a good idea ?
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My father-in-law has aortic stenosis which was what the Drs in Delhi India have confirmed he is doing fine otherwise besides having an allergy for the last mth or so where he had incurable itching all over the body he has some relief now(I'm not sure whether there's any connection between the two). He is around 65yrs old and otherwise in good health. Could I get an opinion whether he should be imm operated or we could wait till we conduct further analysis. Also is there any risk in waiting or would he have symptoms before something was to happen?
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I had aortic stenosis at the age of 13.  Had surgery at 13.  Now I'm 35 and guess what I'm doing it again this time I have a narrowed bicuspid aortic valve.  My 1st operation was done  thru my back. I think they'll do this new one from the front.  I am living a full life and was surprized to learn I will have another operation.  My Doctor tells me this is the last time.
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My 85 year old mother, after a brief syncope (faint) from which she totally and fully recovered, was diagnosed to have aortic stenosis.
She had few other health problems (only other one was some leg ulcers which were healing).  The cardiologist/surgeons said she was a 'prime candidate' for AVR (surgical valve replacement) because of her 'overall good health.'
But I was dubious - she was over 85, and despite her overall vigor/strength, I felt open heart surgery at 85 should only be done if an emergency, not an 'elective' procedure.  But they proceeded to condut the valve replacement.

THey removed her calcified valve, attached a pig valve. Then, in the OR, noted 'massive, uncontrollable bleeding' in her aortic root.  They removed the pig valve, tried to stop the bleeding. THey could not.  And the patient was dead within 16 hours, cause of death:  surgically-induced bleeding.,

So this should be a 'cautionary tale' to all:  If you or anyone you know/care about has reached 'elderly' age (80 or above, but especially over 85), consider open heart surgery ONLY if the patient is in critical/emergency condtion, and about to die. Because I think, based on my one and only experience, that open heart surgery on the elderly is much too risky, if the person/patient is NOT in critical condition, but the surgery is being done mainly as a 'preventive.'
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My 85-year old father went to doc for breathlessness, tired, joint pain (all symptoms of myledyspastic).  Doc told him his heart was 75% blocked and said he needed heart surgery and the sooner the better.  My unsuspecting dad agreed.  The one-week anticipated stay in the heart hospital was three weeks; he survived, then had a bleeder on the brain two months later.  The next doc said you need brain surgery; family let him do it as he said he would be fine afterward.  He survived brain surgery.  He continued to deteriorate and three months later he died of myleplastic, a treatable blood disorder.  He survived heart surgery, brain surgery, then died of an untreated treatable blood disorder.  On his deathbed I asked what he was dying from and was told myleplastic.  I said, what's that.  They looked it up, called a hemotologist, cathed him, began to clear his bladder, gave him the appropriate medicine, but too late, he died that night.  How can this happen?  
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