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Aspirin
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Aspirin

I am taking Aspirin 81 mg everyday. Would you please advice me can I take Omega3 Fish oil if I take Aspirin. Is it create any side affect?

Thank you
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367994_tn?1304957193
You should consult with your doctor before taking any medicaiton, but there is information that aspirin and In combination with omega-3 fatty acids could be helpful in the treatment of some forms of coronary artery disease.

Again consult your doctor about whether this combination would be appropriate for you.

Thanks for the question, take care

Ken
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Avatar_m_tn
Thank you Ken
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976897_tn?1379171202
In the UK, during cardiac Rehab, we are given extensive education on diet. They encourage patients to take omega fish oils, preferably through eating oily fish once or twice a week. Eating oily fish rich in omega oil will not affect aspirin at all.
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367994_tn?1304957193
Foundation for IgA Nephropathy:

There is one specific drug interaction that needs to be considered. Fish oil may enhance anti-platelet action of Aspirin and other NSAID's ( COX-1 type, Ibuprofen, others). Therefore, use of fish oil together with aspirin (especially daily low dose as used to prevent strokes and heart attacks) may be harmful. As with everything else you may read on this website, the decision to use fish oil or not in combination with these drugs must be taken by patient and nephrologist together, weighing potential risk and potential benefits. There cannot be a blanket recommendation that applies to everyone
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976897_tn?1379171202
Latest research doesn't seem to be agreeing. An Italian study found there was a 45% decrease in sudden cardiac death in patients who suffered a heart attack when taking 3 omega pills a day plus a baby aspirin. What they found was that aspirin enhances the effects of omega, in that instead of 6 pills a day to get the required amount, you only need to take 3.
In Europe there are new studies starting which will evaluate the effects of aspirin because this drug doesn't seem to be having the desired effect. What seems to be happening in reality is that more people are suffering heart attacks even though they are on aspirin. There have been many journals published on women taking aspirin, who are developing breast and pancreatic cancer. This increase in risk is thought to be linked to aspirin. I think the general feeling among some scientists, hoping to prove it through research, is that aspirin should be totally replaced with omega oils. Omega oils tend to control inflammation, normalise blood pressure, lower triglycerides and raise HDL. All the things we would hope for by taking other medications. Maybe we will see aspirin AND statins removed as a standard therapy for something far more natural.
Eating oily fish once or twice a week, as I suggested, is not going to affect the aspirin because the level of omega would be far from sufficient.
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1236893_tn?1408490528
As per Dr. Arthur Agatston
taking daily aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke. Recent research has shed new light on this. Indeed, mounting evidence reported in a number of leading medical journals now suggests that if you’re healthy and not at significant risk for a heart attack, you should not be taking aspirin preventively. That’s because the studies show that aspirin doesn’t reduce the risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke in healthy people. Furthermore, the potential risk of a cerebral hemorrhage, gastrointestinal bleeding, and ulcers outweighs any heart benefits the aspirin might provide.

However, if you've already had a heart attack or stroke, or if you have been found by your doctor to be at high or moderate risk for heart attack or stroke, the benefits of taking aspirin can trump the risks. That’s because aspirin acts as an anti-inflammatory and an inhibitor of blood clotting. For those at risk, aspirin is one of the drugs in our arsenal (along with statins, ACE inhibitors, and beta blockers) that can help keep a coronary event from occurring in the first place or recurring.

As far as what dosage works best in people for whom aspirin is recommended, I suggest you consult your own doctor. Based on the new research, I no longer recommend aspirin (not even 81 mg low-dose, or baby, aspirin) for any of my healthy patients, because the risk of bleeding is two to four times greater than if you aren’t taking aspirin at all. I do, however, continue to recommend 162 milligrams daily (two low-dose aspirin) to patients who already have coronary heart disease, have already had a heart attack or stroke, or who are at high or moderate risk for one and not at risk for gastrointestinal bleeding.

In addition, I now follow the recently revised American Diabetes Association guidelines for aspirin use in people with diabetes. Whereas the ADA used to recommend low-dose aspirin for every diabetic patient over the age of 40, their new guidelines suggest aspirin as a prevention strategy only in those with diabetes whose cardiovascular risk is above average. This includes men over age 50 or women over age 60 with at least one additional major risk factor. In other words, according to the ADA, younger diabetic patients without associated cardiovascular risk factors appear not to benefit from taking aspirin.

Remember, if you do take aspirin regularly, you should not drink alcohol because it can also irritate the stomach lining. In addition, because aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), it should not be taken with other NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen. And because it can thin the blood, avoid taking aspirin with anti-clotting medications, such as Coumadin (warfarin) or Plavix (clopidogrel), unless advised to do so by your doctor. The bottom line here is that if you’re healthy you shouldn’t take aspirin without a cardiovascular risk assessment by your doctor. If you’re not sure about your risk of heart disease, get tested. Today there are many advanced tests (such as a heart scan for coronary calcium), beyond the basic lipid profile, that can help you and your doctor determine where you stand.
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