Heart Disease Expert Forum
Blood Pressure - What is MAP ?
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding heart issues such as: Angina, Angioplasty, Arrhythmia, Bypass Surgery, Cardiomyopathy, Coronary Artery Disease, Defibrillator, Heart Attack, Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Pacemaker, PAD, Stenosis, Stress Tests.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Blood Pressure - What is MAP ?

Dear Sirs,

My electronic blood pressure measure device, as 4 types of readings: Systolic Pressure (SP), Diastolic Pressure (DP), Pulse Rate and MAP.

The first three I know what they are, but the fourth, MAP, measured in mm Hg, what is it ?
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
Dear Jose,
Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) is the average pressure that occurs over the entire course of the blood pressure cycle and is calculated by (2XSBP + DBP) divided by 3.  This is a measure that takes into account both the peak and valley and is useful in monitoring patinets especially in acute settings.  Its use in long term monitoring is less useful but it should be around 80 mHg.  

Normal pulse is 60 to 100 so 80 to 90 would be in the normal range.  Anxiety does not usually cause resting heart rates in the 130's for a hour or more so I would look for other potential causes such as high thyroid or heart arrhythmias.
11 Comments
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Could someone please explain how MAP could be calculated by SBP*2+DBP/3 and normal be around 80? since normal BP is supposed to be 120 over 80, that would be a MAP of 106.666...., would that not be considered very high?  I personally have not looked into MAP, but the formula the Dr. gave just made no sence to me.   could someone please elaborate on this matter.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Dear friend,

That kind of question is exactly the same that I want to make also to the doctor, but I hadn't yet the opportunity in this forum (always displaying the page that there is no room for further questions in the day). I think that you are absolutely right; or the formula is wrong or the reference values are wrong. Even if the formula was (2DP+SP)/3, a normal pressure of 120/80, would give 93,3 mm Hg and that's not in the 80's range.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Look what I find:

MEAN ARTERIAL PRESSURE - The average value for arterial pressure. MAP may be calculated using the following equation: [systolic BP + 2(diastolic BP)] / 3

But, also for this formula, I think 80's range is low
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
The good doctor was not saying that 80 is a normal MAP.  He said 80-90 is a normal pulse rate.  In healthy young persons, 100 to 140 mmHg systolic and 60 to 90 mmHg diastolic is considered a normal B/P.  Abnormal findings: systolic pressure PERSISTENTLY above 140; diastolic pressure above 90.  When either the systolic pressure is 160 or more or the diastolic is 115 or above , the elevation is considered severe.  Blood pressure varies with age, sex, altitude, muscular development, and physical and mental stress.  Mean blood pressure is half of the sum of systolic and diastolic values.  For a normal person in good health is about 100 mmHg
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I agree with you in what regards to the value of 100 mmHg, but assuming the formula (2DP+SP)/3, as a ponderated mean,and not only the simple arithmetic mean (DP+SP)/2
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I agree with you in what regards to the value of 100 mmHg, but assuming the formula (2DP+SP)/3, as a ponderated mean,and not only the simple arithmetic mean (DP+SP)/2
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Mean Arterial Pressure
MAP = (1/3) (SBP - DBP) + DBP

Here is yet another formula I found.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Extrinsic influences on arteriole tone maintain mean arterial blood pressure


Extrinsic control of arteriole radius is influenced by neural and hormonal mechanisms, of which activity in the sympathetic nervous systems is the most important. In contrast to localized changes in blood flow caused by intrinsic controls, extrinsic control mechanisms produce widespread changes in arteriolar resistance.


Recall that F = DP / R


This formula can be applied to the entire circulation as for a single vessel, with F being the cardiac output, DP being the mean arterial pressure and R being the total peripheral resistance, most of which is generated in the arteriole system. Thus


Mean arterial pressure = Cardiac output
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
My heart races a lot (its gone up to 180 bpm!!) In anxiety, what is the maximum heart that is considered within the normal range for a panic attack?? Can it exceed 140 bpm?? My episodes last for 15mins sometimes to an hour.  Its really scarey! WHat heart arrhythmias could be causing my heart to race so muc, ventricular or atrial?

What is the relationship between a fast heart and BP.   My BP is usually low.  But my heart rate fluctuates a lot and so does my BP! What does this mean??

Thanks,
Sabrina
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I am really confused with this MAP.  Will some Cardiologist please give us, once and for all the right formula.  And then explain what it means.  and what the results should be for a healthy heart and BP?????? lee534
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
A related discussion, MAP was started.
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
A related discussion, Cardiovascular was started.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank