Heart Disease Expert Forum
Cardioversion or Anti-Arrhythmic Medication
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding heart issues such as: Angina, Angioplasty, Arrhythmia, Bypass Surgery, Cardiomyopathy, Coronary Artery Disease, Defibrillator, Heart Attack, Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Pacemaker, PAD, Stenosis, Stress Tests.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Cardioversion or Anti-Arrhythmic Medication

Regarding your response to the poster below about his/her 50 day long atrial fib episode - our father is going through something similar. He has a CHADS score of one (only because they suspect a partially clogged artery but it’s one of those arteries in the back of the heart so they are not positive if it’s the artery or something in the diaphragm that’s showing up on the nuclear stress test – you’re right, we are confused also with this).

Here’s the question we are facing now, even though he has no bad symptoms (pulse about 80’ish), he’s approaching his 90th day of being in afib. What do you think of cardioversion or using something like flec to try to get him back to sinus rhythm? The cardiologist said it’s our decision and that he would have no problem with having him stay in afib. Doing nothing doesn’t sound right to us (other than a daily aspirin with metoprolol and a statin). Our father would rather do nothing more. Your opinion?
Related Discussions
1687176_tn?1321401609
Converting someone back to sinus rhythm can be done either electrically (DC cardioversion) or by medications (pharmacological). Regardless of the CHADS score, a clot in the left atrium/left atrial appendage needs to be ruled out by TEE or with empiric treatment of anticoagulation for at least 4-weeks +/- confirmation by TEE.

Medications usually used for cardioversion include Class III antiarrhythmics such as amiodarone, sotalol, or dofetilide. Class Ic medications include flecainide or propafenone -- but are contraindicated in those patients who have a history of coronary artery disease of any kind. These medications need to be administered by a licensed physician.
2 Comments
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Its your dad's life and thus his decision to make. If he has decided he wants to do nothing more and his cardiologist has discussed his options to him, then I would suggest that you honor your father's decision.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank