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Diagnosed with SVT, now changing?
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Diagnosed with SVT, now changing?

I am a 27 year old female, fit and otherwise healthy. My thyroid function is normal, I'm not at all overweight, no family history of heart problems and no other known health issues. For over 10 years though and probably longer, I have had episodes of what I thought was SVT. Before I saw anyone about it, I just assumed I had an anxiety disorder and would just wait hours (usually 4-6 but often longer) for the condition to pass.

At 22, my partner made me go to the hospital during an episode and after several hours, I was put under general anaesthetic and had 2 cardioversions to restore normal sinus rhythm.

I did go to see a cardiologist after this and he reviewed my scans and then also ordered me to have an ultrasound of my heart. My heart was described as 'text book' on the ultrasound and so the cardiologist told me I had SVT. He said it was likely caused by a small extra growth in one of the pathways in my heart that sometimes meant the electrical signals in my heart went around in circles rather than traveling straight, which then caused the tachycardia and abnormal sinus rhythm. He said I could consider ablation or beta blockers but we decided to adopt a wait and see approach - I didn't fancy being on medication for the rest of my life, or running the risk of having to get a pace maker if something went wrong.

Over the years, I've had 1-2 episodes per year and have managed to resolve them all, even if I had to go into hospital, with valsalva maneuvers. This weekend however I had another episode and this time, it wouldn't go away.  

I went into hospital and ultimately they had to give me 6 ml of adenosine (which had no effect) and then 12 ml which finally managed to reset my heart rhythm. Obviously that's an extremely unpleasant drug and so I'd like to avoid ever having to take that again, but what worried me more was that the hospital disagreed with the diagnosis of SVT.

They have instead said they think I have sick sinus tachycardia and a whole bunch of other issues. They said they were worried about "low voltage - precordial leads", consider ischemia - inferior leads. The report also mentions LAE - consider biatrial enlargement.

My HR was between 150-180, RR is 412, PR 166, QRSD 85, QT 272, QTc 424. Axis: P 87, QRS 180, T -45.

I'm going to try make an appointment to see a cardiologist again (can't even remember the name of the last one) but it might take a while to get an appointment. I guess I just wanted to know how concerned I should be. Lately, before the recent episode as well, I had been having strange palpitations when I lie down and almost constant mild pains in my left shoulder/chest/back. I know they are symptoms associated with a heart attack but I am also very anxious about a lot of things at the moment and I know I don't have high cholesterol levels so I figured I can't possibly be at risk of having an actual heart attack. For the most part my heart feels as though it's going too fast (unless it feels normal) but on rare occasions, it does feel like it's beating but not adjusting to the circumstances - ie won't speed up if I jump or run and I get a really uncomfortable pressure/tiredness feeling over my chest. This has always gone away relatively quickly though.

I have never smoked, my bloods came back normal and my thyroid function test was also normal. I have never taken illicit drugs and the only medication I have ever taken is the birth control pill.



Avatar_dr_f_tn
Hi, based on your present clinical symptoms, your doctor may plan for ablation if SVT cannot be controlled with medications. Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is a rapid heart rhythm originating at or above the atrioventricular node. As a result of this rapid rhythm you can have palpitations, dizziness or sometimes chest pain. Many episodes of SVT soon stop on their own, and no treatment is then needed. If they progress, they need to be treated. Please discuss this with your doctor am sure he will provide further assistance. Regards.
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