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Excessive Sleep?
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Excessive Sleep?


Posted by Oscar on July 18, 1999 at 18:35:45
I have had Ideopathic Dialated Cardiomyopathy for the last 5 years or so.  Over this time, with medication, my Ejection Fraction has improved into the normal range.  I continue to have high blood pressure and tychacardia of about 120bpm at rest without medicine.  I'm currently taking 200mg a day Toprol XL and 20mg a day Zestril, and these control those problems.  I do still have a lowered tolerance to exercise however, with some fatigue,  breathlessness, and fast heart rate with exersion.  But, basically I'm feeling much better than when I was first diagnosed (by several cardiologists) with Cardiomyopathy.  I do feel tired most of the time and that is at the root of my questions.  On the weekends I usually sleep a little over 14 hours a night.  This is what I naturally like now.  I don't really have a problem with it, but my family is starting to get worried.  I don't really want to lower my metoprolol dosage, as I feel better than I have felt in years.  At rest, my heart rate is in the 70's now and I can do much more than I used to...  So, is my family just now starting to take my problem seriously, or am I getting too much medicine?  Is this a cause for concern?  Am I sleeping my life away needlessly?
Posted by CCF CARDIO MD - CRC on July 19, 1999 at 10:23:00
If you feel OK during the day and are doing well on the current medication I wouldn't change anything.  Some people need more sleep than others and while 14 hours is on the high side it may be you're just making up for a lack of sleep during the weekdays.
Information provided here is for general educational purposes only. Only your doctor can provide specific diagnoses and treatments. If you would like to be seen at the Cleveland Clinic, please Call 1 - 800 - CCF - CARE for an appointment at Desk F15 with a cardiologist
Posted by Oscar on July 19, 1999 at 20:42:34
Ok, let me ask you this:
In addition, I have only one kidney (other missing at birth).  It functions normally, although I had surgery on it when I was nine.  I regularily take two baby aspirins a day.  Is this a bad idea?  As yet I have no clogged arteries, and I have had all the tests up to persantine/thalium treadmill.  No cath yet  though.  My cardiologist doesn't think one is warranted.  What a guy!  

Posted by CCF CARDIO MD - CRC on July 20, 1999 at 09:55:05
The kidney isn't a problem either way.  The aspirin issue is a bit stickier.  Did your doctor tell you to take the aspirin?  If so I would follow his advice.  The fact is that with idiopathic cardiomyopathy nobody really knows if aspirin helps or harms in the long run.  In particular there is a question about aspirin and ACE inhibitor interaction.
I hope you find this information useful.  Information provided in the heart forum is for general purposes only.  Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies.  Please feel free to write back with additional questions.
If you would like to make an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, please call 1-800-CCF-CARE or inquire online by using the Heart Center website at www.ccf.org/heartcenter.  The Heart Center website contains a directory of the cardiology staff that can be used to select the physician best suited to address your cardiac problem.
Posted by Oscar on July 23, 1999 at 20:54:48
Well, I will discuss the aspirin issue with my cardiologist.  Thanks for the info.  One other medication-related question:
I also take Triavil 2/25 once a day.  I have read that it can cause tachycardia and should be discontinued in arhythmic people.  Although I realize I should talk to my doctors about this issue, what is your advise on this matter?  and...
Since I have what my cardiologist calls "marked resting tachycardia," should I stay away from caffiene?  Is this a black-and-white issue?  Or do some heart patients tolerate moderate caffiene intake?  On a related note - Although I've seldom consumed alcohol in the past, I have found even small amounts of alcohol to be an absolute no-no since developing cardiomyopathy.  One beer and my heart rate went up to 140...that was 2-3 years ago, and I haven't had a drop since.  Is this typical?
I'm sorry I have so many questions...  I do appreciate your helping me with my ongoing education in these matters though.
Posted by CCF CARDIO MD - CRC on July 26, 1999 at 09:39:46
The risk of arrhythmia is small and probably not reason to discontinue if you are tolerating it and it is working.  There are other choices however if your doctor decides to switch you.  I would definately continue to avoid alcohol.  Caffeine may be ok but see how you feel with it.
I hope you find this information useful.  Information provided in the heart forum is for general purposes only.  Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies.  Please feel free to write back with additional questions.
If you would like to make an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, please call 1-800-CCF-CARE or inquire online by using the Heart Center website at www.ccf.org/heartcenter.  The Heart Center website contains a directory of the cardiology staff that can be used to select the physician best suited to address your cardiac problem.
Posted by Oscar on July 26, 1999 at 10:56:19
Ok, one last question...
When the cardiologists found my problems (low EF, etc), it was during a stress/echo test.  Later tests were echocardiograhms.  My cardiologist says that an echo will show the problem the same as a stress/echo, and an echo is all that is necessary.  Is that true?  I've always felt that the stress/echo did a better job of re-creating the problem.
Posted by Maggie Hogan on July 26, 1999 at 21:37:56
I have been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, and now am being tested for sleep apnea.  Have you been told by anyone that you SNORE excessively loudly, or that you sometimes snort or gasp in your sleep (doesn't sound very appealing, I know!)?  I am beginning to suspect that at least part of my constant fatigue is sleep apnea-related, and this can cause or aggravate cardiac conditions.  Just a thought....good luck to you.

Posted by CCF CARDIO MD - CRC on July 27, 1999 at 09:01:11
A regular echo is adequate for follow-up.  The stress echo is more for the diagnosis of blockages in the heart arteries and once these have been excluded does not generally need repeated.  Sleep apnea is another potential cause of ICM and should be ruled out.
I hope you find this information useful.  Information provided in the heart forum is for general purposes only.  Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies.  Please feel free to write back with additional questions.
If you would like to make an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, please call 1-800-CCF-CARE or inquire online by using the Heart Center website at www.ccf.org/heartcenter.  The Heart Center website contains a directory of the cardiology staff that can be used to select the physician best suited to address your cardiac problem.


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