Heart Disease Expert Forum
Heart rate and good or bad on mitral
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding heart issues such as: Angina, Angioplasty, Arrhythmia, Bypass Surgery, Cardiomyopathy, Coronary Artery Disease, Defibrillator, Heart Attack, Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Pacemaker, PAD, Stenosis, Stress Tests.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Heart rate and good or bad on mitral


  Is there a difference between a good and bad slow heart rate?
  One extremely kind and fine heart surgeon remarked to me that
  a slow heart rate is harder on the mitral valve.
  I have been trying to lower my blood pressure and heart rate,
  through some jogging and careful dieting.
  Resting, upon awakening, my heart rate can be as low as 47
  with the pressure around 96/52.  When I stand or sit, the pressure
  goes up.  During the day, the pressure is around 130/80 with
  a heart rate around 60 or so if standing or sitting and a nurse
  is taking my blood pressure.  If I take it, it's often lower
  if calm and at home, around 110/60.  Since jogging and dieting
  to a quite thin frame, I have reduced the difference between
  the systolic and diastolic to about 50 mm of mercury.  At one
  time, it was 65 mm difference, like 115/50 which I found alarming
  owing to the very fine prospective longitudinal study from Paris,
  which I'm sure you know about.
  I noticed a bad or unnatural slowing of the heart rate was when
  I took a herbal preparation, like hawthorne, which stopped
  ny arrhythmias.  I made the mistake of taking 2 capsules and it dropped
  my pressure to 90/60 and even below and I felt quite ill.  This
  I would term an unnatural and dangerous slowing of the heart beat.
  But if jogging, the heart seems to beat slower the next day.
  I gather a slower heart rate allows more, how to say it, back
  flow into the left atrium?
  As you can see from my echo below, I have 50% ejection fraction,
  but that is probably too optimistic, and is closer to 25% because
  of the severe mitral regurgitation?
  My fantasy would be to get the heart as efficient as possible to
  do the miracle of avoiding surgery.
  I can jog slowing, 5 miles or so, at 12 to 13 minutes per mile
  and keep my heart rate around 130 to 150.  I probably cannot
  jog safely under 10 minutes per mile at this point.  If I jog and
  feel any pressure or pain in my head, I stop, since I don't wish
  to risk a stroke with my bad valves.
  Is it possible to have a slower heart rate and it can be a good thing?
  Like a normal and natural, without drugs or herbs, lower blood pressure
  and that can be a very fine thing?
  When I awake with a low heart rate and low blood pressure, I feel
  very, very good as far as symptoms, since I don't have any then.
  Thanks.
  Echo:
  Reason mitral valve prolapse
  Age 54 Height 71 Weight 140#
  M-mode (cms) Ao: 3.2  L.A.: 6.0  LVIDd: 6.6  LVIDs: 4.5
  LA: The left atrium is moderately enlarged.
  LV: The left ventricle is moderate dilated.  Overall left ventricular
  function is midly reduced with left ventricular ejection fraction
  Reason mitral valve prolapse
  Age 54 Height 71 Weight 140#
  M-mode (cms) Ao: 3.2  L.A.: 6.0  LVIDd: 6.6  LVIDs: 4.5
  LA: The left atrium is moderately enlarged.
  LV: The left ventricle is moderate dilated.  Overall left ventricular
  function is midly reduced with left ventricular ejection fraction
  estimated at 50%.  The transmitral Doppler flow profile is normal.
  MV: The mitral valve is moderately thickened with moderate myxomatous
  degeneration and moderate prolapes of the anterior and posterior mitral
  valve leaflets.  There is severe mitral regurgitation.
  AOV: The aortic valve is normal and trileaflet.
  AOR: The aoritc root and ascending aorta are normal.  The transverse
  aorta, descending aorta, and abdominal aorta are not well seen.
  RA: The right atrium is mildly enlarged.
  RV: Right ventricular size, contractile function, and interventricular
  septal motion are normal.
  TV: The tricuspid valve is normal with moderate tricuspid regurgitation.
  The velocity of the tricuspid regurgitation is 2.6 m/s. The pulmonary
  artery systolic presuure is estimated to be 40 mmHZ.  This is assuming a
  right atrial pressure of 12 mmHg.
  PV: The pulmonic valve is now well seen.  There is mild pulmonic
  regurgitation.  The pulmonary artery is normal.
  Other: The pericardium, inferior vena cava, and superior vena cava are
  normal.
  Conclusion: The mitral valve is moderately thickened and redundant with
  prolapse of the anterior and posterior leaflets.  Eccentric jet of severe
  mitral regurgitation.  Left ventricle is dialated with mild global
  reudction in systolic function.  Left atrium is moderately enlarged.
  Right atrium is mildly enlarged.  Moderate to severe tricuspid
  regurgitation.  Moderate pulmonary hypertension.  When compared wtih echo
  report of 3/25/87, mitral regurgitation has worsened.
Related Discussions
238668_tn?1232735930


Dear Adam,
Q: Is there a difference between a good and bad slow heart rate?
A: Thank you for your question.  Heart rate control is due to two influences.  One influences the heart to speed up and the other to slow down.  The "natural" or intrinsic rate of the heart free of all influences (i.e if the heart were placed by itself in a test tube) it about 100 beats per minute (BPM).  The vagus nerve is the "brakes" on the heart.  This nerve is under control of the parasympathetic nervous system (part of the nervous system we don
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank