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I have a EF of 25%
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I have a EF of 25%

I have a ejection fraction of 25%. My doctor has adviced me to stay on bed rest & has given me  medicines. Can some one tell me how can i better my ejection fraction? Can it be improved? I do not have diabetes or cholestrol. Please give me suggestions on how to improve my ejection fraction?
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367994_tn?1304957193
Six years ago, I had a low EF<29%, and increase in heart size, etc.  Whether your EF can be increased depends on the underlying cause that decreases heart wall contractility.  

My left ventricle was increased in size and that caused reduce contractility.  Medication that reduced heart size by lowering the heart's workload. Currently my heart is normal size and EF is normal.

If your heart wall contractility is caused by heart muscle disease or virus, etc. there can be different treatment.
The underlying cause information, that would help provide an answer
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1310285_tn?1274487881
I would question the prescription for bedrest.  My husband was recently hospitalized with heart failure with an EF of 10%.  Once they got the symptoms under control (fuild buildup) they sent him home and said to resume normal activities.  All of our doctors have told him that any exercise he can tolerate is wonderful for his heart.

Also, not sure what medications you were given, but beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are, from what I understand, the key combination of drugs to help improve heart function.

Good luck!
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367994_tn?1304957193
Eperdu has explained it exactly as the experence I had after being in ICU for several days with CHF to stabilize the oxygen ratio within the respiratory system .

The medication (beta blocker and ACE inhibitor) dilates the vessels and when the heart pumps against less resistance there is a reduction of work for the heart, and a weaker heart can often manage the needed blood flow.  Also, there may be digoxin medication to increase the heart's contractility.  My experience the lightened workload for the heart provided time to heal. Depending on the underlying damage to heart cells can be determine months later with the proper therapy function normally or almost normal.
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976897_tn?1379171202
I am curious to know what you actually felt in the way of benefits in yourself as the condition improved. When your EF got to say 35-40% did you notice much difference when it increased from that figure back to normal levels? Did Doctors expect your EF to raise so much?
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367994_tn?1304957193
If an individual's system compensates well there may not be any symptoms until heart failure symptoms. My first symptom was lung congestion.  Also, there is an estimate that about 26% of the heart problem population has an EF< 30%, and go about their daily activities unaware of any problem until silent heart attack. Sometimes when the EF is increased a patient will not feel as well as they did with lower EF.  For how well one feels, that doesn't indicate very much as symptoms may be present or not.

I felt very well the day before CHF, but the inhalation of dust in an environment when I should have been wearing a mask my have triggered the heart attack event.
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976897_tn?1379171202
So would it be fair to say that someone would have to be very physically active to notice a deficit in heart function if their EF was less than say 50%?  I'm just wondering how an average person would know if they have an EF of 30% for example if they have no symptoms. I presume the average person working in an office wouldn't notice much, if anything, but someone heavily into sports will notice a problem quickly? You raised an interesting point when you state "26% of the heart problem population has an EF " because one has to wonder how many people are unaware they have an EF of 30% or less. Quite a frightening thought really.
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367994_tn?1304957193
I agree with your assessment.  I'm sure the type, the degree and rigorousness of activity will break through any compensating factors.  I believe when I exposed myself to a dusty environment compromised my respiratory system causing the heart to be overworked, and the heart wasn't able to withstand the extra stress for a period of time of the exposture.  The heart rate was beating at 115 bpm before and upon going to ER.
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976897_tn?1379171202
So you was in a dusty environment with no filter? was this over several days? What kind of dust was it? I bet you have had many times where you've looked back and wish you had worn a mask with a filter. When you went to hospital, did it take them long to establish your condition and is this experience what caused you to do so much research? the need to know.

Sorry for so many questions, but other peoples experiences are very interesting and a lot can be learned.
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159619_tn?1318997813
I agree, it is very interesting to hear what others went through, what they felt before during and after. Especially for those of us that have been fortunate enough to avoid these issues (knock on wood, tap,tap) as we only read, which  does not really translate into more than a basic understanding. Great stuff, thx for sharing guys.
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976897_tn?1379171202
I had a sleep apnea attack just once after my last stenting. I woke up and I just couldn't seem to get my lungs working for about 30 seconds. I honestly thought I was going to suffocate. So I can imagine how terrible it must feel for people who have lung problems. It's terrifying. I think it takes a strong mind to overcome the anxiety which obviously soon kicks in.
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367994_tn?1304957193
I was sanding sheet rock (the compound for the seams) and it was fine dust. Several days and one night later I had a dry cough and a fast heart rate (115).  I was immediately sent to ER when I told intake I had some shortness of breath.  I don't remember much, it is possible I was given some medication and don't remember that either.  I remember a brief visit from a surgeon (wouldn't operate), seeing chest X-ray, stent implant partially remembered (before, but not during).  ICU to stabalize oxygen level (I believe 92% was acceptable).

Six years ago, I asked a question on this forum if an EF could be increased as the reprort stated I had 13% with cath and 29% with echo?  No one on this forum could answer the question, few answers but not enlighening.  Also, questions regarding enlarged heart and a few of the ladies had answers for that.  I went to another forum for 3 years, researched, read, posted and a friend on that board was very informative. I became interested.
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976897_tn?1379171202
Thank you for sharing. So when you got to hospital the symptoms had basically just begun and they got your oxygen stabilised fairly quickly. Was it the requirement for the stent that caused your heart problems or the period of low oxygen from the lungs or both?  
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367994_tn?1304957193
QUOTE Ed: "So would it be fair to say that someone would have to be very physically active to notice a deficit in heart function if their EF was less than say 50%?  I'm just wondering how an average person would know if they have an EF of 30% for example if they have no symptoms. I presume the average person working in an office wouldn't notice much, if anything, but someone heavily into sports will notice a problem quickly? You raised an interesting point when you state "26% of the heart problem population has an EF " because one has to wonder how many people are unaware they have an EF of 30% or less. Quite a frightening thought really".

>>>>According to my hospital report (ER), I only had mild edema...notice the problem lying down otherwise OK.  Oxygen infusion was the last procedure done prior to my discharge.

>>It seems the 26% of heart problem population without knowing they have a heart problem is a correlation and possibly other data that  one-in-four  of that population have a silent heart attack. Not always but a large fraction of those that have had a slilent heart attack may have had silent ischemia. I postulated that angina and silent ischemia cause less tolerant heart cells to become dormant (hybernation) and/or necrotic.  There are millions of heart cells so it may take several years for hypokinesis and/or akinesis and low cardiac output (EF). Not unlike TIAs of the brain.

I differentiate heart failure range (<29%) as this percent is generally recognized by the health community and insurance policy holders etc., and that of being in heart failure mode.  Heart failure mode would be the heart's functionality, a condtion where the heart pumps less oxygenated blood into circulation than received from the lungs.  This causes congested heart failure, and/or cardiac arrest.

Heart failure can also cause the left ventricle to enlarge (compensate) and that can cause an arrhythmia.  There appears to be a distinction between a pathological enlarged heart and that of an athlete's enlarge left ventricle (the difference is the heart cells).  When the athlete discontinues the exertion program the LV returns to normal size.  The pathologically enlarged heart can sometimes be resized (reverse remodeling) by reducing the heart's workload.
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