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Mild Tricuspid Regurgitation?
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Mild Tricuspid Regurgitation?

I am a 17 y/o female, non-smoker, healthy weight, fairly regular physical activity.
After a doctor heard a murmur, I had an echo that came back with everything fine except mild-moderate tricuspid regurgitation. There were no other leaks, nothing was enlarged etc. All the places where I read about it refer to it being caused by infection (fairly certain I didn't have) or enlargement somewhere else in the heart, which I don't have either. Has anyone experienced anything similar to this? I have an appointment with the specialist next week and I'm curious as to what they'll say. I wasn't able to find much information about an audible murmur w/ tricupsid regurgitation that I fit the symptoms or causes for.

Also, could this type of regurgitation have to do with connective tissue syndromes, such as EDS? I'm in the process of getting tested for this at the moment.

Thanks for your help.
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Tricuspid regurgitation in adults is most commonly caused by enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle. It is less commonly caused by a specific problem with the tricuspid valve. Infection of the heart valve (endocarditis, rheumatic fever) and coronary artery disease affecting the right ventricle can also cause tricuspid regurgitation.

Symptoms with tricuspid regurgitation are quite variable and some people with severe tricuspid regurgitation remain asymptomatic for many years.

Diseases that cause elevated pressures in your lungs can also lead to enlargement of the right side of the heart and tricuspid regurgitation.

It is reasonable to see a specialist. It sounds as if you have no symptoms. If you do have significant tricuspid regurgitation that is causing symptoms, the first step would be to determine the underlying cause. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is not commonly associated with tricuspid regurgitation.
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