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PFO closure
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PFO closure

I had a TIA almost 1 year ago, I was 42. After many tests they found that I have a PFO and I also had a DVT in my right calf. They started me on Warfarin, baby aspirin, Lipitor and Lisinopril just for precaution. The DVT has since dissolved.
I recently received an e-mail with the results of my last echo which stated:
The visually estimated ejection fraction is 60%.
The right ventricle is mildly enlarged.
There is evidence of an atrial septal aneurysm.
The right atrium is mildly enlarged.
There is a trace of mitral regurgitation.
There is moderate to severe tricuspid regurgitation.
There is a trace pulmonic regurgitation.
The right ventricular systolic pressure is calculated at 42 mmHg.
I have not heard from my Cardiologist yet, (left many messages), and I'm concerned. Should I request to have the PFO Closure or are my results not of great concern? Any help you can offer is greatly appreciated.  Thank you
Avatar_dr_m_tn
Dear cara626

it is hard to give you an accurate assessment of situation without personally meeting you and reviewing your echocardiogram but I will give you some helpful information.

Without looking at your echocardiogram, it is hard to tell you if you indeed have a PFO. I suspect that you have a condition called atrial septal defect which refers to a larger communication between the left and the right side of the heart.
The reason I say that is due to the fact that the right side of your heart has now started showing signs of "overload"
That being said, I think that there does not appear to be an irreversible change or damage to your heart muscle.
I would suggest that you follow up with a cardiologist who specializes in the treatment of these disorders (like a structural heart disease specialist) who will be able to determine a management/ referral plan.
You are welcome to follow up at the Cleveland Clinic as we have several cardiologists who specialize in the treatment of this condition.

Hope that helps

CCFHeartMD19
3 Comments
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Avatar_m_tn
Thank you...I do infact have a PFO, they did a "bubble test" while I was in the hospital and shortly after my release I had a TEE done, both tests did show the PFO. When you say my heart is showing signs of "overload", what does that mean? I get winded quite often and I can feel the strong beat of my heart...at times it seems like you could see how hard it is beating. I have no family history of PFO's, DVT's or strokes in my family so all these changes have reallygotten me scared. Thank you for your response, hopefully my cardiologist will call me soon with his decisions.
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Avatar_dr_m_tn
Overload refers to the fact there is blood flowing from left side to the right side of the heart through the abnormal connection (PFO) leading to an extra burden on the right side of your heart.
It is uncommon to have left to right flows through a PFO (generally they are right to left) but certainly a possibility, but it is hard for me to tell you that with definite certainty without looking at your TEE/ echo pictures.
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