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Re: Syncope,Migraine Syndrome and Family Hx Long Q T Syndrome
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Re: Syncope,Migraine Syndrome and Family Hx Long Q T Syndrome

Posted By Kathy on June 17, 1999 at 14:17:58
I have an 8 year old son who has in the last year had 1 syncopal incident and has recently been experiencing migraine headaches. He has a postive family hx ( 1st cousin) of Long Q T Syndrome. He is presently being monitored re LQTS and shows some T ( biphasic) wave alterations with occassional coupling of premature venticular beats the QT interval within Normal ranges. The males in his paternal family have a multitude of cardiac conduction problems and his father has Left bundle branch blockage and Left Ventrical Myopathy ( ? genetic)there is also  AFIB, along with  strong lipid related disorders. His father and uncles have all suffered Cardiac arrest between ages of 20-40. With one incident of dizziness and sudden cardiac death at age 48. I am very concerned with this recent development of Migraines and feel that he should be undergo a full Cardiac evaluation again along with a Neuro assessment. Can Migraines be a symptom of cardiac problems or am I off in my thinking?????




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Posted By CCF CARDIO MD JMF on June 17, 1999 at 14:51:06
Dear Kathy,
Thank you for your question.  I would discuss this issue with the physician taking care of your son or a pediatric cardiologist.  It is important to delineate the cardiac conditions that are affecting your son.  He may in fact have other risks for cardiac disease given your very strong family history.  Migraines are caused by changes in blood vessels ( dilation in particular) and may represent vasomotor abnormalities in your son.  This sounds like a complex medical situation and I would recommend consultation with an expert.
I hope this has been useful. I wish you the best of luck. Feel free to write back.
Information provided here is for general purposes only. Specific questions should be addressed to your own doctor. If you would like
to make an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, please call 1-800-CCF-CARE or inquire online by using the Heart
Center website at www.ccf.org/heartcenter. The Heart Center website contains a directory of the cardiology staff that can be used
to select the physician best suited to address your cardiac problem.





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Posted By Peter Winstanley on June 28, 1999 at 07:04:42
I too have a 8 year old son and a 12 year old daughter, both diagnosed as having a "Suspected Prolonged QT Syndrome".  My son had one fainting episode in a swimming pool but my daughter has had no symptoms whatsoever.  They are both being treated with a beta-blocker and have since shown no symptoms at all.
I am finding information very hard to come by can you help or point me in the right direction ?  Also I have been advised not to let either of them go swimming.  Is this correct or are we being over cautious ?
Both children enjoy a active lifestyle, including playing Football, Cricket, Badminton etc




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Posted By CCF CARDIO MD JMF on July 09, 1999 at 14:33:18
Dear Peter,
Thank you for your question.  I am happy to hear that your children are doing well on medication and have had no further episodes.  I would probably recommend that they could perform these activities while supervised, but you should discuss this with your physician.  Particularly swimming.  You might also consider a ambulatory monitor such as a King of Hearts to determine the exact amount of arrhythmia that they are having.

Information provided here is for general educational purposes only. Only your doctor can provide specific diagnoses and
treatments. If you would like to be seen at the Cleveland Clinic, please Call 1 - 800 - CCF - CARE for an appointment at
Desk F15 with a cardiologist





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Posted By Kathy  on July 27, 1999 at 14:59:02
Thank you for your response to my question
My son has undergone some testing and most recent EKG has come back with a Dx of borderline prolonged Q T Interval.. QTc 45.1 ms... of course the ever present  biphasic T waves and sinus arrhythmia.. We are presently in the process of once again making arrangments for full testing..
I am certainly concerned as the age increases so do the changes appear his QTc prior to this was within 40.0 - 43.0 ms I am of the mind to strongly request starting the beta blocker therapy.. In the past it has been a wait and see attitude with the Cardiologists we have been dealing with unfortunately we are quite a distance from any major centres and the lack of awareness is a constant factor in our healthcare community..I now have concerns with his younger sister age 6 yrs  of 5 (ages 6 to 22 years) children only these two display any abnormalities on testing.. Anything you might offer to take with me to upcoming consultations and testing would be greatly appreciated..











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