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Re: Tricuspid regurgitation
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Re: Tricuspid regurgitation

Posted By CCF CARDIO MD - MTR on March 24, 1999 at 00:09:18:

In Reply to: Tricuspid regurgitation posted by Kelly on March 23, 1999 at 11:43:27:






Dear Dr.:
Last July I had an echocardiogram and was told I had mild mitral valve prolapse.  I was experiencing forceful heartbeats in the middle of the night that would awaken me along with a smothering sensation.  Sometimes it would take an hour before the shortness of breath completely ceased.  My Dr. thought I might also have asthma as my lung capacity was only 40% on his machine in his office, however, I have never had any wheezing or systems of asthma in the past, and there is no family history of asthma.  Also ocassionally I would get a feeling of a lot of liquid in my chest and would get the sensation of it sloshing around when I walked.  I also have a history of high cholesterol which the total was 357 in June of 98 and am taking 80 mg Zocor daily plus .25 Lanoxin for palpitations.  My total cholesterol was down to 188 in December of 98.  Just for curiousity I recently obtained a copy of the echocardiogram report which stated as follows:
M-mode measurements were left atrium 3.4 cm, right ventricle 1.1 cm, ventricular septal thickness .96 cm, LV posterior wall thickness .92 cm, mitral valve amplitude 1.7 cm, E/F slope greater than 70, aortic valve closure 1.8 cm, LV internal dimensions systolic 2.8 cm, LV internal dimensions diastolic 4.4 cm, aortic root 2.9 cm.  Estimated ejection fraction is normal at greater than 55%.  Cardiac Doppler info:  Aortic valve velocity 1.34 meters per second and there was no regurgitation, mitral valve velocity .88 meters per second and there was trace regurgitation, pulmonic valve velocity 1.21 meters per second and there was trace regurgitation, tricuspid valve velocity .74 meters per second and there was regurgitation with the regurgitant jet being 1.54 meters per second.  Wall motion was normal.  Chamber size was normal.  Wall thickness was normal.  Valve motion showed mild mitral valve prolapse.  There was no fluid collections.  There was no masses.  Assessment:  1)Mitral valve prolapse, mild; 2) Trace mitral regurgitation; 3) Trace pulmonic regurgitation; 4) Tricuspid regurgitation; 5) Normal wall motion; 6) Normal wall thickness.  
I was suprised to learn I had Tricuspid regurgitation, I was never informed of this.  My questions are what is it, how dangerous is it, is it mild or severe, should it be corrected and was I born with it?  I have not been in any major auto accidents or anything of that sort.  Also I am a 30 year old female and am getting married in January.  We plan to have a child in approximately two years, is there any danger in becoming pregnant with this condition?  If this condition isn't treated is it potentially life threatening?    
Thank you for your time.




Dear Kelly, thank you for your question.  I suspect that you don't have a serious problem.  With an echocardiogram, mild valvular regurgitation can be seen that is a normal variant.  Sometime, valvular regurgitation is overestimated on an echo.  Even if you have mild tricuspid regurgitation, there should be nothing to worry about because this condition will not be life threatening and will not interfere with expected pregnancies.  I suggest that you have a repeat echocardiogram to clear up the confusion.  I suspect that your tricuspid valve will be fine.  
I hope you find this information useful.  Information provided in the heart forum is for general purposes only.  Only your physician can provide specific diagnoses and therapies. Please feel free to write back with additional questions.  Good luck!
If you would like to make an appointment at the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, please call 1-800-CCF-CARE or inquire online by using the Heart Center website at www.ccf.org/heartcenter.   The Heart
Center website contains a directory of the cardiology staff that can be used to select the physician best suited to address your cardiac problem.

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