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Wolfe-Parkinson-White Syndrome
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Wolfe-Parkinson-White Syndrome

Today, my husband, aged 47, received the results of a holter monitor test, ECG, and stress test from his family doctor. The stress test was fine. The ECG stated: HR: 82 BPM., normal sinus rhythm, short PR interval possibly Wolfe-Parkinson-White syndrome. The Holter Monitor Data stated: Normal sinus rhythm with heart rated between 55-163 BPM with an average rate of 104BPM. There was a 5.5 hour long episode of sustained atrial fibrillation with QRS varying slightly. The maximum beat rate was 205BPM. There were 388 ventricular premature beats of which there was one ventricular couplet. There were 496 atrial premature beats of which there was 7 atrial couplets. There were 3 short non-sustained runs of supraventricular tachycardia, the longest being 18 beats at a rate of 205 BPM. There were no pauses or ST depression. There were no recorded symptoms.
My husband has an appointment with a cardiologist on 21 January 2000. I have three questions. First, is it OK(safe) for him to wait that long. (I am very worried). Second, does the Holter Monitor further confirm WPW or does it also indicate additional problems. Third, should my teenage children be checked for WPW. My husband's father and uncle both died from undiagonosed heart problems in their 50's. PS We live in Canada.
Many thanks, Sib
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Thanks for your questions.

#1) It is probably OK to wait.  Of course if there are any problems you should call and try to get an earlier appointment or go to the emergency room.

#2) I would be suspect of any diagnosis of WPW from a short PR interval on the Holter monitor test.

#3) Not at this point.
13 Comments
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I have a friend who has just been diagnoised with Wolf
Parkison White Syndrome.  I would like to know what causes this
disease. As well as everythng that I would need to know to comfort my friend.
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Avatar_n_tn
I have a friend who has just been diagnoised with Wolf
Parkison White Syndrome.  I would like to know what causes this
disease. As well as everythng that I would need to know to comfort my friend.
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Avatar_n_tn
Ny dayghter-in-law had surgery for WPW 2 years ago and occasionally still experiences ache in the heart area.  This is not associated directly with any activity, although she has a 2-1/2 year old and a 3 month old baby.  Her cardiologist recommends Motrin, which helps, but my question is should she still be experiencing pain 2 years after the procedure at the Lahey Clinic in Boston.  She is told it is muscular or scar tissue that is causing this occasional ache.  Can you normalize this for her? She is frantic with worry and is only being told, to not worry, but no reasonable explanation for pain.  Does everyone get this?  She would feel better if she knew it was a common side effect.  Thank you
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Avatar_n_tn
My mother has been living with WPW for years now but doctors have not been able to give her any information on exactly what the desease is, how it started, or what to expect of it in the future.  She is in constant worry of what it is capable of doing to her and since her diognostic, has become a hypocondriac.  If you have any information on WPW, it would be greatly appreciated.  Thanx
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi, I'm from Canberra Australia.
I was diagnosed with WPWS in 1985 at the age of 13 after years of medication and tests.  I had a successful ablation in 1986.  Since then I have only slight increases in heartbeat on rare occasions and inflammation in residual scar tissue when I am tired and stressed.  Whilst this can be quite painful it can be controlled by lifestyle practise and I even had cortisone injections a few years ago to assist its recovery.  I am now 27 and live a happy and healthy life.  I know that the idea of treatment can be frightening but on Doctor's advice I would recommend it to anyone being offered it.  To date no one else in my family has been diagnosed with WPWS.  Hope this helps someone who is just encoutering WPWS now.
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Avatar_n_tn
I have been suffering with what I think is WPW....I went to my cardiologist and he called it pre excitement syndrome...this is after a useless trip to my doctor first who told me I had a silent heart attack..then he could not tell me what the vibrating was...he said take a baby aspirin a day, thats all he wrote...so the cardo seems to get it?....Im currently fighting with the Ins. co. over paying for an event recorder, which gives him a months  worth of episodes...if I have them?....they come and go....since I have been online, and especially this site I really have gotten a lot of info....now I know it has a name....WPW, and I know about the treatment called a radiofrequency ablation....if this is truly what I have? My cardo said I was born with this and that I have an extra nerve in my heart, which causes this extra electrical signal to the heart chamber etc. so I have a lot to learn yet before I do  anything......Good Luck to all!!!
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My 11 year old healthy, active daughter was recently diagnosed with WPW, after three episodes of rapid (120-200bpm) heart rate brought on by surprise or exertion over several months last summer.  The EP at Boston Children's recommended watching her for more episodes, as the ones she had already had did not result in fainting and did stop immediately when she lay down.  She was also advised to eliminate caffeine and chocolate from her diet.  We are at the point now of discussing beta blockers since she has had two additional episodes in three months.  She's had several event monitors, an echocardiogram, and a stress EKG.  Her heart is otherwise sound.  The EP said that by looking at her EKG, he could estimate the approx. location of the extra nerve pathway as being close to her AV node, making the ablation route something I'd rather shy away from at this point.  My question is about the beta blockers.  The specialists seem to be in agreement about trying Atenolol, but my pcp has cautioned me about the drawbacks of its use, particularly in regard to its affect on the AV node itself and on the routine increase of the heart's rate.  Can you give me a risk/benefit analysis?  Thank you so much!!
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My daughter, age 43, is about to have electropysiologic testing and ablation of the extra bundle (s)associated with WPW.

I would appreciate knowing the possibilities of both success and adverse outcomes for relieving the condition.
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The anestesiologist for my 24 year old brother, during orthoscopic surgery on his knee, noticed that his heartbeat looked like it was WPW. My brother has said since he was a child that he has had spells when his heart beats too fast, but it was never looked into. This is the first I've ever heard about WPW- what is it? and how serious is it?
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I've had confirmed WPW with regularly recurring tachycardias since before I was born (they thought I was twins) I'm now 42. I understand from the records that my parents kept that I was THE textbook case for neonatal and infant Tachycardia and WPW treatment.  Throughout my preteen and puberty years I used to take massive doses of Digitalis and Digoxin.  Once I passed through puberty, however, the incidence of tachycardia reduced to nearly zero.  In the last ten years I've had three.  I have to admit, however, that the last one scared me as it lasted for over three hours.  I was out of the country and away from substantive medical attention.  I have discovered through the years though that with a calm and quiet enough environment and enough concentration I can usually coax my heart into converting on its own with breath control and (believe it or not, standing on my head).  (Not that I would recomend anyone having their first, second, third, or fourth to try that).
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi,

I have been diagnosed with WPW since I was 1 year old (1977), and the WPW was surpressed by a medicine that I used to take daily till I was 12 years old or so, because the doctors told us that the disease had calmed down, after not having "an attack" of serious fast hartbeats for several years, I suddenly collapsed on the football pitch when I was 13, and was rushed into hospital, where they had to drug me for a 3 weeks till the performed open heart surgery on me, by cutting in the nerve, because scartissue does not conduct. This has cured me completely.
The only thing tah worries me is the medicine that I took for almost 12 years, I still think that I am suffering from the use-->tiredness, light depressions, etc... I don't know what the drug was that they gave me, but I remember it tastes very sweet.
Could anyone tell me something bout the drug that they have given  me for all these years?

Thanks,
Andre
The Netherlands, Europe
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi form the Netherlands europe.
I have been diagnosed with WPW since I was 1 year old, and had open heart surgery when I was 14 that cured me.
All that time before I have been on medicine daily, ccan't remember what it is, but it tasted sweet, and I used to like taking when I was a kid.
No I am worried that these medicine still give me side effects, as I always am very very tired, and also look very tired while I really get enough sleep. Could someone tell me what medicine they gave me, and if there are side effect known?

Thank

Andre
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