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coumadin vs, aspirin for atrial fibrillation
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coumadin vs, aspirin for atrial fibrillation

in the absence of risk factors other than age [71], what are the pros & cons regarding taking coumadin vs. aspirin for paroxysmal atrial fib.  rate is controlled 90% of the time with digoxin and cardizem.  


This discussion is related to Coumadin Guidelines.
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329165_tn?1385201516
Coumadin is an anti-cougulant and asprin is just a blood thinner.  Cardio's prefer to prescribe the anti-cougulants as you are at risk for a Stroke with atrial-fib.

one disadvantage of the Coumadin is that you have to manage your INR levels carefully... that makes life a bit interesing when you have to go for ops, etc. and please ALWAYS mention it to your care-givers that you are using Coumadin.
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367994_tn?1304957193
Coumadin is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). It reduces the formation of blood clots. It works by blocking the synthesis of certain clotting factors. Without these clotting factors, blood clots are unable to form.

Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries.

Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risks
Is an aspirin a day the right thing for you? It's not as easy a decision as it sounds. Know the benefits and risks before considering daily aspirin therapy.
Daily aspirin therapy helps lower the risk of heart attack and stroke, but daily aspirin therapy isn't appropriate for everyone. Is it right for you?

You should consider daily aspirin therapy only if you've had a heart attack or stroke, or you're at high risk of either. And then, proceed only with your doctor's approval. Although taking an occasional aspirin or two is safe for most adults to use for headaches, body aches or fever, daily use of aspirin can have serious side effects.

How does aspirin prevent a heart attack or stroke?
Aspirin interferes with your blood's clotting action. When you bleed, your blood's clotting cells, called platelets, accumulate at the site of your wound. The platelets help form a plug that seals the opening in your blood vessel to stop bleeding.

But this clotting can also happen within the vessels that supply your heart and brain with blood. If your blood vessels are already narrowed from atherosclerosis — the accumulation of fatty deposits in your arteries — a blood clot can quickly form and block the artery. This prevents blood flow to the heart or brain and causes a heart attack or stroke. Aspirin therapy reduces the clumping action of platelets — possibly preventing heart attack and stroke.

Both medications affect platelette formation (anti-coagulant).  The sensitivities of the patient are the considrations for which to use.  I don't believe either anti-coangulants thin the blood...according to my doctor.  If they were blood thinners, blood flow threw occlusions would be enhanced and no angina.
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439464_tn?1213831234
My mom - age 79 was put on Coumadin for A-fib. Unfortunately, she developed Coumadin induced tissue necrosis (gangrene).  All the leg tissue from her knee to her ankle fell off. This is a VERY rare side effect.  After, she was told she could never take Coumadin again.  She was placed on Persantine (This medication is used in combination with "blood thinners"  to keep clots from forming after heart valve replacements. Dipyridamole (Persantine)  belongs to a class of drugs known as platelet inhibitors. It helps to keep blood flowing by stopping platelets from clumping together and by keeping heart blood vessels open.) and a combination of 2 baby aspirin in the morning and 2 baby aspirin in the evening. This drug is basically equivalent to Plavix - but much cheaper to buy. Of course, you really need to discuss all medications with your physician and determine the risks and benefits to you.
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Avatar_m_tn
Coumadin is one of the all-time worst "hangovers" from the "heyday" of patent medications: No matter how many alternatives there are for it, it just won't go away. It certainly thins the blood, but it does so by "poisoning and killing off" the vitamin K in your body. Over enough time, the near-total lack of vitamin K will (not "could" -- WILL) cause osteoporosis, arterial calcification, cognitive malfunction, and many, many other problems.

Unfortunately, clinical studies are expensive ventures, and unless there's a patented substance that has enormous profit potential on the other end of all that pricey research, no one is willing to fork over the money to conduct one. And since vitamins, minerals, and nutrients can't be patented, there just aren't any double-blind, placebo-controlled studies to "prove" how well they can work to replace patent medications (like Coumadin) -- without all the negative side effects associated with those patented substances.

But even without the clinical studies to "back it up," there is a very good alternative to Coumadin  with great success, and it just so happens to be the same supplement used with such great success for RA in the study mentioned in the article above: Cod liver oil or any good fish oil.( I use Carlson fish oil lemon flavor )

Cod liver and other fish oils work by making platelets (the very small element in your blood essential to the clotting process) so slippery that they can't stick together easily to form a clot.

There is a test (called the "platelet aggregation test") that can measure how well your blood is responding to all the natural anti-clotting measures you're already taking, and help you and your doctor determine exactly how much cod liver (or other fish) oil to take. But, unfortunately, it's hard to find and expensive--usually $200-$400 each time. That's why NO ONE TAKING ASPIRIN AS A BLOOD THINNER IS EVER TESTED TO SEE IF THE ASPIRIN IS ACTUALLY DOING ITS JOB. However, 2 to 3 tablespoonfuls of fish oil daily were always enough -- and not too much -- to do the job.

Remember: Whenever you take supplemental oils or essential fatty acids, always take extra vitamin E, as mixed tocopherols, to prevent the oils from oxidizing too rapidly in your body. Take 800-1,000 IU of vitamin E with 2 to 3 tablespoons of fish oil each day. And to minimize any gastrointestinal upset, split the cod liver oil into two or three doses.
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367994_tn?1304957193
The so-called blood thinner, also called an anti-coagulant are terms used interchangeably and the med in this context is to stop platelet formation...the cells in blood plasma from forming clots. They are most used in those who are at risk for heart attack, stroke, or aneurisms. A "blood thinner" can be composed of several different chemical formations. The most common blood thinner, and most often used is aspirin, taken in doses of 81mg per day, essentially one baby aspirin.

The distinction between "blood anti-coagulant" and a "blood thinner" is zip when relating to viscosity (the usual meaning of thinning a fluid ie physics is the degree of a resistance flow under applied force). If blood viscosity (thinning) were true then there would be less resistence against the friction of the artery walls and very quickly reduce systolic pressure and even pass through narrow openings. The subject discussed is anti-clotting and that relates specifically with impeding platelet formation and all so-called "blood thinners" are anti-coangulants and that includes plavix, aspirin, warfin, etc.

Plavix and aspirin are recommended subsequent to a stent implant and both are called "blood thinners" but plavix has a somewhat different mechanism to prevent anti-clotting.  Warifin is a strong anti-clotting (blood thinner) and the natural intake of postassium can increase the strength with unfavorable side-effects.  Dosage and what anti-clotting is patient dependant.

Comment was made aspirin as a "blood thinner"  is never tested "if its doing its job".  I don't believe there is a test for viscosity of blood, but the prothrombin time  of aspirin can be measured  and the derived measure of prothrombin ratio  and international normalized ratio (INR) are measures of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. They are used to determine the clotting tendency of blood, in the measure of PT in warifarin, aspirin,  plavix, etc. The reference range for prothrombin time is usually around 12-15 seconds; the normal range for the INR is 0.8-1.2. PT.
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Avatar_f_tn
thank you so much for your intelligent comments and discussiom on :blood thinning".
it is not that easy a decision to make at this age.  in the absense of athersclerosis
& other risk factors  including a 0 hs-CRP my first thought is ----first do no harm !
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Avatar_m_tn
Aspirin is a formerly patented molecule never found in the human body. Any good it will do will be offset by side effects. Researchers reported  specific long term hazard of aspirin use: Greater risk of pancreatic cancer. that type of cancer is the toughest there is. survival is close to zero.
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Avatar_n_tn
Can I just take the fish oil capsules instead of the liquid? Wouldn't they do the same thing?
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