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inferior infarction
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inferior infarction

I had a 2-minute episode of not  being able to articulate my words clearly.  I knew what I wanted to say, but just couldn't get it out.  No slurring, no severe headache, no staggering -- just difficulty speaking.  When it was over, no problems, and none since.  However, an ekg showed a "inferior infarction."  I anticipate more tests, but what exactly is an inferior infarction?


This discussion is related to What is Inferior Infarct?.
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Essentially we have two unrelated problems, that probably have linkage. "Not being able to articulate words" suggests a neurological deficit, most likely due to a lack of oxygen to a specific part of the brain.

The bottom portion of the ventricle is the "inferior" portion. Inferior leads II, III and F are called the inferior leads because they show electrical activity passing through the diaphragmatic surface of the heart. Irregularities on this surface signify an "inferior infarct". One can have damage in different areas of the heart. The term "infarct" means there is evidence of tissue death, however there are "infarcts" and "infarcts". In other words the degree of damage may vary significantly from patient to patient. An infarct develops when the tissue is deprived of sufficient oxygen for a certain period time, called the warm ischemic time. Infarcts are not the end of the world, however they disrupt the electrical signal from the atrial pacemaker. The means the heart may beat irregularly, or if the infarct extends, there may be insufficient signal to signal a contraction. Insofar at the neurological deficit goes an MRA is indicated. This is a dye-contrast MRI. There are some color graphics on the net elsewhere that will help you visualize exactly where the parts of the heart are. Cutting to the chase, it appears you have had (a) what is called a myocardial infarct and (2) a transient ischemic attack, "rule out stroke". The TIA could have developed from a simple clot secondary to dehydration, or a spasm of a blood vessel due to something as simple as low calcium or vitamin D3. You need an in-person evaluation by two specialties. (a) a neurologist and (b) a cardiologist.
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