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mild mitral valve regurgitation
What is the prognosis for longevitiy of a 67 year old woman if one has a healthy heart but has very mild mitral valve and tricuspid regurgitation?  If the person's body remains healthy, and blood pressure is around 130/78 with cholesterol of 230 can the heart remain healthy for the next 25 or so years?  What can that person expect in their remaining lifespan regarding the functioning of their heart?


This discussion is related to Life Expectancy of St. Jude Valve.
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367994 tn?1304957193
I have had moderate to severe mital valve regurgitation for more than 8 years and my research on the subject indicates from all statistical evidence and evaluated by the medical community that an untreated valve disorder shortens one's life...but having corrective surgery one can go on to a normal lifespan.

Mild, trival, minor heart leakage is not considered medically significant and almost never progresses or cause symptopms.  That should not have anything to do with your lifespan, and having said that does your high cholesterol (normal less than 200) have your doctor's attention?  Your blood pressure indicates a good cardiovascular system especially if you are not on medication!  You will probably live many more years without any medical issues.

Thanks for sharing, take care,

Ken.  
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At least as long as I have so far. I have the same problems, but total Cholesterol of 262 (at last count) and mild mitral valve and tricuspid regurgitation. I am 75, have a high Calcium score and refused to take any more Statins. Check back with me in 10 years.
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159619 tn?1318997813
As Ken has stated, your valves are really not an issue nor is you BP. You cholesterol may not be an issue either depending on the breakdown. For instance, is you number high because you HDL is high? A total cholesterol of 230 is not that far out of whack for some one 67 years of age unless you have a very high LDL, over 130. Lifestyle changes are most likely enough to get it back in line. Exercise as directed by your doctor and cut out all processed foods and empty carbs like breads, pastas and sugars and your numbers should come down.

Good luck!

Jon
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976897 tn?1379171202
A mild leak in the tricuspid valve is so common that you could really class this as normal.
The Mitral valve is one to keep an eye on, well your heart management team should. I've just finished reading some interesting European papers on Mitral valve management, and protocols have been changed in management. From lots of gathered data, progression from mild to moderate is slow. However, there have been many cases where progression from moderate to severe have occurred in just six months and in some of those cases the left ventricle has begun to adapt (enlarge). If the left ventricle enlarges enough, the orifice where the valve is situated can be squashed out of shape making matters chronic. Surgery, as in ballooning the orifice and valve replacement, has failed in a number of cases where the orifice, returning back to original size/shape, has caused further leaks. It has been strongly emphasised that surgery occurs BEFORE severe is reached, meaning more frequent scans. You are still in the mild stage, along with around 20% of the population over 55 years old, and with correct management there is no reason why your longevity should be altered. Just insist that your Cardiologist/Doctor keep an eye on you. There is also the good possibility that your valve will not get any worse anyway, but to be on the safe side, management is vital.
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367994 tn?1304957193
Before commenting with a general statement it has to represent the stage and underlying cause of Mitral regurgitation that are acute, chronic compensated, and chronic decompensated...."If the patient tolerates the acute phase, the chronic compensated phase begins. The CHRONIC compensated phase results in eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy. The combination of increased preload and hypertrophy produces increased end-diastolic volumes, which, over time, result in left ventricular muscle dysfunction. This muscle dysfunction impairs the emptying of the ventricle during systole. Therefore, regurgitant volume and left atrial pressures increase, leading to pulmonary congestion".

Trace, minor, mild classification does not generally progress but obviously it should be watched...that is common sense.  As one of the responders has said in the past it is so common it shouldn't even be mentioned.  I agree with that!

Regarding enlargement of  LV chamber it is the left atrium enlargement well before LV enlargement due to the volume overload (back flow) that causes enlargement of LA allowing the filling pressure in the left atrium to decrease...this almost always occurs with chronic MVR. Left ventricle may increase in size due to chronic low cardiac output with moderate to severe MVR, but there would be other symptoms such as shortness of breath, possible chest pain, etc.    

**Secondary to an enlarged heart (LV) there can be MVR.  The enlargement can deform the configuration of the valve opening, stretch or reduce length of the chordae tendinea, etc.  My enlarged left ventricle caused MVR and there was some expection with treatment for the enlarged LV (reduce heart's workload) there may be relief if LV reverses the remodeling ..didn't happen.

When mild, mitral valve regurgitation may not progress and never pose a serious threat to your health. But when severe, mitral valve regurgitation may cause heart complications and may require surgery to correct. Many sources but...

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mitral-valve-regurgitation/DS00421/DSECTION=symptoms.

"If the patient tolerates the acute phase, the chronic compensated phase begins. The chronic compensated phase results in eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy. The combination of increased preload and hypertrophy produces increased end-diastolic volumes, which, over time, result in left ventricular muscle dysfunction. This muscle dysfunction impairs the emptying of the ventricle during systole. Therefore, regurgitant volume and left atrial pressures increase, leading to pulmonary congestion".

Ken



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