Heart Disease Expert Forum
valve replacement and sexual dysfunction
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding heart issues such as: Angina, Angioplasty, Arrhythmia, Bypass Surgery, Cardiomyopathy, Coronary Artery Disease, Defibrillator, Heart Attack, Heart Disease, High Blood Pressure, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Pacemaker, PAD, Stenosis, Stress Tests.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

valve replacement and sexual dysfunction

  My partner has just undergone surgery for a (mechanical) valve replacement and aortic root repair. The problem was first discovered after what turned out to be an anuerysm (almost 2 years earlier). Shortly after the aneur. he became increasingly disinterested in sex and after a year was unable to maintain an erection .
  I understand the psycological trauma of the events but wonder how much of this sexual dysfunction can be attributed to the heart's weakness and if any, can he expect to regain normal sexual function after this surgery?
  note:He began taking Metaprolol right after said aneur. and is now taking this to regulate the heart rate... (also coumadin) Is impotence an anticipated side effect?
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
_
Dear PBS, thank you for your question.  Impotence can frequently occur after major cardiac surgery due to the trauma of the surgery, the extended recuperation period, and sometimes, a weak heart.  Without more information, I can't comment on whether your partner's heart is weakened now.  However, impotence is a known side effect of beta blockers.  Beta blockers are used to control the heart rate and blood pressure in patients with aneurysms and in patients after aneurysm repairs.   These beneficial effects of beta blockers are utilized to prevent an aortic dissection (tear in the wall of the aorta) from occuring.   Coumadin is not known to cause impotence.  Thus, your partner may need to be on beta-blockers chronically for his cardiovascular health.  However, there may a solution here.  Now, we have Viagra which is used to help stimulate blood flow to the penis in men who have difficulty maintaining an erection.  But, Viagra doesn't stimulate arousal; that has to occur naturally.  I think the next step would be for your partner to discuss these issues with his cardiologist who can then refer him to a urologist who specializes in treating impotency.   A complete urological evaluation may be necessary before trying Viagra. The urologist would better be able to comment on the likelihood that he can regain normal sexual function.   I hope you find this information useful.
Information provided in the heart forum is for general purposes only.   Specific diagnoses and therapies can only be provided by your physician.

  




Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank