Heart Rhythm Community
Fast pulse hours after exercise finished
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to heart rhythm issues, arrhythmia, irregular heartbeat, implanted defibrillators, pacemakers, and tachycardia.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Fast pulse hours after exercise finished

I am not sure if I am posting this in the right forum, but hopefully I am.

I haven't done much exercise recently, but am trying to get started again, however, I find that everytime I try to do exercise the same things happens each time.  I feel good while I am exercising, but when I stop I sudden feel very tired and my pulse goes up.  During the time on the treadmill my pulse ranged from about 100-140 I think, I am not sure how accurate those machines are. I did a moderate amount of fast walking for about 25 minutes on a slight include.  I did a cool down for about 7 minutes. and then walked around for a few minutes.  I came back to my apartment which is just up the stairs from the machine, when I got upstairs I checked my pulse with another meter, it was 136.  And now five hours later, even after resting, my resting heart rate is still over 90.  

I have had heart checks before, the doctors tell me my heart is fine, my choestorl is in check also and I am only in my 30s.  

Did I just over exert myself after not having done exercise in so long?  Perhaps I should take it easy and build up to what I did today, and instead to much shorter and less intenese workouts?  

Any help would be appreciated.
Tags: heart rate, pulse, fast pulse, exercise and pulse, fast pulse after exercise, resting heart rate too high
Blank
3455166_tn?1347510733
I know exactly where you are coming from.

You had a workup done and all is well, so there is obviously nothing wrong. But what I will say is that if you have not exercised in quite some time you will become deconditioned since you aren't really using any muscles (including your heart) and this will lead to high heart rate after exercise for sure. My heart rate usually stays in the upper seventies for a while after out on a fast walk, but it comes down to the usual low sixties within in an hour.

Believe it or not, just after a week of not exercising, detraining can set in.

You may have exerted yourself a bit too much, the best thing even if you are young, is to start out with fast walking, and pace yourself - find the right speed and stay at it. If you can whistle whilst exercising, then you need to ramp it up. If you can't even talk whilst exercising, then you are pushing yourself too hard.

As a rule of thumb, aim for 20 minutes in duration at the correct pace and over time as it gets easier, just gradually crank up the intensity. Walk faster or jog, and if that is still easy, increase the duration. Take it in steps.

Best regards!
3 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
3455166_tn?1347510733
I know exactly where you are coming from.

You had a workup done and all is well, so there is obviously nothing wrong. But what I will say is that if you have not exercised in quite some time you will become deconditioned since you aren't really using any muscles (including your heart) and this will lead to high heart rate after exercise for sure. My heart rate usually stays in the upper seventies for a while after out on a fast walk, but it comes down to the usual low sixties within in an hour.

Believe it or not, just after a week of not exercising, detraining can set in.

You may have exerted yourself a bit too much, the best thing even if you are young, is to start out with fast walking, and pace yourself - find the right speed and stay at it. If you can whistle whilst exercising, then you need to ramp it up. If you can't even talk whilst exercising, then you are pushing yourself too hard.

As a rule of thumb, aim for 20 minutes in duration at the correct pace and over time as it gets easier, just gradually crank up the intensity. Walk faster or jog, and if that is still easy, increase the duration. Take it in steps.

Best regards!
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
Hey Gulfstream, thanks for your reply to this.  I am in my mid-30's.  This happend to me last year also after swimming not constantly for just 30 minutes.  It was quite scary actually.

When I use a treadmill I only walk, well, brisk walking. The setting on the machine was between 5.5 and 7.  I think they are all the same, and I have no idea what that number actually means as it is not kph or mph. so...  But it is fast walking only.  I steadily increased it during my work out, and the last 5 minutes I decreased the speed and the inclination as I was starting to feel the burn and was getting tired.

What I find is that after a few weeks at the same speed I don't even sweat anymore, and if I don't ramp it up, I am not getting any benefit from the exercise.  

Yesturday's experience was really not fun.  Though I will say I did sleep a little better even having that quicker heart rate of 90 at the time of sleeping, which usually doesn't happen.  When this happens usually I cannot sleep at all as I can hear my heart in my head.  Right now, after a nights sleep, my heart rate has returned to about 71.  But I still feel off.  I will not be doing anything today that is for sure.  But next time, perhaps I will just set the machine at 6 with only a slight incline and not push it.  As you said I need to condition my body.  I don't regularlly do exercise, as a matter of fact this is really the first time in years of doing anything cardio at all.

Thanks for your feedback, it is nice to know that probably I just over exerted myself and I need to watch that.
Blank
3455166_tn?1347510733
Hey there, my pleasure to help out.

I know what you mean, deconditioning *****, LOL. I am sure the astronauts know the feeling after flying in the ISS for six months. They so deconditioned from their flights they can't even walk when they land because their hearts aren't up to it.

I haven't really exercised in a full eighteen months, and even though I don't get breathless from some light cardio I can certainly tell I'm not in tip-top conditioning, so I am in the process of getting back into the game. Before this, I was jogging everyday, swimming, and doing pretty intense weight-lifting.

As a suggestion, this website has a heart rhythm tracker on here, and what you could do is keep track of your conditioning progress by logging your heart rate everyday as you exercise more and more to see how you are doing. You can also measure your recovery rate after each exercise session.

Any questions, let me know. ;-)
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Top Arrhythmias Answerers
1423357_tn?1414258965
Blank
tom_h
Central, MA
1807132_tn?1318747197
Blank
michellepetkus
Chicago, IL
612551_tn?1247839157
Blank
Jerry_NJ
NJ
257552_tn?1404606154
Blank
Artaud
Pittsburgh, PA
86819_tn?1378951092
Blank
Bromley
995271_tn?1408549100
Blank
itdood
PA
MedHelp Health Answers
Recent Activity
1236893_tn?1408490528
Blank
FOODS NOT TO EAT!
18 hrs ago by gymdandee
1236893_tn?1408490528
Blank
Statins: lowering cholestorol, rais...
Oct 28 by gymdandee
1236893_tn?1408490528
Blank
Successful Treatment of Schizophren...
Oct 27 by gymdandee
Heart Rhythm Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Arrhythmias Answerers
1423357_tn?1414258965
Blank
tom_h
Central, MA
1807132_tn?1318747197
Blank
michellepetkus
Chicago, IL
612551_tn?1247839157
Blank
Jerry_NJ
NJ
257552_tn?1404606154
Blank
Artaud
Pittsburgh, PA
86819_tn?1378951092
Blank
Bromley
995271_tn?1408549100
Blank
itdood
PA