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Heart Fibulator?
I just have a quick question about my step dad.. he recently had a heart fibulator put in and now if you are standing next to him you can actually hear it working.... is this normal? my mom said she could like hear and almost feel it sitting on the couch next to him? what does that mean?
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I never heard of such a thing as an ICD being heard by someone else unless they are actually getting de-fibbed at the time and your step dad would sure know if he was.

Maybe your mom and step dad were having a close "moment" on the couch (good for them if they were) and he got zapped!  Sounds like fun.  If ICD's are doing such things these days I think I'm going to trade my boring old pacemaker in for that funky one your step dad has.  Hmmm, wonder if I should start saving up so I can get one into my husband too???

Sorry folks, I don't know what has come over me tonight, but feeling so much better I just can't help being in a good mood.  It's a serious question and I have no other answer.  I will try to behave from here on and make some sense in my Daily hospital update.
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No they werent have a "moment" because they are going through a divorse she was just there so he could visit with his son... but she was just wondering why she could hear the thing working and almost feel it on the couch?
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Oh Jeez, I'm so sorry, I truly truly would never have made such an insensitive suggestion if I'd known, please accept my apology, it was very thoughtless of me.  I don't know much about ICD devices so I can't even attempt to make it up to you with an answer which could help you out.  Maybe someone with an ICD can give more info, and once again, I apologise.
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21064 tn?1309312333
My dad has a defibrillator and I've never heard anything.  I'm with Thinline, I've never heard that from anyone else.  Hopefully, one of our members with a defib can help.

Thinline,
So happy to hear you're feeling better!!  YEAH!!
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Soon as I've had it out with my Vienna grouch I'll be posting an update.  YEAH I'M FEELING A ZILLION TIMES BETTER.
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Why don’t you just forget about me, can’t you dear? Enjoy your new friendships, and your new find popularity, would you? And.....give my name out from your posts OK? I was doing you a favor without  giving names ,because they are my friends ,and it is not of your business who ,and why didn’t like you, but told you the truth that they also: didn’t want you, because you were never our friends, now obvious you never will be. I didn’t want to discus that here in front of all, but you started it, all that belongs  to privet conversations, but you called for it….soooo…NOW  peace…again give me or my screen name a  break OK?:)
Have a good day.

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257552 tn?1404606154
Hello,

Researching this topic, I was astonished to find an article from the American College of Cardiology ♥ about a man that suddenly developed Tinnitus. This man had recently had an ICD Implanted, and started to have problems with his ears. The Ear Doctor found nothing that could explain the problem, but fortunately being a savvy individual, sent the patient to a Cardiologist. It was discovered that the Implantable ICD had developed undesired resistance in the leads, and the Tinnitus that the man heard was actually a warning sound that the ICD generates to alert the patient to this problem.

The article summarizes thus "The investigators conclude that training and education about various ICD features including patient alert should be provided to both patients and physicians. We believe that educating the entire medical community to various ICD features is hardly feasible, but undoubtedly it makes no sense to activate features such as patient alert without educating the patients. During routine postimplant ICD programming, the alert signal should be demonstrated to the patient (as available via programmer telemetry) and the alert time should be discussed and individually adapted to the patient’s waking hours”.

Apparently this is a feature that the can be enabled on the ICD. The article says that enabling it without informing and demonstrating the feature to the patient is rather stupid, and continues to say that the feature should be enabled only during waking hours.

I am not asserting that this had anything to do with the original post in this forum thread, but am providing it for those in the forum that have ICDs.

In an unrelated ♥ heart sounds story, years ago, while assisting my friend in his Furnace repair business, I was in the basement of a customers home. While standing there, I became conscious of a ticking sound. Being fond of older watches (the wind up kind), I looked at the customers wrist (silly, you can’t usually hear wrist watches from a distance anyway), and saw nothing. I then considered a Pocket Watch, maybe the customer had one. I asked him about it and he revealed that what I was hearing was his artifical heart valve. True enough, if you listened closely enough, you could hear a missing tick, either with the valve not fully traveling or more likely when the man’s heart skipped a beat. Being rather obsessed with the idea, later that day I told a man at a furnace parts counter (store) about the sounds. Lo and behold, the store had a woman that also had an artifical  heart valve that could be heard ticking (I didn’t hear it, the employee related the story to me). It’s a interesting world.

Regards to all. ♫ ♫ ♫ Have a Happy Holiday Season. ♫ ♫ ♫
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21064 tn?1309312333
Your respones are always so informative and helpful.  The "additives" are great!  Thanks for making the forum a little more fun : 0

I'll bet others would agree with me when I say they make me smile : )
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Everyone is talking about felling much better after they had the fib put in, but what about the cons?
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Last year, April of 2010, I had a heart attacks.  Why I say heart "attacks" because I did not know I was having them.  What I thought of having pnemonia (not sure how to spell the word) and over several weeks.  Here is was of several heart attacks.  By the time I got to the hospital and have a few test done, I have about 85% of my heart muscle dead.  I have a Fibulator / Pacemaker.  I have been since zapped a few times in this last year.  The feeling is not fun, but it did save my life a few times.
     So, folks, watch what you eat.  Limit your sodium, the fat, and do not over indulge in eating.  It is also best to get some other exercise, beside you working (like walking, jogging or running, weightlifting, or anything else that may help).  Don't be a "couch potato!"  The mistake of sitting around and spending way too much at a computer and/or television.

Thank you!
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1242509 tn?1279124464
Artaud's reserach is correct, the newer devices in the past couple of years have a "patient alert", "patient notifier" in them designed to either make a noise or vibrate if a setting is not within a certain range. When a pt hears/feels this he/she should call the EP Dr and have the device interrogated.
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