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Heart beat/rate per minute
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Heart beat/rate per minute

When going from a sitting position to an active position (standing up, walking), is the normal heart beat/rate supposed to go up right away (spike up quickly) or supposed to go up gradually (spike up slowly)? And when going from an active position to a sitting position, is the heart beat/rate supposed to go down quickly (spike down quickly) or spike down gradually?


I just started wearing a watch that records pulse and find this all fascinating/educational, but cannot find anything online so far that talks about what is normal/abnormal in terms of heart beat spikes when going from a sitting/resting position to an active position.  

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1124887_tn?1313758491
Hi

I would sell my pulse watch if I were you. Constantly monitoring your heart rate will eventually turn you neurotic. You don't want that.

The heart rate will increase when standing up. How much and how rapid depends on blood pressure, blood volume, room temperature, hydration, stomach fullness, lots of other factors and of course how much attention you pay to the heart rhythm. If you expect the heart rate to increase a lot, it will.

If the heart rate doubles instantly (from one beat to the next) you should see the doctor, but quite rapid increases in the heart rate is normal and something the body does in response to the blood running down in your stomach and legs when standing (this is caused by gravity). Depending on how much the blood vessels contract in response, the heart rate will increase. People with low blood pressure often have a higher increase in heart rate when standing.

"Normal" increase in HR is up to 20 beats, but much much higher numbers are still normal if some of the conditions mentioned above apply to you.

Forget this and I would recommend that you stop monitoring your heart rate.
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Avatar_n_tn
Good advice!! You are right. I will put the watch away LOL.  But TYVM for the info and making it easy to understand!
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1655526_tn?1330659229
I wondered the same thing myself. I bought a pulse watch when I was having SVT and wore it just for that. I didn't pay attention to my pulse unless I felt I was going into an attack.AFter my ablation I was checking my pulse all of the time and noticed what you did and I didn't know if that was normal or what was normal. I finally took my watch off because I was constantly taking my pulse, on the treadmill, when I stood, etc; I came to the conclusion I didn't know what it was like before the ablation so I didn't have anything to compare it to except the way I felt and that was a better measure. So I'm so glad you posed this question because it answered it for me too. Thanks to  you and thanks to is something is wrong.:)
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1124887_tn?1313758491
You're welcome. Happy I could help! :)
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967168_tn?1343732745
Recognize the name Greg Paige of the Wiggles show? He had orthostatic intolerance - a disorder of the ANS occurring when a person stands up which causes changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and blood flow to the brain.

"When a normal individual stands up, gravity causes blood to pool in the legs, and return of blood to the heart is decreased. In order to compensate for this reduction, the body releases a surge of adrenaline (epinephrine). The heart beats faster and more forcefully, thereby pumping blood more efficiently to vital organs (especially the brain)."

In some individuals the reduction of blood return triggers a miscommunication between the heart and the brain.  Just when the heart needs to beat faster, the brain sends out a message that the heart rate should be slowed down, and that the blood vessels in the arms and legs should dilate. These actions take even more blood away from the central part of the circulation where it is needed.

Typically, if your HR goes up >30 bpm or stays above 120bpm after 10 full minutes of standing, it can be considered Postural Orthostatic Intolerance Syndrome POTS, Orthostatic Intolerance OI and a couple of other ANS issues; but if the HR goes down <30 points it can be Neurally mediated Hypotension NMH, Orthostatic Hypotension OH etc...if it's a one time thing then it's probably no concern; but if it's a chronic problem then seeing a doctor who knows about ANS issues can help dx these conditions through autonomic testing like a tilt table test.

for anyone who wants to learn more; visit the National Dysautonomia Research Foundation www.ndrf.org click on learn more and then scroll down to read the pdf format of the NDRF patient handbook; click The "Automatic" Nervous System - by Dr. Blair Grubb who is one of the leading dr's in the world about the ANS.

it's for patients with ANS problems but it explains so much about all of our "inner" workings and these little things we take for granted daily like breathing, heart rate, blood pressure etc. it's easy to read and explains alot; which may be helpful in understanding issues within our bodies
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967168_tn?1343732745
also; here's the Dysautonomia forum's information here http://www.medhelp.org/health_pages/Neurological-Disorders/Autonomic-Dysfunction--Dysautonomia-Index-Page/show/857?cid=196 to me it's a bit more complicated reading than the ndrf's website
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1124887_tn?1313758491
POTS is a really uncommon disorder. If the heart is constantly racing when standing up, you should of course see a doctor to rule it out, but I think suggesting such a diagnosis will only make people more afraid.

Most important thing is: Do not pay attention to the heart rate/rhythm if you don't have other symptoms like dizziness, fainting, chest pain or shortness of breath. At least that's what my 4 cardiologists told me. It helps me a lot.

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967168_tn?1343732745
According to Dr. Grubb and his associates; It was once estimated that nearly 500,000 Americans had POTS. However, with research advances and growing physician education the number of people found to have POTS symptoms is steadily rising.

It is now estimated that one out of every hundred teens has POTS (Fischer, 2007) and is considered to be the most common form of Dysautonomia.   Despite the enormity of the numbers, these conditions are among the least understood of the autonomic disorders.

It's been around at least since 1940 and is the most common reason for referral for chronic orthostatic intolerance and there also is an overlap with anxiety/panic disorder as well as many auto immune diseases like CFS.  Often, these conditions tend to be misdiagnosed as either a psychiatric or anxiety - related disorders, due to the nature of the symptoms.

The normal response for a change in body position, results in a stabilization to the upright position in approximately sixty seconds.  During this process, the normal change in heart rate would include an increase in heart rate of 10 to 15 beats per minute, and an increase in diastolic pressure of 10 mm Hg, with only a slight change in systolic pressure.

again, if it's a one time thing then it's probably no concern; but if it's a chronic problem then seeing a doctor who knows about ANS issues can help dx these conditions through autonomic testing like a tilt table test.

Symptoms may include the following; but each patient is different and not all have the same symptoms:

Symptoms
The symptoms for these conditions may include the following:
Excessive Fatigue
Exercise Intolerance
Recurrent Syncope or Near Syncope
Dizziness
Nausea
Tachycardia
Palpitations
Visual Disturbances
Blurred Vision
Tunnel Vision
Graying Out
Tremulusness
Weakness - most noticeable in the legs
Chest Discomfort
Shortness of Breath
Mood Swings
Migraines and Other Headaches
Gastrointestinal Problems
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1425157_tn?1311655279
get tested for POTS
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1124887_tn?1313758491
As you wrote, GAD (generalized anxiety disorder) can manifest with completely similar symptoms. The reason is that your body is alerted and ejects lots of adrenaline in almost every situation. Standing up is "scary" and requires an elevated heart rate.

Most important:
I had an increase in heart rate from 70 to 180 upon standing once: Do I have POTS? Occationally, my heart rate increases at least 30-35 bpm when standing. I still don't have POTS. The poster doesn't say how much the heart rate increases.
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967168_tn?1343732745
This is WHY I mentioned all types of ANS issues NOT just POTS in my first post; because the OP asked about HR; standing and hr spikes.

[Typically, if your HR goes up >30 bpm or stays above 120bpm after 10 full minutes of standing, it can be considered Postural Orthostatic Intolerance Syndrome POTS, Orthostatic Intolerance OI and a couple of other ANS issues; but if the HR goes down <30 points it can be Neurally mediated Hypotension NMH, Orthostatic Hypotension OH etc]

I also said "if it's a one time thing then it's probably no concern; but if it's a chronic problem then seeing a doctor who knows about ANS issues can help dx these conditions through autonomic testing like a tilt table test"

Also, I gave information about the NDRF for more info - these little things we take for granted daily like breathing, heart rate, blood pressure etc. it's easy to read and explains alot; which may be helpful in understanding issues within our bodies and has helped MANY understand issues with their systems and helped relieved some of the anxiety they have encountered

Please don't take things I say out of context; everyone's opinion and views are valuable here and we all have our own perspectives; which I respect but I don't seem to get the same in return; which is frustrating.
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1124887_tn?1313758491
It's OK. I understand that :)

I just think it's important not to suggest any diagnosis, because people tend to google it and get scared.. there is a lot out there to be scared of, and some symptoms almost always match something dangerous.. I guess that's why the doctors need to be experienced :p to differ the dangerous stuff from the benign..

Take care :)
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Avatar_m_tn
I actually think it is great when people mention possible medical problems it can relate to. I have been battling POTS for a year now and just last week received a diagnosis after a series of ANS testing. I saw multiple neurologists and Cardiologist, as well as rheumatologist, and a gastroenterologist. I wish I had posted my symptooms and had someone comment about the possible connection. I would have prompted me to mention it to my doctor and possibly gotten me a diagnosis sooner. It isn't meant to scare anyone. It can keep someone from ignoring a symptom that could be serious. Better to worry and have it be nothing than not worry and find out to late it was serious.
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967168_tn?1343732745
As a Dysautonomia sufferer from age 9 - 42 and being misdiagnosed the entire time; I try to mention it to anyone who has symptoms because so many patients go years and years without diagnoses or treatment.  I really feel had a doctor or someone told me before 3 years ago about it; I would not have gotten as severe as I am now and been able to receive testing and treatment.

good thing you got your tested and treated =)
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1124887_tn?1313758491
Hi! Good to see you! :) How are you doing? Haven't seen you here for a couple of years..
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967168_tn?1343732745
thanks for asking =)  I'm doing ok; took a 6 month break to move...but find myself back here seeking answers of my own still  since we got settled in
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Avatar_m_tn
Amazing. I was just told by my chiro, that my heart rate was 60bpm when lying down, but shot up to 80bpm when I stood up. He said this concerned him greatly and wanted to sell me heart supplements. So here I am looking for answers. Seems like I might actually be completely normal or in great shape :)
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4100843_tn?1349813235
Hello, all,

I was diagnosed with POTS last year after having suffered for six years. If any of you would like to chat, or have questions, feel free to contact me.

Thanks, and best wishes!

Brandi
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Avatar_m_tn
I appreciate you trying to help the community, however I respectfully have to disagree with part of what you're trying to say.

I suffer from POTS and was diagnosed after a "positive" Tilt Table Test. The increase in heart-rate that you describe you having of 30-35 bpm is NOT normal. I know this is an old thread, but I wanted to post here to help those that may run across this thread (as I did by searching POTS on Google). If someone is experiencing an increase in heart-rate of 30+ bpm from supine (laying) position to standing up, within 10 minutes, or has a sustained heart-rate of 120 bpm or greater within 10 minutes of standing up has POTS, period. That's the very definition of POTS and if that happens on a Tilt Table Test, then you have it. While anxiety can make the heart-rate higher, anxiety itself is a symptom of POTS. Blood pressure changes are irrelevant in the diagnosis of POTS. In matter of fact, someone can have Hypertension and still have POTS; this is called HyperPOTS. I have Hypertension with POTS. I just don't want false information being spread on the internet. While someone should not ruminate all day about their health, it's good to be aware of what's going on with your body and to go to the doctor if you're experiencing a 30+ bpm increase in heart-rate from supine position to standing up, especially if symptoms are present like dizziness, pre-syncope, syncope, anxiety, hypotension, hypertension, insomnia, etc. All of these symptoms can be caused by POTS.

POTS symptoms are listed here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postural_orthostatic_tachycardia_syndrome

In all reality, a healthy person's heart-rate should only increase 5-15 bpm from resting to standing up. Good luck to everyone.
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