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What to Avoid, or what helps prevent/stop PVC's?
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What to Avoid, or what helps prevent/stop PVC's?

Anything help? Foods? Drinks? Exercises?

What helps while having them?

Any success stories?
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I think PVC's are personal to each and every one of us and what works for some doesn't necessarily work for others.  The most common culprits for bringing them on appear to be anxiety/stress, alcohol or eating a big meal.  For the most part though, they just rear their ugly heads like they have a mind of their own.

What helps me is just ignoring them.  If you are newly diagnosed, this is hard to do but once you've had them for awhile and know they aren't going to hurt you, it's easier to forget they are there.
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These are some general suggestions:
1.  Get enough sleep. (7 to 8 hours every night).
2.  Stay away from all stimulants such as coffee, chocolate, colas, decongestants.
3.  Exercise moderately for at least 30 minutes a day to help sleep, loose weight, lower blood pressure, and decrease stress.  I suggest getting a program from a trainer and sticking to it.
4.  Look for unnecessary stressors in your life to eliminate and learn to relax.  Take a half hour a day to just sit, pray, and meditate. (30 min. of exercise and 30 minutes of quiet time)
5.  Learn some relaxation exercises such as proper breathing when you are stressed.  For example breath from your stomach rather than from your chest.  You should be able to see your stomach move in and out.  This will help your body relax.
6.  Make sure you are not dehydrated by drinking plenty of water.
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257552_tn?1404606154
Hi,

As above:

Sleep is very important, sacrificing the evening TV shows is worth it in return for a less symptomatic day. You can use a VCR or DVR to record the shows you may enjoy that occur later in the evening, and watch them the next day.

Drink sufficient quantities of water. Many people with Mitral Valve Prolapse, such as myself, (not necessarily you), have MVP Syndrome. People with MVP Syndrome often have Dysautonomia, an imbalance of the Autonomic Nervous System. This imbalance can bring:  “Frequent, vague but disturbing aches and pains, faintness (or even actual fainting spells), fatigue and inertia, severe anxiety attacks, tachycardia, hypotension, poor exercise tolerance, gastrointestinal symptoms such as irritable bowel syndrome, sweating, dizziness, blurred vision, numbness and tingling, anxiety and (quite understandably), depression”. [And of course, Palpitations]. Part of the ill effects of Dysautonomia is the loss of the natural reflex for thirst. Personally, I can go the entire day without drinking any water. This is not natural. I have a dog, he's 4 years old, and he seems like he is endlessly drinking water (if you have a dog, they drink in maddening licks of three, occasionally with a fourth thrown in, just when you believed you were going to go mad from listening to the cycles of 3 ;-). He seems to have the natural desire to drink. People with MVP need to be sure to drink sufficient quantities of water. Keeping the volume of blood where it should be supposedly helps to reduce the number of PVCs. My Cardiologist pushes the idea of drinking sufficient quantities of water.

MVP, or Mitral Valve Prolapse, can often be diagnosed by the Doctor listening to your heart with a stethoscope. But not always. MVP was once thought to be more significant than it is now, as the medical field is discovering, during tests, that more people have a small degree of prolapse than was previously believed. I have seen several Cardiologist over the years. 2 of them believed that I have MVP, one didn’t. I do have the symptoms of MVP Syndrome though.

Please remember, these PVCs can come and go. I have suffered with them since I was 15 years old, and I am now 50. They come and go in episodes. My last episode was longer than a year. Yuch! But it finally broke.

Best of health to you and yours.
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