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Analyze Hepatitis profile test and seeking medical advise
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Analyze Hepatitis profile test and seeking medical advise

I had a hepatitis profile due to the reccomendation when I took up a medical check-up. I inform them that I had a medical history of Hepatitis A about more than 10 years ago thats why I have to get a hepatitis test. I will state what is written on exam result that was given to me.

Test name - cut-off value - Patient Count - Result

HBsAg - 0.346 - 1.512 - Reactive
Anti-HBs - 0.336 - 0.275 - Negative
HBeAg - 0.342 - 3.184 Reactive
Anti-HBe - 0.469 - 1.137 - Negative
Anti-HBc IgG - 0.505 - 2.401 Negative
Anti-HBc IgM 0.361 - 0.153 Negative

I would like to know about the findings of the test and know what those numbers represent. And also, what procedure should I take. Also since this is required for a pre-employment, would it somehow affect my status of getting the job?

Thank you very much for your time and advise.
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Avatar_m_tn
HBsAg - 0.346 - 1.512 - Reactive = You have HBV.
Anti-HBs - 0.336 - 0.275 - Negative = You are not immune.
HBeAg - 0.342 - 3.184 Reactive = You may be at acute stage now
Anti-HBe - 0.469 - 1.137 - Negative = You are not clear of HBV yet.
Anti-HBc IgG - 0.505 - 2.401 Negative = You did not have "past" infection.
Anti-HBc IgM 0.361 - 0.153 Negative = You may be at acute stage now.

Hope this helps.
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Avatar_m_tn
Correction:

Anti-HBc IgM 0.361 - 0.153 Negative = You may be at chronic stage now.

Sorry.
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Avatar_f_tn
We can't give medical advice b/c we are patients and not doctors.

Where do you live? Are you Asian?  Age? Gender?

You need to see a specialist now to deal with your infection.
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Avatar_m_tn
I see. So it means I have Hepatitis B right... kinda shocking and depressing to know. Yup I'm asian and live in the Philippines. Male and 28 years old. I am planning to see a Gastroenerologist... just to hear the shocking news for myself.

Though I am somewhat trying to recuperate from the news... just wanna ask from those (the patients) who experience this one on basically what they do about it.

Like how long they take the medication? By having HBV will be a reason to not get an employment? For whatever answer that a person can give based on personal experience is well-appreciated.
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Avatar_m_tn
>>>Like how long they take the medication?

Some of us are being treated, some are not, but hopefully all of us are being monitored medically.

>>>By having HBV will be a reason to not get an employment?

Most of us work, have families, and contribute to the society like everyone else.  If your job is not invasive in nature, such as that of a surgeon, nurse, etc., and if you are not in acute infectious stage, you can work like everyone else.  Of course, take care of yourself, protect your loved ones and other members of the society are your duty and a lot depends on your knowledge about HBV.  To educate yourself, you can start with

1.  http://www.medhelp.org/health_pages/list?cid=153,

2.  read through as many threads in this forum as you can,

3.  and if you still desire to know more, go through http://www.medhelp.org/posts/show/492008 and swim in the HBV sea of internet.

Best wishes.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks for the prompt reply cajim... it really help since I am in a state of confusion right now.

It doesn't mean you need to start the medication right? Although it will entirely depend on the suggestion of the doctor right? Just looking around the net... it would take years for the medication.

Also... will HBV be a problem with medical insurance company? Since HBV is a contagious and infectious disease... well just wanna ask to the people who have one and if there is a conflict with it.

Again, thanks for the help and I will go through those links that you gave me for self-awareness. Right now, I am at a loss due to this situation... guess anyone would be at the start ^_^
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Avatar_m_tn
If you are at acute stage now, your body is fighting HBV and you have a chance to clear it and become immune (your HBsAg becomes nonreactive and your Anti-HBs becomes reactive).

If the above results are not obtained in 6 months, then the condition becomes chronic.  People with chronic HBV may present in 1 of 4 phases of infection: (1) in a state of immune tolerance, (2) with hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)–positive chronic hepatitis, (3) as an inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carrier, or (4) with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis.

Depending on which phase you are in you may or may not be contagious/infectious and I think you should be able to work in a medical insurance company.

Best.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks for the prompt reply cajim. Actually it seems like I misinterpret the second question. I apologize for this one

Well its like this. The company that I am applying for of course have a HMO a health care that is common to workers... ours is called Medicard. So since I have to submit the laboratory finding to them, will it be (the HBV) a problem for me to obtain health benefits from the company that I am applying?

Also, if ever thing will go out right... like I am hired by the company despite my current situation, can I be allowed to travel abroad? Since the company usually have training abroad due to the company's nature. Now since the lab finding states that I am positive for HBV, will it hinder me from travelling abroad for work-related task like for example in the US or Europe?
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Avatar_m_tn
Ayeika,

It's ok to be confuse. I was there a few weeks ago. Go see the doctor and see what he will recommend. Treatment or not will depend on a lot of variables such as your e antigen status, HBV DNA viral load, liver panel (AST, ALT) enzymes level, state of your liver, ultrasound and biopsy results. Your doctor will add everything up and will determine the best possible treatment or he may just recommend monitoring your disease. Remember, having HBV isn't the end of the world. Many people continue to live normal lives and a full life. However, it is imperative that you must continue to monitor your disease and be one step ahead of it. Learn as much as you can but don't let the dark side of the disease affect your mentality. They can't write papers about how well a few hundred million people living with HBV are doing. It would be too much writing don't you think? Instead, they focus on the bad things it can do.

Since you are e antigen positive and e antibodies negative, you should ask to have your HBV DNA viral load done. If it's >100,000 copies/mL, then you may need drugs to help with e seroconversion. The drugs will help with developing e antibodies and lower your DNA count. Remember, e antigen is secreted when viral replication occurs and the more virus is in your blood, the greater the risk of liver damage. .

Come back with questions. We'll be here...:)
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Avatar_m_tn
>>>can I be allowed to travel abroad? Since the company usually have training abroad due to the company's nature. Now since the lab finding states that I am positive for HBV, will it hinder me from travelling abroad for work-related task like for example in the US or Europe?

These will be company specific and country specific: if you read other HBV patients' experiences here, you will see that there are people who have no problem working and traveling wherever they choose, then there are many who fear they are discriminated against in work place, refused entry into a country, or deported from the residing country.

Best.
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Avatar_m_tn
I've went to see a gastroenterologist yesterday and I guess I would confirm that it is HBV... although it wasn't decided on what stage it is... I was ask to get a SGPT and  SGOT (I think thats AST and ALT).

So I would like to ask if you guys know a site or info that can interpret the result from it. I might get the result tomorrow or I might get it the day when the doctor get back on her working schedule at the hospital that I went.
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Avatar_m_tn
>>>SGPT and  SGOT (I think thats AST and ALT)

What are normal levels of AST and ALT?

The normal range of values for AST (SGOT) is from 5 to 40 units per liter of serum (the liquid part of the blood).

The normal range of values for ALT (SGPT) is from 7 to 56 units per liter of serum.

What do elevated AST and ALT mean?

AST (SGOT) and ALT (SGPT) are sensitive indicators of liver damage from different types of disease. But it must be emphasized that higher-than-normal levels of these liver enzymes should not be automatically equated with liver disease. They may mean liver problems or they may not. The interpretation of elevated AST and ALT levels depends upon the whole clinical picture and so it is best done by doctors experienced in evaluating liver disease.
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Avatar_f_tn
Also remember that "normal" and "healthy" are 2 different values.  A healthy ALT for a man is about 30 and for a woman you're looking at 19.  Lab values are skewed higher due to a population sample that tends to have elevated liver enzymes.

ayeika, since my diagnosis ten years ago at age 28 I have had three children and felt great.  I continue to do well and have not started treatment.  I don't know for certain the state of my liver as I haven't had a biopsy but I am under the care of a gastroenterologist who is well-versed in Hep B (among Asians in particular) and he seems unconcerned.  Now, the wisdom of that is up for debate but my overall message is that now is not the time to hang up your dreams or change your life's course too drastically.

Live a healthful life.  One thing that a chronic condition gives you is some perspective on what's important and what isn't.  It makes you appreciate each moment.  Don't spend your time worrying.  I know a woman with HBV who got it from her mother who also has HBV.  Her mother is 97 years old.  That's too long to worry.
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Avatar_f_tn
I should add that while worrying is counter-productive you don't want to become careless about monitoring your condition.  

Come back and post your lab values from your viral load and liver panel.
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Avatar_f_tn
what is the cutoff value ayeika mentioned in the tests?
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Avatar_m_tn
cutoff value?  Not sure what you are referring to.
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Avatar_f_tn
Test name - cut-off value - Patient Count - Result

HBsAg - 0.346 - 1.512 - Reactive
Anti-HBs - 0.336 - 0.275 - Negative
HBeAg - 0.342 - 3.184 Reactive
Anti-HBe - 0.469 - 1.137 - Negative
Anti-HBc IgG - 0.505 - 2.401 Negative
Anti-HBc IgM 0.361 - 0.153 Negative

here its mentioned cutoff value Hbsag -0.346 wat does ths refer to?
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Avatar_m_tn
I am not sure, but see this:  For example, for HBsAg the cut-off value is 0.346, the patient's count is 1.512, beyond the cut-off point, so it is Reactive.  

"HBsAg is typically detected by immunoassays that use anti-HBs to capture antigen in the sample. As with all infectious disease assays, nonspecific binding can occur. Manufacturers determine a "cutoff value" (C) that balances the necessary high sensitivity for detecting the antigen (or anti-HBs antibody) with the need to avoid false-positive results. Samples with signal values (S) above the "cutoff value" are called positive (S/C ratio >1). In the case of tests for antibodies to viral antigens (e.g., anti-HCV and anti-HIV), weakly positive results are often falsely positive and require confirmation with tests using isolated viral antigens (recombinant immunoblot for HCV, Western blot for HIV). In the case of tests for HBsAg, manufacturers provide a neutralization test that can be used to confirm true positivity of the results. In this test, samples with S/C ratio >1 are incubated with anti-HBs; if HBsAg is truly present, the anti-HBs in the neutralization step blocks binding to the reagent antibodies, reducing or eliminating the signal from HBsAg (positive neutralization test result). "

Best.

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Avatar_m_tn
Hi,

Some very interesting replies on this thread.... I totally agree with what Zelly and Confuseguy say in regards to staying positive and staying healthy. unfortunately we don't all have such good hep advisers (like the one Zelly has, lucky you!).... but the most positive thing about all this is that you are still relatively young in finding out and can therefore adjust your ways to living well and looking after that valuable member of your body.... Take care bro....
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Avatar_m_tn
Please help me. This is the result that I got.

HBsAg w/ Titer = 0.374 = Non-Reactive
Anti HBs = > 1000 = Reactive
HBeAg = 0.103 = Non-Reactive
Anti HBe = 0.479 = Reactive
Anti HBc IgM = 0.055 = Non-Reactive
Anti HBc IgG = 0.007 = Reactive
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