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HBsAG how infectious ?
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HBsAG how infectious ?

Hi,

i been informed by the doctor that i had HBsAG according to the blood results. I did not know anything about this. My parents said that it must have happened when i was a child.

The amount of virus in my blood was not much therefore the doctor also confirmed that i could have had it in my childhood. I am 30 years old now and my partner has had the blood test and nothing came up in his blood. (He said in about 3 weeks time, another test result will show whether it is definitely negative or not).  He has had the 1. injection so far.

--  I am not sure how infectious the HBsAG is. Is it safer not to kiss each other for 6 months until he gets all 3 vaccines ? :(

-- My liver values were sth like SGPT 70-1  (?) Anti - HCV  ...dont know what this means.

I would so much appreciate if you could give me a bit more help on understanding what i need to do, or should avoid, or what the difference is between HBsAG and HBeAG..

Thanks a lot in advance for any help, advice you can give.

Nil



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HBsAg is whether the antibodies are present in your blood or not.
HBeAg is a measurement of your viral load

What I'm more interested in is what your anti-HBs results are - if positive, that's a GOOD thing.  It means you are immune AND non-contagious.  It means your HBsAg could be positive but if your anti-HBs is positive too, you're golden.

Your HBeAg - are you positive or negative here?

Trish
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181575_tn?1250202386
"HBsAg is whether the antibodies are present in your blood or not.
HBeAg is a measurement of your viral load"

That is not correct.

HBsAg is the HepB surface antigen.  Positive means a HepB infection.
HBeAg is the second soluble antigen.  From the virus' point of view, this e-antigen is a evolution work of art, designed to hide from our immune system.  I won't get into it, it's complicated.

List your all your HepB markers with HBV DNA to get some feedback.

From the limited info thus far, you may be an inactive carrier.  If this is the case, you are LESS infectious but could still infect others who are not immuned.  Wait on sex.  Kissing is low risk.  Just don't over do it ;) Make sure there are not open cuts / sores in mouth to keep risk low.
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Explain please.  I contracted HBV when I was in my late teens, a very mild case.  My surface antibody is positive.  I'm also positive for the HBsAg and negative for the HBeAg.  The Health Unit does not consider me to be contagious to anybody and I am immune as well.  I have never been vaccinated for HBV since the diagnosis of HCV since I'm considered to be immune.  This was also confirmed by information I was sent by a large Hepatitis organization who's name escapes me at the moment (Hepatitis International?) that explains this in good detail. So I don't understand your comments here.  I'm not saying I think you're wrong.  I'm simply saying I don't understand.  Thanks.

Trish
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181575_tn?1250202386
Hi Trish.

How long ago was the explanation by this hepatitis organization? Just from what you wrote, I think their explanation is wrong.

First let review the marker (which could be confusing):
HBsAg is the HepB surface antigen.  As long as this is positive, the virus is replicating, thus is a marker of an HepB infection.

HBsAb is the HepB surface antibody.  A positive here usually means successful clearance and/ or immunity to HepB.  However,  this is only true if HBsAg is negative.  If both HBsAg and HBsAb stays positive, you still have HepB.  Because this HBsAb is not a true antibody to the HBsAg, thus is quite useless to clear the surface antigen.  I am pretty certain of this because I am positive for both.  It's actually quite common to be both positive.

HBeAg is the HepB eAntigen, which is the second soluble antigen.  This little pest is sneeky.  It masks itself as a smooth looking protein and looks like other autoantigens so it's less noticeable to your immune system.  During the course of an infection, most people immune systems will eventually recognize this antigen and develop the e-antibody (HBeAb) to neutralize it.  So your HBeAb will be positive and HBeAg will be negative, which is the common marker for an inactive carrier.  Inactive carriers have regained some effective immune control over the virus, thus lower viral count and activity.

The HepB viral count is determined by the HBV DNA (not the HBeAg as you thought).  Some people have a gigantic viral count with negative HBeAg, courtesy of a mutant strain, which is an active disease.

If your markers are accurate, it could be that you an inactive carrier, with low viral activity, especially since you also have HepC because I read that usually one virus will dominate.

If I would you, I would ask MD to run a full HepB panel.  If HBsAg is positive, then do the HBV DNA to assess viral activity. Monitoring would be recommended if this is the case, because an inactive status could change, again courtesy of a mutant strain.

Hope this helps and good luck.

-Steven
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Avatar_f_tn
I'll check my results.  I could be wrong on the HBsAg being positive.  What I know is that I'm considered non-contagious and immune.  Thanks for straightening that out.  I'd misunderstood the meaning of the HBsAg and I thought it meant that you'd had it at SOME point but didn't mean that you were infectious.  
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181575_tn?1250202386
Yes, you probably got your markers mixed up.  Which would be good news in this case ;)

The core antibody (HBcAb) being positive would indicated a infection, but it won't tell you if it's a past ot present one.

Take care.
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