Aa
A
A
Close
446474 tn?1446351282
Cirrhosis and SOC Treatment Data from 45 Studies

There are many people who have posted question regarding treatment when having cirrhosis. This compilation of 45 studies answers many of those questions and shows that having cirrhosis (both compensated and decompensated) has a major affect on chances of SVR and side effects during treatment.
NOTE: This data is based on SOC treatment only! Future results with the addition of DAAs may very.

Major take aways:

This review highlights the efficacy and safety of treatment of HCV infection in cirrhotic patients with respect to the clinical stage of the disease.

The rates of sustained virologic response to pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin ranged from 10% to 44% for HCV genotypes 1/4 to 33% to 72% for genotypes 2/3 in compensated cirrhosis.
falling to 0% to 16% and 44% to 57%, respectively, in the decompensated stage
compared with 29% to 55% for genotypes 1/4 and 70% to 80% for genotypes 2/3 in noncirrhotic patients

HCV clearance was associated with a reduced risk of liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma development, liver-related mortality, and hepatitis recurrence after liver transplantation.

Headache (54%), irritability (38%), fatigue (34%), and nausea (30%) were the most common adverse events in compensated patients
anorexia (100%), fatigue (59%), neutropenia (53%), and thrombocytopenia (50%) were most common in decompensated patients

Based on effectiveness and tolerability data, therapy has a significant effect in patients with compensated cirrhosis, while decompensated patients need to weigh the risks versus benefits of treatment.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Clinical Therapeutics
Volume 32, Issue 13 , Pages 2117-2138, December 2010
http://www.clinicaltherapeutics.com/article/PIIS0149291811000221/abstract

"A review of the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in cirrhosis"; Vezali E, Aghemo A, Colombo M; Clinical Therapeutics 32 (13), 2117-38 (Dec 2010)

Background: Cirrhosis developing during chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a risk of anticipated liver-related death, therefore representing a dominant indication to anti-HCV therapy.
Objective: This review highlights the efficacy and safety of treatment of HCV infection in cirrhotic patients with respect to the clinical stage of the disease.

Methods: The PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases, as well as the conference proceed- ings from the annual meetings of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the European Association for the Study of the Liver, and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, were searched for articles published in English from January 1990 through May 2010, fulfilling the following criteria: (1) randomized, prospective observational, retrospective, or meta-analysis; (2) involving adult patients with chronic HCV infection; and (3) data (fibrosis stage, treatment regimen, efficacy, safety) available for cirrhotics. Reviews were excluded. Search terms included chronic hepatitis C, fibrosis, cirrhosis, interferon alfa, ribavirin, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver decompensation.

Results: Forty-five studies were identified. The rates of sustained virologic response to pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin ranged from 10% to 44% for HCV genotypes 1/4 to 33% to 72% for genotypes 2/3 in compensated cirrhosis, while falling to 0% to 16% and 44% to 57%, respectively, in the decompensated stage, compared with 29% to 55% for genotypes 1/4 and 70% to 80% for genotypes 2/3 in noncirrhotic patients (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis: P<0.001 for genotypes 1/4 and P = 0.002 for genotypes 2/3; decompensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis: P<0.001 for all genotypes).

HCV clearance was associated with a reduced risk of liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma development, liver-related mortality, and hepatitis recurrence after liver transplantation. Treatment during compensated cirrhosis proved to be most cost-effective versus treatment after decompensation or a no-treatment strategy. Headache (54%), irritability (38%), fatigue (34%), and nausea (30%) were the most common adverse events in compensated patients, while anorexia (100%), fatigue (59%), neutropenia (53%), and thrombocytopenia (50%) were most common in decompensated patients.

Conclusions: Anti-HCV treatment in cirrhotic patients was less effective than in noncirrhotic patients. Viral eradication reduced the risk of liver complications and improved survival in noncirrhotics. Based on effectiveness and tolerability data, therapy has a significant effect in patients with compensated cirrhosis, while decompensated patients need to weigh the risks versus benefits of treatment.

Cheers!
Hector
Cancel
4 Answers
Page 1 of 1
Avatar universal
thank you so much for posting this article and your synopsis.
eric
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
897070 tn?1320656229
Thanks Hector, hope youre well.
BW

Paul
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
1420486 tn?1384796753
   Thanks for the info. Hector. I was just talking to  a friend who has a friend wwith these comp (maybe) I will send them to your post
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
Many thanks, Hector.
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Recent Activity
317787 tn?1468754865
Blank
Dee1956 commented on meegWpaw's status
9 hrs ago
317787 tn?1468754865
Blank
Dee1956 commented on meegWpaw's status
9 hrs ago
317787 tn?1468754865
Blank
Dee1956 commented on Jade59's status
Aug 23
Blank
Weight Tracker
Track your weight over time
Start Tracking Now
Top Hepatitis Answerers
317787 tn?1468754865
Blank
DC
163305 tn?1333672171
Blank
Rural Mural, CA
446474 tn?1446351282
Blank
San Francisco, CA
Avatar universal
Blank
1747881 tn?1358189534
Blank
Greeley, CO
2059648 tn?1439770265
Blank
Hepatitis C Community Resources