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Double whammy
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Double whammy

Hey guys need your help on this one. Last year I went for my medical checkup & was tested positive for Hep C. The doc ordered a IgG RIBA & antibody test which turn out negative & I was told the 1st test is false positive. Yesterday I went for a medical checkup again & Hep C came back as positive again !!! I will be going back for a 2nd test next week.

But just wondering what are the chances of a false positive result twice? Also I am a regular blood donor does that have anything to do with the twice positive result? I am really worried now. So depress that this is happening to me....
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Avatar_m_tn


       the screening test for Hep C is very SENSITIVE for antibodies.  So it may 'cross react'

with antibodies other than Hep C to show a false + result.  If the signal to cutoff ratio is <

2, the result probably is false +.  the RIBA confirmatory test is very SPECIFIC for

Hep C antibody.  A pos screening test result with a neg RIBA is a neg result for Hep C

antibody.  This means 'never exposed' NOT prior exposure with clearence.  

With a neg Riba, you never had Hep C antibody.

Bear, there is NO immunity from Hep C.   having it, then clearing it, does NOT give

you immunity.  Hep C is a tricky little spiglet.  Not like measles and mumps.

In your case, with a neg Riba, you were never exposed.

  
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13 Comments Post a Comment
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317787_tn?1373214989
Hi I am not a doctor but from what you wrote you have "reacted" to the Hep C test which means you have been exposed
The next test then measures your viral load and it sounds like you were negative there.
So, while you have been exposed to Hep C which your body "reacted" to you don't have viral load (amount) in your blood
I am sure others will help
Good luck!
Dee
as an aside, back in the 90's I had 2 false negatives for Hep C which was unfortunate as I went on till 2007 before I got the right diagnosis
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi, yes I was tested reactive in 2010 and this time round as well. Is there any time frame for the viral load as you've mentioned to show in blood test if I'm really infected? As from what I understand yours only reflected positive after more than 10 years?
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87972_tn?1322664839
Hi, and welcome to the discussion group. If you received positive HCV antibody results followed by a negative HCV RIBA test then you aren’t infected with the virus; despite ongoing positive antibody results.

HCV RIBA is considered conclusive for exposure; however, your doctor might consider ordering an ‘HCV RNA by PCR’ test to confirm there is no active virus present. It can take up to six months from exposure for antibodies to develop, although they will develop in most patients in 6 12 weeks. The HCV RNA by PCR test should be conclusive 2-3 weeks post exposure.

Good luck--

Bill
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Avatar_m_tn
"Also I am a regular blood donor does.............."

I'm curious, is this regular donation through the Red Cross & have they ever notified you of any problems? Through a blood donation is how I found my HCV infection.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi Bill1954 Thanks for the reply. Does it mean that I'm never infected with Hep C before? Is it possible for  someone to get 2 false positive results even after a period of 1 plus year? Also, why? I will copy & give the test you recommended to my doc next week when I go for the confirmation test.

Thank You.

Bear
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi, I'm not sure if the blood donation program is through Red Cross but from what I understand they do not check for Hep C when I en quire them about it.
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Avatar_m_tn
yes they do check for hepatitis
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179856_tn?1333550962
20% of folks who get hepc have their own immune system kill off the disease however you would always test positive for the antibodies. So you dont have the actual disease anymore (but you did at one time).
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi guys, sorry but I'm a noob to this. If my initial Hep C test is Reactive but RIBA & antibody came back as Negative does that mean I have Hep C antibodies minus the viral? And are these antibodies similar in definition as me having my Hep B shot and developing antibodies thereafter?

Will my future Hep C test always turn out Reactive in this case?

Thanks in advance.

Bear
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1118724_tn?1357014191
Think of antibodies as the footprint of a disease. All it really says is a disease has been there. A PCR will tell whether it is still there or not. If you say my "antibody came back as Negative" then what's the problem? You don't have Hep C and never did. Specifically what was your "initial test?" that caused this false negative? Otherwise you are correct it is possible to have antibodies minus the virus, and yes it is similar to your Hep B vaccine example. I'm just confused by the explanation, ha, but then I'm easily confused. Best of Luck.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hey guys,

Just called the clinic and was told the current first test I took is Hep C antibody-Reactive and my RIBA just came back Negative, both tests yield the same result last year too. My questions are:

1) Does this mean I was once infected with Hep C thus the reactive antibody result and am I "immunize" against Hep C now?

2) Will having a reactive antibody turn the result to a Positive RIBA in future as mentioned by one of the fellow forum members above?

3) Am I still good for blood donation in future?

Thanks in advance.
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1710974_tn?1308257390
Hi Bear,
Bill has explained this well as I understand it from my first hepatologist.
He can probably answer your questions better than me, but the first test just shows exposure. Your body developed antibodies to fight it off, which it clearly did, as you are negative RIBA. So I don't think it is right to say you were infected with it, but maybe you are thinking that is the same as exposure. I believe infection is different, because you didn't 'catch' it, you fought it off.
Most definitely donated blood is tested for hep C. I can guarantee you that. My husband donates all the time; everytime, he has to go through the grilling because I have hep C, but they take his blood and beg him to come back. They post results, including colesteral online.
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Avatar_m_tn


       the screening test for Hep C is very SENSITIVE for antibodies.  So it may 'cross react'

with antibodies other than Hep C to show a false + result.  If the signal to cutoff ratio is <

2, the result probably is false +.  the RIBA confirmatory test is very SPECIFIC for

Hep C antibody.  A pos screening test result with a neg RIBA is a neg result for Hep C

antibody.  This means 'never exposed' NOT prior exposure with clearence.  

With a neg Riba, you never had Hep C antibody.

Bear, there is NO immunity from Hep C.   having it, then clearing it, does NOT give

you immunity.  Hep C is a tricky little spiglet.  Not like measles and mumps.

In your case, with a neg Riba, you were never exposed.

  
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