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Hcv antibody s/co 0.3 question pls help!
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Hcv antibody s/co 0.3 question pls help!

I could very likely shared a needle with a hcv positive individual. I got tested at 4 weeks and got a s/co of 0.3. This is a negative (0-0.9 = negative) but I'm worried that the low number is only because it is so soon after exposure. Is this correct logic? Does the s/co gradually rise after exposure until you are positive? I am thinking this because all of my other hcv tests (4 other ones) had s/co of 0 or less then .1 (whatever the smallest value is). Any one with experience with this please help?!?
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1747881_tn?1358189534
If your worried have a HCV RNA by PCR test ran, other than that your test shows clearly negative.

How soon after exposure to HCV can HCV RNA be detected by PCR?

HCV RNA appears in blood and can be detected as early as 2–3 weeks after infection.
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1747881_tn?1358189534
It should say clearly negative at this time since a 4 wk antibody test is not conclusive

How soon after exposure to HCV can anti-HCV be detected?

HCV infection can be detected by anti-HCV screening tests (enzyme immunoassay) 4–10 weeks after infection. Anti-HCV can be detected in >97% of persons by 6 months after exposure

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/HCVfaq.htm#c5
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4113881_tn?1401895587
"I got tested at 4 weeks and got a s/co of 0.3. This is a negative (0-0.9 = negative) but I'm worried that the low number is only because it is so soon after exposure. "

I'm curious to what AB test you had. It seems awful sensitive with an s/co of >0.9.

Screening Test

Ortho HCV Version 3.0 ELISA Test System Ortho EIA
(Enzyme Immunoassay)                                                                  ≥ 3.8

Abbott HCV EIA 2.0 Abbott EIA
(Enzyme Immunoassay)                                                                  ≥ 3.8

VITROS Anti-HCV Ortho CIA
(Chemiluminescennt Immunoassay)                                                ≥ 8.0

AxSYM Anti-HCV Abbott MEIA
(Microparticle Immunoassay)                                                            ≥ 10.0

Architect Anti-HCV Abbott CMIA
(Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay)                               ≥ 5.0

Advia Centaur HCV Bayer CIA
(Chemiluminescennt Immunoassay)                                                  ≥ 11.0

Signal-to-Cut–Off Ratios for Commercially Available Assays

CDC has recommended that a person be considered to have serologic evidence of HCV infection only after an anti-HCV screening-test-positive result has been verified by a more specific serologic test (e.g., RIBA) or a nucleic acid test (NAT). This more specific, supplemental testing is necessary, particularly in populations with a lower prevalence of disease, to identify and exclude false positive screening test results. However, currently, the majority of laboratories report positive anti-HCV results based on a positive screening assay alone.

The recommended anti-HCV testing algorithm has been expanded to include an option that uses the signal-to-cut–off (s/co) ratios of screening-test--positive results. This can serve as an alternative to a supplemental test in some circumstances, minimizing the number of specimens that require supplemental testing and providing a result that has a high probability of reflecting the person's true antibody status.

Signal-to-cut–off ratios are calculated by dividing the optical density (OD) value of the sample being tested by the OD value of the assay cut-off for that run. Analysis of enzyme immunoassay and chemiluminescence assay data indicates that s/co ratios can be used to predict supplemental test-positive results. A specific s/co ratio can be identified for each test that would predict a true antibody-positive result (as defined by the results of supplemental testing) ≥95% of the time, regardless of the anti-HCV prevalence or characteristics of the population being tested.

Implementation of these recommendations will provide more reliable results for physicians and their patients, so that further counseling and clinical evaluation are limited to those confirmed to have been infected with HCV. This is especially critical for persons being tested for HCV infection for the first time, for persons being tested in non-clinical settings, and for those being tested to determine the need for medical referral. Implementation of these recommendations also will improve public health surveillance systems.

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/LabTesting.htm
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Avatar_f_tn
I'm sorry I don't know which AB test I had because I don't have the lab slip or paperwork. I just talked to my doctor about it and he mentioned I should be re-tested. I asked why and he told me because all of my other tests were 0 and this one was 0.3. He then explained that 0-0.9 was a negative and I should t be too worried, but I am super worried! Not knowing really *****! I mean it's not as bad as knowing you're positive but the anxiety is torture. I have an anxiety/paranoia disorder to top it all off.. Almost had a panic attack when I was through with the doc and immediately called 3 doctors in my family. They all said I shouldn't worry but admitted they had little knowledge on hcv
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4113881_tn?1401895587
" I just talked to my doctor about it and he mentioned I should be re-tested. I asked why and he told me because all of my other tests were 0 and this one was 0.3. He then explained that 0-0.9 was a negative and I should t be too worried, but I am super worried! "

Im assuming your doctor is just a general practitioner not a Hepatologist or Gastroenterologist. Many GP's dont know much about Hep C but they know how to read lab results. If he said you are negative then you are negative. If you dont trust your doctor...everyone is entitled to a second...third opinion. If you are really that concerned then go get re-tested to put your mind at ease.

"Not knowing really *****! I mean it's not as bad as knowing you're positive but the anxiety is torture."

Id have to disagree. When I first tested...the not knowing really bothered me. Then when I was told I had the virus...I the anxiety went away. I went into survival mode and figured out what I needed to do to get rid of it. Im 2 months post treatment and my last blood draw at 1 month post treatment had me undetectable.

"I have an anxiety/paranoia disorder to top it all off."

If your dealing with that stuff you probably want to get retested just for peace of mind. Good luck to you.
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